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The Avalanche The Ward Family Web Pages

Extractions From the "Avalanche" a Crawford Co., MI Newspaper 1879-1940's

Notes


Warren C. STEPHAN

The following information extracted from the Grayling, Crawford Co., MI Newspaper Avalanche. NOTE: The date at the end of each extract indicates the date of the publication:
-Word has been received of the birth of a daughter Joanne to Mr. and Mrs. Warren STEPHAN (Annabel HARRIS) of Detroit on Jan. 29. (7 Feb 1935)

-Mrs. Nettie HARRIS and Mrs. Warren STEPHEN and daughter, Joanne, have moved from the Henry BORCHERS residence to the house formerly occupied by the George LUTZ family. (23 May 1934)


Annabelle HARRIS

The following information extracted from the Grayling, Crawford Co., MI Newspaper Avalanche. NOTE: The date at the end of each extract indicates the date of the publication:
- BORN - to Mr. and Mrs. Roy HARRIS, Sunday, July 19th, an 8-pound daughter. All well. (13 Jul 1933)

-BEAVER CREEK SCHOOL NOTES. Dist. No. 1 - Annabel HARRIS is a new pupil in our school. (2 Nov 1922)

-Miss Annabelle HARRIS underwent an operation for tonsils and adenoids at mercy Hospital Tuesday morning. (26 Apr 1923)

-Pupils Receiving 7th Grade Certificates Grayling
Annabelle HARRIS (10 Jun 1926)

-Eighth Grade Diplomas Presented Grayling
Annabel HARRIS (9 Jun 1927

-Annabel HARRIS was a member of the Camp Fire Girls. Her Indian name was - WITANOHI. It was an organization "started in the spring of 1911. It consists of groups of girls over twelve years of age and aims to show that beauty, romance and adventure can be found in wholesome ways. It trains the girls in womanliness and homecraft." (29 Dec 1927)

-Honor Roll For February
Students of Senior and Junior High School
Annabel HARRIS, Grade 9, Subject 4, Honor Points 8 (22 Mar 1928)

-GRAYLING HIGH TO GRADUATE 31
CLASS DAY, JUNE 11; COMMENCEMENT, JUNE 12

The members of the class who look forward to graduation are.....Annabelle HARRIS. (plus 30 others) (21 May 1931)

-31 RECEIVE DIPLOMAS
CLASS DAY EXERCISES TONIGHT
COMMENCEMENT PROGRAM FRIDAY NIGHT
The members of the class are as follows:
Annabelle HARRIS, daughter of Mrs. Nettie DAVIS. (11 Jun 1931)

-Miss Agnes BROZEK, who has been employed as operator at the local telephone exchange has been transferred to a simular position for the Tri-County Telephone Company at Alpena. She left Saturday night to assume her duties. The vacancy at the local exchange is being filled by Miss Annabelle HARRIS. (18 Jun 1931)

-Mrs. Henry BORCHERS, and her sister Mrs. Nettie DAVIS and the latter's daughter Miss Annabelle HARRIS spent a few days visiting friends in Saginaw last week. Miss Annabelle is one of the operators at the local telephone exchange. (20 Aug 1931)

-Mrs. Nettie HARRIS and daughter Annabelle and Mrs. Henry BORCHERS spent Wednesday in Saginaw and Flint visiting relatives. (13 Sep 1934)

-Word has been received of the birth of a daughter Joanne to Mr. and Mrs. Warren STEPHAN (Annabel HARRIS) of Detroit on Jan. 29. (7 Feb 1935)


Joanne STEPHAN

The following information extracted from the Grayling, Crawford Co., MI Newspaper Avalanche. NOTE: The date at the end of each extract indicates the date of the publication:
-Word has been received of the birth of a daughter Joanne to Mr. and Mrs. Warren STEPHAN (Annabel HARRIS) of Detroit on Jan. 29. (7 Feb 1935)

-Mrs. Nettie HARRIS and Mrs. Warren STEPHEN and daughter, Joanne, have moved from the Henry BORCHERS residence to the house formerly occupied by the George LUTZ family. (23 May 1934)


David (Little Needle) SHOPPENAGONS Chief

The following information extracted from the 1900 Census of Crawford County MI:
name - David SHOPINAGON
color - Indian/Chipewaw
a.80
b.1812 in MI
occupation - Guide & Hunter
married 50 years to Doran

The following information extracted from the 1910 Census of Grayling, Crawford, MI - Ancestry.com Image 8:
name - David SHOPENENGONS?
a.99?
b.MI
occupation - None
married twice?
married to Irene? ??years
f.b.MI
m.b.MI

The following information extracted from the Grayling, Crawford Co., MI Newspaper Avalanche. NOTE: The date at the end of each extract indicates the date of the publication:
-Dave SHABNEGAN says, "pretty much shamed me, no git um bear." (28 May 1879)

-Mr. David SHABNEGAN, chief of the Chipewas, informs us that he, with several of his trusty warriors, will execute the war-dance here on the fourth of July. We have already tied down our scalp down with a clothes line. (28 May 1879)

-JULY 4, 1879,
ORDER OF EXERCISES:
Procession will form on the square and march to the grove.
Prayer - Rev. Mr. EVANS.
Reading Declaration of the Independence.
Oration - Dr. S. C. BROWN.
After which all will partake of a gorgeous repast, and then comes the fun.
Highly interesting and soul-stirring war dance by Chief SHABNEGAN and 12 picked warriors of his tribe, after which will be given the grandest display of Fire Works ever witnessed in Northern Michigan. (28 May 1879)

-David SHOPP-NEG-GANS shot a bear Monday night. No more shamed, him. (4 Jun 1879)

-On seeing the lynx which was brought into town last Monday, Dave SHOP-NE-GANS remarked: "Me no know 'em him; funny animol, it! Where you shoot it, dis?" (24 Sep 1879)

-An unfortunate affair occurred in this village on Monday evening last, in the destruction of Mr. David SHOPPENEGAN's residence, near the bride. The inmates, his wife and five children, barely had time to escape the devouring element, and saved nothing of much value, as the structure was a very flimsy affair, and highly inflamable. Mr. S. was "way up down the river" at the time, and when he returned the next day, was much surprised, and "heap mad, he," as this was the second burn-out he has experienced since his advent among us. Our sympathetic and kind-hearted citizens, have, with their usual promptness, raised, by subscription, a sum of money, and we are informed, purpose to build him a new house at once. (24 Feb 1881)

-"Pretty much mad, me. Me talkum now. No more better now. Somebody shotum dog, me. Don't know, me. Way-up down river. Pretty bad, he. No more better, now." - David SHOPPENNEGANS. (24 Mar 1881)

-Mr. David SHOPPENEGONS caught a large wildcat in one of his traps up the Sable about four miles, on Tuesday of this week. (19 May 1881)

-Chief SHOPPENNEGANS, the mighty nimrod of Crawford county, returned from "way up down the 'Sable" last Saturday, with a boat load of venison, etc. (27 Oct 1881)

-David SHOPPENNEGANS has the frame to his new wigwam up, and expects to sit in council in about two moons. (3 Nov 1881)

-Chief SHOPPENEGONSE surrounded a flock of bears' in a large swamp near this village on Tuesday, and shot and killed all the little bearases, and somewhat demoralized the old dame with a winged messenger of death, and which he is still in pursuit of. (1 Dec 1881)

-SHOPPENNEGANS, who has been confined to his home for the past four or five weeks, was able to be out again for the first time last Saturday evening, much to the gratification of his many friends. (19 Jan 1882)

-Mrs. SHOPPENNEGANS and two daughters arrived in town on the yesterday p.m. northward train. How long they will tarry we know not. ( 2 Feb 1882)

-Chief SHOPPENEGANS walks straighter than ever. He caught four beavers last week, which netted him nearly twenty-tive dollars. (16 Feb 1882)

-Mr. FINN and Mr. SHOPPENNEGUNS went "spearing" last Su-aturday evening. Among the many fish they captured was a pickerel weighing just 15 pounds. ( 20 Apr 1882)

-David SHOPPENNEGANS killed a bear one day last week with his tomahawk. We might add the bear was first caught in a trap. (18 May 1882)

-David SHOPPENNEGANS is having success in his hunting this spring. He has killed two bears since our last report. (1 Jun 1882)

-The grand Indian War Dance on the Fourth, led by the celebrated Indian Chief, Shop-pen-ne-gons, will be worth coming hundreds of miles to witness. (28 Jun 1883)

-SHOPPENNEGONS "laid out" two fine bucks Monday. (1 Nov 1883).

-Chief SHOPPENNEGONS, of Grayling, is making sugar in our vicinity. (17 Apr 1884)

-SHOPPENEGON brought in six deer on last Friday, killed by him within a day or two. (13 Nov 1884).

-SHOPPENEGANS brought in a very large bear and cub, yesterday, which he had killed in Forest, where he reports big signs of bruin. (4 Dec 1884)

-At the party last week the assembly was entertained by a grand dance by SHOPPENEGANS in all the glory of war paint and feathers. (15 Jan 1885)

- TO THE FRIENDS OF GRAYLING
Dear Friends of Grayling. I put this piece of paper in this office. Friends I do not like to see this. It would be better to be friends with each other. It would better be the ................us. I say to those that lives here in town of Grayling, as every other town is unexpected not to be as good as ours. Whenever I go outside my part of the State, they would ask me about Grayling. I would say there are better people there in Grayling, than here, that is always my answer. And I, myself, try to do the best i can. The reason I say this for, is they will be trouble soon, on account of the dogs. Some of the dogs are good use, and others are not. Some dogs are watch dogs. They are quite useful, and this female dog, whose dog it is, wants to keep it, good, keep it at home or chained if he wants it. That is the reason there are so many dogs around town, he doesn't keep it at home. And another reason they are poisoned. that is not right. We hav'nt only dogs, we have some other cattles besides a dog. The law doesn't say to kill dogs right in the town. The only way I heard, is, when a dog chases a deer in the fall, only they can shoot it. But to shoot it here in town, and putting poison, that's not right, it makes some of our friends sorry for the loss of their useful dog.
I am sincerely your friend,
DAVID SHOPPENAGAN. (25 Mar 1885)

-A letter was received at the Post-Office, one day last week, which was addressed to Miss Petaw-we-ge-go-qua. It was intended for the wife of Indian David. What a name!. But what's in a name? "An Indian by any other name would smell just as sweet." (23 Jul 1885)

-SHOPPENAGON is engaged in writing up a "History of the Indians," and has engaged Congressman FISHER to have it copyrighted. (21 Jan 1886)

-SHOPPENAGON made a complete suit of Buskskin, and ornamented it with eagle's feathers and claws, and sent it to E. E. FLINT, of new York City, as a present. (28 Jan 1886)

-The Grayling Orchestra have arranged with the well known Indian Chief SHOPENAGON, to have an Indian dance at the hall on the evening of February 22d, in connection with their Grand Masquerade Ball. SHOPPENAGON will be assisted by other chiefs from St. Ignace and Saginaw. Come one and all and enjoy yourselves. (11 Feb 1886)

-The celebrated Indian Chiefs, SHOPPENAGON, of Grayling, David Bowling ALLEY and Albert Land LOOKER, high much-a-mucks from St. Ignace and Siginaw, (in-a-horn) gave a series of Indian dances, the night of the ball, at the Opera House. Everybody was delighted and considered it the best show for the money that they had never attended. (25 Feb 1886)

-Maurice J. and SHOPPENAGON went on a fishing excursion on last Monday morning. They got plenty of bites if nothing else if the mosquitos got in their work on the river as well as they do in the cedar swamps. (3 Jun 1886)

-David SHOPPENAGON killed a bear a short distance from Fredericville, on last Saturday morning,. It gave him a lively tussle although it was fast in the trap. (24 Jun 1886)

-Messrs. E. F. RAYMOND, O. RAYMOND, George McCULLOUGH, William FORTIER and SHOPPENAGON, started on a fishing and hunting excursion last Friday morning. The deer and grayling must have suffered. (30 Sep 1886)

-David SHOPPENAGON, of Grayling, king of the AuSable country and guide to hunters and anglers, was in the city yesterday after his winter's stock of ammunition. He is about to embark on a three week's hunt. - Bay City Tribune. (11 Nov 1886)

-David SHOPPENAGON of Grayling, king of the Au Sable country and guide to hunters and anglers, was in the city on yesterday after his winters stock of ammunition. He is about to embark on a three weeks' hunt. He has a whole page of manuscript which he says is the commencement of a book, and he wants Congressman FISHER to get the book copyrighted for him. David is a good Indian, and is well-known and much respected by all who know him. He says he wants his book copyrighted so that no person can steal it from him after it is published, and says he wants the profits of the book to support him in his old age, and his family after he is gone, the same as Gen. GRANT's book does his family. - Bay City Tribune. (18 Nov 1886)

-About two hundred people assembled last Saturday to see Chief SHOPPENAGONS and his braves in the great Buffalo dance, which was adjourned to the Opera House. But few of the braves materialized or there would have been "much better fun," as it was "Big Injuns." (6 Jan 1887)

-Chief SHOPPENAGON's grandchild died yesterday morning. It had been sick all winter. (10 Feb 1887)

-Chief SHOPPENAGON, has just received the finest boat ever launched on the AuSable. (14 Jul 1887)

-Mr. David SHOPPENAGONS, our well known Indian in Grayling went to his native town, Saganin, to spend Christmas. He expresses his visit as very good. (Dec 1887)

-Mr. David SHOPPENAGONS, our well known Indian in Grayling, went to his native town, Saganin, to spend Christmas. He expresses his visit as very good. On Monday, Dec. 26th, the Christmas dinner took place at which many were present from different places. A long table was set that was loaded down with almost all kinds of victuals. Many kinds of game were served in a very delicious way, such as rabbits, squirrels and birds of various kinds, and vegetables and fruits which may be seen served in the English way. While one table was set, the rest sang the beautiful hymn which rhymed in a very respected form:
"And are we yet alive,
And see each other's face!
Glory and praise to jesus give
For His redeeming grace!"
The little children even helped to sing. It was a glorious signt indeed. SHOPPENAGONS is very thankful he was present, but sorry no white man was present. (5 Jan 1888)

-Chief SHOPPENAGON killed and brought into Grayling last Tuesday, one of the largest bear ever killed in this section. It weighed over 200 pounds, if Prof. HUBBARD weighed it correctly. He also brought in three cubs in their infantile state, as their eyes are not yet opened. All democrats. (23 Feb 1888)

-Old SHOPNAGANCE, of Grayling, the high-mnuck-a-muck in these parts of a vanishing race, has recently taken a new role in the play of life. He was out in the woods a short time ago, three days from home, when he ran across an old she bear which he slaughtered with the aid of his rifle. Searching about he found the bears' nest and in it three cubs, scarcely two weeks old. These he adopted but was a little nonplussed when they sat up a yelling for something to drink. "Shop" was equal to the emergency and became mother to the motherless cubs. Until he reached home he kept the little fellows alive by feeding them milk from his own mouth, which he first took into that receptacle. When he reached home he made different arrangements.
SHOPNAGANCE is known to Bay City sportsmen to be a man of various qualifications, but his latest exploit is something they had not expected from him. - Bay City Tribune. (1 Mar 1888)

-Presiding Elder CASTER is expected to be present Thursday and Friday evenings. In view of the large number of Indian members of his district David SHOPPENAGON will assign him an Indian name Thursday evening, by which he will be known among them. (15 Mar 1888)

-Chief SHOPPENAGONS has been presented with a fine Winchester rifle. We did not learn the name of the generous donner. (12 Jul 1888)

-The following Graylingites went to Bay City last Friday, we suppose, to see the Circus: Prof. LANKENAW, W. O. BRADEN, Chief SHOPPENAGON, Mrs. HARTWICK, L. FOURNIER and Walker MITCHELL. (12 Jul 1888)

-One of the most noted arrivals in the city yesterday was old SHOPNAGANCE, the well known Indian guide of the AuSable. He came down amidst the snorting of the steam engine and the clashing of the circus parade, and while the performance was in progress, Shop was as much admired as any of the heavy attractions in the employ of the great showman. He was rigged in his holiday attire - full dress, with feathers and bear claws and other embelishments to be had only from a successful raid in the northern wild woods. Shop's costume was that of an Indian chief, and he wore it with as much grace and dignity as should be expected from a person of his prominence. Speaking about the circus, Shop said: "Much good show. Many men. Coming men all time. - Bay City Tribune. (12 Jul 1888)

-Chief SHOPPENAGON has sold one of his bear cubs to Julian L. YALE, of Cleveland, Ohio. (16 Aug 1888)

-David SHOPPENAGON started for the Fox River country last Monday where he will put in the time for six weeks or more fishing and hunting in that section along with Mr. FLINT, of Chicago. (23 Aug 1888)

-SHOPPENAGON returned last week from his hunting trip in the far north, where he went with Mr. FLINT, of Chicago. They had a big time and killed three moose. Shop brought home a pair of moose horns which are quite a curiosity. (27 Sep 1888)

-SHOPPENAGON and other noted Indians, will have or give a grand entertainment of some description at the Opera House, on New Years' Eve, to which all are invited. (27 Dec 1888)

-Geo. L. ALEXANDER and SHOPPENAGON passed the Fourth fishing for grayling. (11 Jul 1889)

-Old SHOPNAGANCE, the Indian guide of Grayling, passed through the city a few days ago on his way to the Indian town in Saginaw county, and to Isabella county, on a visit to red men. He trapped seven beavers and six otters this winter. (20 Feb 1890)

-Marius HANSON, J. HARWICK, J. F. WILCOX and SHOPPENAGON returned from the Sturgeon river last Saturday, where they had been fishing. They report a successful trip. (31 Jul 1890)

-Geo. L. ALEXANDER is enjoying an outing on the Manistee, with SHOPPENAGON for a guide. (23 Jul 1891)

-The mighty Chief, and heretofore great warrior, SHOPPENAGANS, now following the arts of Peace, has raised this year a species of flint corn, that has no superior, in Michigan. (29 Sep 1892)

-SHOPPENAGON, Grayling's noted Indian chief, is quite sick with pneumonia, with but slight changes of recovery. (15 Mar 1894)

-SHOPPENAGON is recovering slowly and was able to be out on the streets Tuesday. (10 May 1894)

-Chief SHOPPENAGONS was resplendent with wampum and feathers, on the Fourth. (12 Jul 1894)

-J. W. HARTWICK and Marius HANSON, accompanied by Chief SHOPPENAGON, took the train for Vanderbilt, where they expected to take a 75 mile trip down the Pigeon, but owing to the extreme heat of the forest fires, smoke, and shallow water which caused them to wade and to dredge the river with their hands and sticks for about three miles, finally giving it up as a bad job. Three miles down the Pigeon was equivalent to a 15 mile walk to Vanderbilt, (?) where they secured a team and had boat and camp equipage taken to town where they took the train for Grayling. One mess of fish for three persons was the result of the trip. The AuSable or Manistee is good enough for them, so they say, and are now camped on the Manistee. (30 Aug 1894)

-David SHOPPENAGON and family and Tom CHITTAGO and family will appear at the social at N. MICHELSONS' tomorrow evening and will give native songs. (25 Oct 1894)

-Do not fail to attend the Social and Supper at the residence of N. MICHELSON, to-morrow evening. There will be "heaps of Big Ingins" as the committees and SHAPPENAGON will appear in appropriate costume. (25 Oct 1894)

-INDIAN SOCIAL.
The Indian Social held at the residence of Mr. N. MICHELSON last Friday evening was a pleasant and very unique affair. David SHOPPENAGON Chief of the Chippewas, and family, assisted by Tom CHITTAGO, gave some interesting and novel examples of native songs and war dances.
Mr. MICHELSON had given their spacious residence entirely to the use of the society and the first parlor was a veritable Indian home, containing a wigwam, draperies and portierres of Indian blankets; a bright little squaw selling baskets of their own make; Owls, Ducks, Deer and a large Wildcat in the green boughs added to the reality of the scene. The belles and beau of the town were invited to join in the festivities, and appeared in costumes kindly made and provided by the Indians.
A bountiful supper was served to about 175 persons and about $30.00 was added to the Treasury of the Ladies Aid Society of the M. E. Church.
Mrs. WOODWORTH, Secretary. (1 Nov 1894)

-David SHOPENAGONS and grand child went to Isabella county to camp meeting. His grandchild will play on the organ and he will sing. (5 Sep 1895)

-Chief SHOPPENEGANS, with his silk hat, buckskin breeches and embroidered vest, with his daughter Cora, attended the camp meeting in Isabella county last week. (12 Sep 1895)

-SHOPPENEGON has his shipyard open for the season. He has his second boat on the stocks, and she is a dandy. (19 Mar 1896)

-A striking feature in the Frederic parade, last Friday evening, was the tall form of Chief SHOPPENAGONS in full panoply of feathers, etc., as the leader of the processian. (15 Oct 1896)

-Chief SHOPPENAGON, of Grayling, was an interesting visitor in town, last Saturday. - Lewiston Journal. (24 Dec 1896)

-R. HANSON and Chief SHOPPENAGANS took in the concatination of the order of Hoo-Hoos, at Detroit, last week. The black cats were numerous, and yowled excessively. (16 Sep 1897)

-Chief SHOPPENEGANS was the observed of all observers in Detroit, last week. His picture adorned the columns of the Journal, Thursday, and the Free Press and Tribune vied to do him honor. We expect to see him covered with cats fur hereafter. Get him to tell the story, we cannot do it justice. (16 Sep 1897)

- The Lumbermen Meet.
As expected last Thurday, on the invitation of Salling., Hanson & Co., the Retail Lumberman's Association, who were holding their annual meeting in Detroit, came to Grayling in a train of special cars, arriving in time for dinner. As the train rolled in they were greeted with such a blast of whistles from all the mills, as was never before heard in this vicinity. The Citizen's Band was at the depot and rendered several choice selections while greetings were being exchanged, and the party were dined at the Railroad Eating House and Central Hotel.
In the afternoon the mills were visited and the new county buyidings looked over, while at the Club rooms was enjoyed hours of social and business interest. At 7:30 headed by the band, the party with invited guests from Lewiston and Gaylord, and the business men of Grayling, repaired to the Opera House, which had beeen transposed into an immense dining hall, the tables beautifully laid with 150 covers and profusely decorated with choice carnations. The band occupied the stage and discoursed sweetest music through the most elegant five course banquet that was ever attempted here, and which in all of its appointments would have done honor to the best caterer of any of our large cities. The tables were waited on by more than a score or more of young ladies of this place, ably assited by as many gentlemen. When all the company were satisfied with the tempting viands, cigars were lighted and the entire company united in singing "Michigan! my Michigan!: Mr. R. HANSON, as toastmaster, extended to the visitors a most cordial welcome, in his felicitous speech referring to the extended and close business relations of the manufacturer and the retail dealer. His remarks were roundly applauded and his welcome closed with repeated cheers. Senator HOLMES, of Detroit, Secretary of the Association, made a happy response, and was followed by O. PALMER, speaking to the toast of "Our County and its lumbering history." Representative KEEP, of Tekonsha, prefaced his speech with a well deserved tribute to our band, and then contrasted the lumber trade of thirty years ago with that of the present.
Geo. L. ALEXANDER spoke of the "Lumber Jack," and his strenuous life, and dilated on the manliness of the men engaged in the woods.
Messrs. CORWIN and HAMMOND, of Jackson; MILES, of Detroit; DRAKE, of Lewiston, and John PINE, representing the American Lumberman, and known here as "Jack Pine," with F. L. MICHELSON, J. J. COVENTRY and T. W. HANSON, of Grayling, each gave a happy talk, interspersing business with wit.
Chief SHOPPENAGONS was introduced as the mascot of Salling, HANSON & Co., and gave the visitors an Indian dance, then drawing out a mammoth jews harp invited the company to dance to his music which was fully done, and the banquet was ended, though the SEQUAELE was continued at the Club rooms and cars, 'til the wee sma hours.
Among the guests we noticed Messrs KEMPER, SMITH and BUEL, of Gaylord; JENSON, of SALLING; CUTLER, of Waters, and KNEELAND, DRAKE and FLUENT, of Lewiston. (13 Feb 1902)

-The alarm of fire Monday forenoon called out the town in quick time. It proved to be a small blaze in the addition to SHOPPENAGONS' house, which was extinguished with little damage by a bucket brigade. (12 Jan 1905)

-Chief SHOPONEGAN reported Tuesday morning that somebody entered his home on the Manistee and stole everything in sight and set fire to the building which was destroyed completely. The old chief had blood in his eyes and woe to the thief if he catches him. (10 Aug 1905)

-PINCONNING - Fred PERIOR of West Branch, charged with assault and battery on an Indian girl, a neice of Chief SHOPNAGON of Grayling paid a fine of $30 and costs, - Alpena Pioneer. (14 Sep 1905)

-Chief SHOPENAGONS was arrested Monday for assault and battery on the person of Game Warden PURCHASE. (12 Oct 1905)

-The jury said "Not Guilty" in the case against SHOPPENEGANS. We do not agree at all with the virdict as a matter of law though we would regret to see the old man suffer. (19 Oct 1905)

-Hon. Arthur HILL believes that a gift to him by the famous old Grayling Indian, SHOPPENEGONS, chieftian of the Chippewas, will bring him luck in the senatorial fight. It is a fine red sandstone calumet, or peace pipe, which the old Indian has been at work on for several months, fashioning and decorating. "Heap fine." grunted "Shop," as he handed the pipe to Mr. HILL. Tak'um Wash'n'ton when you senator." (10 Jan 1907)

-Chas. W. WARD of Queens, Long Island, who is a native of Michigan and a frequent visitor to Saginaw, has just given a $2,500 commission to E. I. COUSE, of New York, the painter of Indian pictures and who is one of the most distinguished sons of Saginaw. The commission is to paint the portrait of the old Chippewa chief, SHOPPENAGON's. Mr. WARD's father was one of the pioneer lumbermen of the state, and he himself has spent much time in the old pine woods. A wish to preserve the features of one of the last of a great Michigan tribe that has almost entirely disappeared, through the work of an artist of high rank, prompted him to his purpose. Mr. COUSE, who is now in the city will go to Grayling, which is SHOPPENAGON's home, and in the natural environment and setting of the AuSable river country, seek the inspiration for his work. The sittings will be at Grayling. (13 Jun 1907)

-Chief SHOPPENAGONS has posed as a hero for the past week, at the great "Home Coming" at Owosso, where his father lived for many years at the head of the tribe, before the site for the present city was known to the whites. "Shop" was the observed of all observers in his costume and feathers. (1 Aug 1907)

-Chief SHOPPENAGONS with grand daughter, Nancy, and her baby, went to Saginaw Monday morning to be a part of the big show. "Shop" says, "All Indian Dress." (22 Aug 1907)

-Another row at the home of Chief SHOPPENAGONS last week resulted in the serious brusing and cutting of his wife's face, and gave the old chief a ten days rest in the county jail. From his standpoint the squaw is his slave that he has a right to punish for disobedience. There was undoubtedly great provocation, hence the light sentence. (30 Jan 1908)

-The Grayling Band has been engaged to play for two days at the Home Coming celebration, at Bay City, Monday, July 5th and Tuesday, July 6th., and arrangements have been made for the running of a special train back to Grayling on Tuesday evening, July 6th, leaving after the great fire-works display. Monday and Tuesday are to be the big days of the Home Coming celebration. Monday being Pioneer's Day, also Military Day, when eight Companies of the State Militia and are to be there making a grand military parade. The Grayling band will lead one of the companies in the parade, and will also play a concert in front of the officers headquarters. One of the invited guests for the celebration is David SHOPPENAGONS, who will have a place of honor in the Pioneers parade. (10 Jun 1909)

-AN INDIAN MASCOT - One of Grayling's unique characters is old Chief SHOPPENAGON, an erect and stately Indian is 90 years of age, who is protege of President R. HANSON. SHOPPENAGON was prominent at the station when the train arrived and elsewhere throughout the day. He wears the white man's "conventional black" but varies it slightly by having a band of colored beads about four inches wide around each trouser leg just below the knee. His silk tie, too, is distinguished from the white man's by having around the crown a band of white metal, which with its saw tooth edge, looks like a coronet, SHOPPENAGON is looked upon by all Grayling people as a mascot, and he has done no work and lacked no comfort for many years.
During the afternoon the Workingmen's club kept open house and there was a jolly crowd present. Near 5 o'clock the band headed the procession to the depot, and the autos fell in line. Just before departure three hearty cheers were given for Grayling by the Manistee men. A quartet sang the following verses, written by Harry J. KORLEY to the tune of "Rings on Her Fingers:"
Grayling has logs in the river,
Mills that are fine.
Auto to ride upon.
And air ships in her mind.
So lets get together, and you will agree
A boost for Grayling
Helps out Manistee. (25 Aug 1910)

-Chief SHOPPENNEGAN's is enjoying a rest in Mercy Hospital, his extreme age and debility demanding better care and treatment than could be furnished in his home. (18 May 1911)

-Mrs. SHOPPENNEGON, wife of Chief David, is said to be in critical, physical condition because of her extreme old age. (31 Aug 1911)

-Thos. Ke CHITTEGO, and wife of Pinconning, Mich., former residents of Grayling, were called here by the serious illness in the home of Chief David SHOPPENNEGON. (31 Aug 1911)

-We don't believe that our people in Grayling really know of the pitiful condition of our old friends, SHOPPENNEGON and his wife. They are both very ill at their home with nobody to help to make them comfortable during these last days of theirs. They are unable to wait upon themselves. There must be people in this village of ours or charitable organizations who, if they knew of these things, would provide a way to put this home, humble though it may be, in a livable condiation. Food and shelter have always been a plenty here, but now care is what is needed, and to do any good, it must come soon.
(31 Aug 1911)

-Mrs. Nancy COVAY, grand daughter of Chief David SHOPPENNEGON, returned here Tuesday morning and is looking after her grand father. (28 Sep 1911)

-Mrs. Irene SHOPPENAGONS, wife of David SHOPPENAGONS, died at their home in this village last Sunday evening at nine o'clock. She was ninety-six years of age and had been in poor health for some time. she is one of the few survivors of the Chippewa Indian tribe, and was the thrid wife of Mr. SHOPPENAGONS. She had been a resident of Grayling for over thirty years. Funeral was held from the home Tuesday afternoon, and she was laid to rest in Elmwood cemetery. She has been an industrious, hard-working woman and many a dollar has been brought into the home by the deftness of her fingers in basket weaving. The husband is grief stricken a the loss of his companion of many years. (12 Oct 1911)

-David SHOPPENAGONS, our Indian friend, is ill at his home near the bridge. It is hardly believed that he can recover sufficiently to get out agin. He is being well cared for by his granddaughter. (14 Dec 1911)

-D. SHOPPENAGON PASSES AWAY - Chippewa Indian over 100 years old. - Laid to rest in Elmwood Cemetery Yesterday.
Christmas night about seven o'clock when the social life of our citizens was being enjoyed to the full, there passed away from his humble home on the AuSable a man, who, because of his race, his great age and vigor of manly strength, and by reason of his unique personality, was one of the best known characters in Northern Michigan.
Very little is known of the early life of David SHOPPENAGAN except that he was a Chippawa Indian, that he spent most of his life in the Saginaw Valley and vacinity until he came to Grayling, early in the "seventies."
He is reputed to have been at one time a chief of his tribe, though we do not know that SHOPPENAGON of himself claimed that distinction. It is generally believed, however, that he was in his prime a medicine man, a term among the aborigenes supposed to combine the function of a physician with that of prophet; tho we do not know that SHOPPENAGAN claimed to possess the prophetic gift.
That he was an Indian of more than ordinary intelligence and influence among his tribe there can be no question.
Had he been educated as well as were George COPWAY and Peter JONES, historians of the Chippawa's, undoubtedly he would have been a man of mark.
His long life in the Saginaw valley covers more years than the history of Michigan as a state and seperate territory.
If the most conservative estimate of his age be true he must have been a boy of three years old when General Lewis CASS met the Chippewa tribe in council fire on the banks of the Saginaw in 1820, at a point on the West Side where the court house now stands. If the less conservative estimate be true, then he was a boy in his teens and must have known something of the grave topics discussed by his tribe with the government in that historic council.
SHOPPENAGON had a history which he might have told, but his familiar acquaintances of Grayling knew nothing of it. He chose to keep his own council, and thus died with him tales of pioneer adventure, perchance which would have rivalled the romance of "Leather Stocking Tales," or "The Last of the Mohigans."
SHOPPENAGON, tho born in the faith of the Chippewas, became a believer in the Christian religion and, as we believe in the faith of Jesus.
SHOPPENAGANS was a great hunter and trapper and was known to be an excellent marksman. It is believed that he has shot thousands of deer and many boar, wolves and elk. He was also familiar with practically every stream between Saginaw and Mackinaw. Many wonderful tales of his exploits are told around here.
He retained his excellent health up to about one year ago when his strength began to wave and his eye lose its piercing keenness. It was less than two years ago that he made a traping trip near Saginaw river and was gone several weeks.
The funeral was held yesterday at the Methodist Church where he was a member, Rev. J. H. FLEMING preached the funeral surmon. Tho the day was stormy and cold many turned out to pay tribute to their worthy friend.
Mr. SHOPPENAGAN had been father to several children, all of whom had preceeded him two their graves many years ago. He is survived by one granddaughter and one great grandson, both of whom were with him during his last illness.
When the future historian shall write up the history of Crawford county, that history will be incomplete if no reference is made to the lone Indian, a specimen of the "first American," whose name and familiar form has hitherto been associated with the growth and development of our prosperous village.
SHOPPENAGAN is gone; he is on his "long journey," but his friends will remember "Old Shop" with a great deal of pleasure, and feel that they have been benefitted by having known him. (28 Dec 1911)

-The old mill near the bridge was closed ysterday afternoon because of the funeral of David SHOPPENAGAN. (28 Dec 1911)

-The SHOPPENAGON monument has arrived and has been placed upon the cemetery lot that contains all that remains of the lifeless forms of Chief David SHOPPENAGON and his wife. Both passed away during the later days of the year 1911, Chief David closing his eyes after a long life of usefulness and adventure upon the beautiful Christmas morn of that year. The monument erected to his memory is of blue granite; it stands about six foot high upon a solid cement base. It is plain but artistic and at the top is a ball setting in an ornamental cap. On the face is carved the words "Chief David SHOPPENAGON; born 1809, died December 25th, 1911." It is a fitting memento of the esteem in which he was held by his friends in Grayling. The monument was purchased with money raised by popular subscription. (16 Oct 1913)

- Indian Makes Heap Jump
Naming of Grayling Hotel Recalls an Interesting Incident.
From the Rose City Review.
"Grayling's fine new hotel will be named "Shoppenagon Inn," after old Chief SHOPPENAGON, who for many years lived on the banks of the AuSable.
"'Old SHOP," as he was known finally became a pensioner, it is said, of SALLING, HANSON & Co., as a reward for his services to them in earlier times in locating valuable lumber tracts. SHOPPENAGON was typical of the aborigine - a race which is fast dying out and which authorities say there is no hope for. "SHOP" always retained his native characteristics, but was ever a favorite with the whites. He delighted to don his paint and feathers and give exhibitions of dancing for the benefit of interesting pale-face onlookers.
The writer remembers an occasion when a Sunday school excursion was run up the M. C. to Topinabee. "SHOP" attired in all of his iridescent regalia boarded the train at Grayling. At Topinabee the old Chief, with a retinue of white "warriors" in his wake, went thru a series of serpentine dances which added much to the pleasure of the occasion. He finally joined a party on a boat ride, and as the vessel was of small capacity and crowded, it was necessary for a few to occupy camp stools on the upper deck, the Indian being among the number. The whistle protruded above the deck about twelve inches. SHOPPENAGON placed his stool over the whistle and was nonchalantly smoking a cigar when the engineer pulled the cord. There was a cloud of steam, a siren screech and an Indian war hoop blended into one moment of pandemonium. It seemed to the passengers that the Big Chief was lifted into the air by the fog and finally landed on the deck. He held fast to the seat of his buckskins and howled weirdly, and was only prevented from jumping overboard by the timely interference of a passenger.
"Anyway, it is said Old SHOPPENAGON was a land lubber ever afterwards unti lhe died at the ripe old age of one hundred and something." (13 Apr 1916)

-It became known during the past week, that Mrs. Nancy HARRIS, who had made Grayling her home since birth, had died Aug. 7 at an Indian Reservation in the northern part of the state of tuberculosis, of which she had been ailing for the past year or more. Mrs. HARRIS was a grand-daugther of the old Indian Chief David SHOPENAGON, who passed away in December 1911. A small son, Edward, survives the deceased. (23 Aug 1917)

-More SHOPPENAGON info - (16 Feb 1928)


Henry SHOPPENAGONS

The following information extracted from the Grayling, Crawford Co., MI Newspaper Avalanche. NOTE: The date at the end of each extract indicates the date of the publication:
-Henry SHOPPENAGON died in 1881 (probably during Sep)


Thomas SHOPPENAGONS

The following information extracted from the Grayling, Crawford Co., MI Newspaper Avalanche. NOTE: The date at the end of each extract indicates the date of the publication:
-Mr. Thos. SHOPPENNEGAN was unfortunate in injuring one of his hands quite severely, one day last week, by a pevy coming in contact with it. (24 Mar 1881)

-Tom SHOPPENNEGANS has gone a visiting. Saginaw is said to be the favored place. (31 Mar 1881)

-The many friends of Tommy SHOPPENNEGONS will be pained to learn that he is lying very low with consumption. (21 Jun 1883).

-Rev. S. FINN, of Royal Oak, Mich. officiated at the funeral services of Thomas SHOPPENNEGONS last Sunday, and preached at the Opera House in the evening, in the absence of Rev. Mr. PUTMAN. Mr. FINN is the guest of his son, J. M. (Jul 1883)


Hattie SHOPPENAGONS

The following information extracted from the Grayling, Crawford Co., MI Newspaper Avalanche. NOTE: The date at the end of each extract indicates the date of the publication:
-Hattie, daughter of Indian Chief SHOPPENAGONS, died of a lingering consumption on the 12th inst. (21 Apr 1887)

-THANKS - May thanks to the kind friends of Grayling for their love and kindness to my sister Hattie, while she suffered here on earth. She has now gone where sickness and sorrow is never known, and where her mourning tears are wiped away forever. She has left this troublesome world and gone to heaven.
Yours respectfully
Mary SHOPPENEGONS (21 Apr 1887)

-


Mary SHOPPENAGONS

The following information extracted from the Grayling, Crawford Co., MI Newspaper Avalanche. NOTE: The date at the end of each extract indicates the date of the publication:
-DIED- On the 17th inst. at the residence of her father, David SHOPPENAGONS, Miss Mary SHOPPENAGONS, of Consumption, in her 22d year. Her body was buried on Thursday, and funeral service, were held in the M.E. Church, by Rev. J. W. TAYLOR. (25 Jul 1889)

-


Merilla BROWN

The following information extracted from the Grayling, Crawford Co., MI Newspaper Avalanche. NOTE: The date at the end of each extract indicates the date of the publication:
-Mrs. M. ALGER, of Fentonville, Mich., is visiting her sons, W. and E. ALGER. She is nearly 80 years of age and as active as many half her age. (2 Feb 1888)

-Delos ALGER, who is known to our people, having worked here two or three summers, arrived here last week with his mother, who will live with Washington. She is 81 yars of age, but active as many ladies at 60. Delos will probably remain here. (19 May 1892)

-Mrs. ALGER, mother of W. and E. ALGER, returned from Lewiston, last Friday. (14 Nov 1895)

-DIED - At the home of her son Washington ALGER, at Lewiston, Thursday, January 30, Marilla ALGER, aged 97 years. She leaves three sons Edwin D. ALGER of this place, Lewis Alger and Delos of Oakland County, and Washington of Lewiston. The funeral was held at Lewiston Sunday and the body buried at that place. Her death came peacefully and painless, and without sickness. The failing from age. (6 Feb 1908)


Delos I. ALGER

The following information extracted from the Grayling, Crawford Co., MI Newspaper Avalanche. NOTE: The date at the end of each extract indicates the date of the publication:
-Delos ALGER, who is known to our people, having worked here two or three summers, arrived here last week with his mother, who will live with Washington. She is 81 years of age, but active as many ladies at 60. Delos will probably remain here. (19 May 1892)

-Delos ALGER, Herbert HOLMES, Walter SMITH, Oscar Byr and Anthony ROCKEFELLER are working for contractor A. J. ROSE on Thos. MILNER's and other buildings in town, which Mr. R. is building. Mr. ROSE is also a carpenter. Wash. ALGER is doing carpenter work on his own house. - Lewiston Courier. (27 Oct 1892)

-DIED - At the home of her son Washington ALGER, at Lewiston, Thursday, January 30, Marilla ALGER, aged 97 years. She leaves three sons Edwin D. ALGER of this place, Lewis Alger and Delos of Oakland County, and Washington of Lewiston. The funeral was held at Lewiston Sunday and the body buried at that place. Her death came peacefully and painless, and without sickness. The failing from age. (6 Feb 1908)


Lewis C. ALGER

The following information extracted from the Grayling, Crawford Co., MI Newspaper Avalanche. NOTE: The date at the end of each extract indicates the date of the publication:
-Lewis ALGER, who has been visiting his brother Wash. here, the past six weeks, went to Otter Lake last Saturday. - Lewiston Journal. (12 Mar 1896)

-Lewis ALGER, of Oakland county, arrived here, Monday, to see his mother, who is very ill. - Lewiston Journal. (4 May 1899)

-DIED - At the home of her son Washington ALGER, at Lewiston, Thursday, January 30, Marilla ALGER, aged 97 years. She leaves three sons Edwin D. ALGER of this place, Lewis Alger and Delos of Oakland County, and Washington of Lewiston. The funeral was held at Lewiston Sunday and the body buried at that place. Her death came peacefully and painless, and without sickness. The failing from age. (6 Feb 1908)

-Married, in this village April 15, Lewis C. ALGER and Mrs. Anna BREESE. Justice McElroy officiating. (23 Apr 1908)


Anna LOCKE

The following information extracted from the Grayling, Crawford Co., MI Newspaper Avalanche. NOTE: The date at the end of each extract indicates the date of the publication:
-Married, in this village April 15, Lewis C. ALGER and Mrs. Anna BREESE. Justice McElroy officiating. (23 Apr 1908)

-Mrs. Anna Locke ALGER, age 91 years, of Lewiston, passed away at her home there Friday, September 20. Funeral services were held from the Lewiston Congregational Church on Sunday, September 22, at 4 o'clock, Rev. Floyd WRIGHT officiating. The remains were at the Grayling Funeral Home until Sunday. She leaves to mourn her passing two daughters and two sons. (26 Sep 1940)


Washington ALGER

The following information extracted from the Grayling, Crawford Co., MI Newspaper Avalanche. NOTE: The date at the end of each extract indicates the date of the publication:
-W. ALGER and brothers returned on Monday from a hunt of 2 weeks, and brought with them 8 deer and a bear, besides several coon, mink &c. &c. When they get after game, it has to come in. (20 Nov 1884).

-W. ALGER, of this place has just returned from a hunting trip bringing in eight deer. (4 Dec 1884)

-F. B. ROSE has just finished mounting a deer's head for W. ALGER, who killed the "varmint" this fall. It is one of the finest specimens we ever saw and is put up on grand style. (8 Jan 1885)

-W. ALGER has purchased a lot in .....................to Grayling, fronting on Peninsular Avenue, and intends building a house of his own, at an early day. (25 Jun 1885)

-W. ALGER is putting up a nice paling fence around his property on Peninsular Avenue. (20 May 1886)

-W. ALGER has put up an addition to his residence on Peninsular Avenue. (22 Jul 1886)

-MARRIED-At the residence of W. ALGER, Esq., in this village, Saturday, July 31st., Miss Maggie MANSFIELD and Mr. John HEREN. O. PALMER, J. P., officiating. (5 Aug 1886)

-W. ALGER killed a deer the fore part of this week, within less than a mile of town. (11 Nov 1886)

-A. J. ROSE and W. ALGER left on last Friday morning for the Big Creek section for a week's hunt. They will be apt to secure some venison. (2 Dec 1886)

-O. PALMER's barn looks very much like a new one. A big improvement. The ALGER brothers did the carpenter work. (29 Sep 1887)

-W. AUGUR and brother left for a hunt in Oscoda county, last Monday. (10 Nov 1887)

-W. ALGER and brother returned from a two weeks' hunt last Thursday. They brought in several deer as triumphs of their skill. (1 Dec 1887)

-Mrs. M. ALGER, of Fentonville, Mich., is visiting her sons, W. and E. ALGER. She is nearly 80 years of age and as active as many half her age. (2 Feb 1888)

-W. ALGER is wrestling with a severe case of Rheumatism. (1 Mar 1888)

-The Messrs. ALGER returned from their hunting expedition last Friday. (6 Dec 1888)

-W. AUGUR returned last Wednesday from a hunting trip, having shot and brought in six deer and one bear, as the result of his hunt. One of the bucks he says was the largest brought to Grayling. (12 Dec 1889)

-How is this for a fish story. Last Thursday morning W. ALGER caught a pickeral, in Portage Lake, which dressed 9 1/2 pounds, indside of which he found a sucker, recently swallowed that weighted 2 pounds and 1 ounce. (27 Feb 1890)

-Paint is improving the premises of W. ALGER. The artist is C. W. HARDER. (17 Apr 1890)

-W. ALGER and wife started for a month's visit East, Tueday morning. (11 Dec 1890)

-W. ALGER and wife returned from their visit to friends in Southern Michigan, last Friday. (22 Jan 1891)

-W. ALGER and a gentleman from Port Huron, captured thirteen deer during the season. (3 Dec 1891)

-Delos ALGER, who is known to our people, having worked here two or three summers, arrived here last week with his mother, who will live with Washington. She is 81 years of age, but active as many ladies at 60. Delos will probably remain here. (19 May 1892)

-L. FOURNIER is preparing to build on the lots from which he removed the W. ALGER residence, opposite the Catholic church. He has a fine location. (18 Aug 1892)

-Delos ALGER, Herbert HOLMES, Walter SMITH, Oscar Byr and Anthony ROCKEFELLER are working for contractor A. J. ROSE on Thos. MILNER's and other buildings in town, which Mr. R. is building. Mr. ROSE is also a carpenter. Wash. ALGER is doing carpenter work on his own house. - Lewiston Courier. (27 Oct 1892)

-E. ALGER and family spent Christmas with his brother, at Lewiston. (29 Dec 1892)

-W. ALGER, of Lewiston, was in town last Monday. (30 Mar 1893)

-Washington ALGER, of Lewiston, formerly of Grayling, has been granted a pension. (30 Mar 1893)

-W. ALGER, of Lewiston, was in town, Monday, and made us a call. (8 Mar 1894)

-The Lewiston Citizen's ticket contains the following former Graylingites: For Supervisor, Henry MANTZ; Treasurer, H. BAUMAN; Justice, W. ALGER; School Trustee, Wm. MANTZ; Township Committee, D. M. KNEELAND. (29 Mar 1894)

-Mrs. Washington ALGER gave a party last Friday evening in honor of her husband, who was 50 years of age that day. A large number of friends were present and an enjoyable time was passed. Mr. ALGER was presented with a valuable chair. - Lewiston Journal. (4 May 1894)

-Among the crowd from Lewiston, the 4th, was W. ALGER and wife, and Pros. Att'y. ORTHWAY and family. (12 Jul 1894)

-Washington ALGER's mother and his brother's wife, Mrs. Ed ALGER, both of Grayling, are visiting Mr. and Mrs. ALGER. - Lewiston Journal. (19 Jul 1894)

-E. ALGER and a nephew, were the guests of W. ALGER and wife, of Lewiston, last week. (13 Dec 1894)

-W. ALGER, of Lewiston, was in town the beginning of the week, visiting with his old friends. (30 May 1895)

-W. ALGER, of Lewiston was in town yesterday being ordered by Hoke SMITH, to show why he fought against the rebellion. (27 Jun 1895)

-Mrs. ALGER, mother of W. and E. ALGER, returned from Lewiston, last Friday. (14 Nov 1895)

-W. ALGER, of Lewiston, disposed of a watch, by a shooting match, last week. (30 Jan 1896)

-W. ALGER, of Lewiston, was in town one day last week, shaking hands with old friends and acquaintances. (23 Jul 1896)

-Washington ALGER and his mother drove down from Lewiston Monday, for a visit with his brother Ed. "Wash" has changed his ebon beard to a light silver gray. (24 May 1900)

-Washington ALGER, of Lewiston, a former resident here, was a guest of his brother, E. ALGER, during the session of court, he being called as a witness in one of the causes pending. (23 May 1901)

-W. ALGER, of Lewiston, was the guest of his brother Edwin, last week, and had time to meet many of his old friends here. (7 Nov 1901)

-DIED - At the home of her son Washington ALGER, at Lewiston, Thursday, January 30, Marilla ALGER, aged 97 years. She leaves three sons Edwin D. ALGER of this place, Lewis Alger and Delos of Oakland County, and Washington of Lewiston. The funeral was held at Lewiston Sunday and the body buried at that place. Her death came peacefully and painless, and without sickness. The failing from age. (6 Feb 1908)

-W. ALGER of Lewiston is visiting at G. F. OWENS, a few days. (20 Apr 1916)

-Miss Esther MOORE and Mr. Washington ALGER both of Lewiston were united in marriage on Wednesday of last week at Gaylord the Rev. Sanford MacDONALD of the M. E. Church officiating, Mr. ALGER was a resident of Grayling for some years, and both have hosts of friends here and in Montmorency county, where they have resided for more than twenty years. (7 Dec 1916)

- Mr. and Mrs. Washington ALGER of Gaylord were in the city on business the latter part of the week and remained over Sunday visiting Mrs. Mary TURNER. (22 Nov 1917)


Amelia Altana SCOTT

The following information extracted from the Grayling, Crawford Co., MI Newspaper Avalanche. NOTE: The date at the end of each extract indicates the date of the publication:
-Mrs. Henry BATES was visiting her aunt, Mrs. W. ALGER, of Lewiston, for several days last week. (14 Nov 1895)

-Mrs. W. ALGER went to Grayling, yesterday, for an extended visit with relatives. (10 Sep 1896)

-LEWISTON ITEMS - JOURNAL.
Mrs. ROBY, of Atherton, was visiting with Mrs. W. ALGER, on Tuesday. (25 Mar 1897)


Washington ALGER

The following information extracted from the Grayling, Crawford Co., MI Newspaper Avalanche. NOTE: The date at the end of each extract indicates the date of the publication:
-W. ALGER and brothers returned on Monday from a hunt of 2 weeks, and brought with them 8 deer and a bear, besides several coon, mink &c. &c. When they get after game, it has to come in. (20 Nov 1884).

-W. ALGER, of this place has just returned from a hunting trip bringing in eight deer. (4 Dec 1884)

-F. B. ROSE has just finished mounting a deer's head for W. ALGER, who killed the "varmint" this fall. It is one of the finest specimens we ever saw and is put up on grand style. (8 Jan 1885)

-W. ALGER has purchased a lot in .....................to Grayling, fronting on Peninsular Avenue, and intends building a house of his own, at an early day. (25 Jun 1885)

-W. ALGER is putting up a nice paling fence around his property on Peninsular Avenue. (20 May 1886)

-W. ALGER has put up an addition to his residence on Peninsular Avenue. (22 Jul 1886)

-MARRIED-At the residence of W. ALGER, Esq., in this village, Saturday, July 31st., Miss Maggie MANSFIELD and Mr. John HEREN. O. PALMER, J. P., officiating. (5 Aug 1886)

-W. ALGER killed a deer the fore part of this week, within less than a mile of town. (11 Nov 1886)

-A. J. ROSE and W. ALGER left on last Friday morning for the Big Creek section for a week's hunt. They will be apt to secure some venison. (2 Dec 1886)

-O. PALMER's barn looks very much like a new one. A big improvement. The ALGER brothers did the carpenter work. (29 Sep 1887)

-W. AUGUR and brother left for a hunt in Oscoda county, last Monday. (10 Nov 1887)

-W. ALGER and brother returned from a two weeks' hunt last Thursday. They brought in several deer as triumphs of their skill. (1 Dec 1887)

-Mrs. M. ALGER, of Fentonville, Mich., is visiting her sons, W. and E. ALGER. She is nearly 80 years of age and as active as many half her age. (2 Feb 1888)

-W. ALGER is wrestling with a severe case of Rheumatism. (1 Mar 1888)

-The Messrs. ALGER returned from their hunting expedition last Friday. (6 Dec 1888)

-W. AUGUR returned last Wednesday from a hunting trip, having shot and brought in six deer and one bear, as the result of his hunt. One of the bucks he says was the largest brought to Grayling. (12 Dec 1889)

-How is this for a fish story. Last Thursday morning W. ALGER caught a pickeral, in Portage Lake, which dressed 9 1/2 pounds, indside of which he found a sucker, recently swallowed that weighted 2 pounds and 1 ounce. (27 Feb 1890)

-Paint is improving the premises of W. ALGER. The artist is C. W. HARDER. (17 Apr 1890)

-W. ALGER and wife started for a month's visit East, Tueday morning. (11 Dec 1890)

-W. ALGER and wife returned from their visit to friends in Southern Michigan, last Friday. (22 Jan 1891)

-W. ALGER and a gentleman from Port Huron, captured thirteen deer during the season. (3 Dec 1891)

-Delos ALGER, who is known to our people, having worked here two or three summers, arrived here last week with his mother, who will live with Washington. She is 81 years of age, but active as many ladies at 60. Delos will probably remain here. (19 May 1892)

-L. FOURNIER is preparing to build on the lots from which he removed the W. ALGER residence, opposite the Catholic church. He has a fine location. (18 Aug 1892)

-Delos ALGER, Herbert HOLMES, Walter SMITH, Oscar Byr and Anthony ROCKEFELLER are working for contractor A. J. ROSE on Thos. MILNER's and other buildings in town, which Mr. R. is building. Mr. ROSE is also a carpenter. Wash. ALGER is doing carpenter work on his own house. - Lewiston Courier. (27 Oct 1892)

-E. ALGER and family spent Christmas with his brother, at Lewiston. (29 Dec 1892)

-W. ALGER, of Lewiston, was in town last Monday. (30 Mar 1893)

-Washington ALGER, of Lewiston, formerly of Grayling, has been granted a pension. (30 Mar 1893)

-W. ALGER, of Lewiston, was in town, Monday, and made us a call. (8 Mar 1894)

-The Lewiston Citizen's ticket contains the following former Graylingites: For Supervisor, Henry MANTZ; Treasurer, H. BAUMAN; Justice, W. ALGER; School Trustee, Wm. MANTZ; Township Committee, D. M. KNEELAND. (29 Mar 1894)

-Mrs. Washington ALGER gave a party last Friday evening in honor of her husband, who was 50 years of age that day. A large number of friends were present and an enjoyable time was passed. Mr. ALGER was presented with a valuable chair. - Lewiston Journal. (4 May 1894)

-Among the crowd from Lewiston, the 4th, was W. ALGER and wife, and Pros. Att'y. ORTHWAY and family. (12 Jul 1894)

-Washington ALGER's mother and his brother's wife, Mrs. Ed ALGER, both of Grayling, are visiting Mr. and Mrs. ALGER. - Lewiston Journal. (19 Jul 1894)

-E. ALGER and a nephew, were the guests of W. ALGER and wife, of Lewiston, last week. (13 Dec 1894)

-W. ALGER, of Lewiston, was in town the beginning of the week, visiting with his old friends. (30 May 1895)

-W. ALGER, of Lewiston was in town yesterday being ordered by Hoke SMITH, to show why he fought against the rebellion. (27 Jun 1895)

-Mrs. ALGER, mother of W. and E. ALGER, returned from Lewiston, last Friday. (14 Nov 1895)

-W. ALGER, of Lewiston, disposed of a watch, by a shooting match, last week. (30 Jan 1896)

-W. ALGER, of Lewiston, was in town one day last week, shaking hands with old friends and acquaintances. (23 Jul 1896)

-Washington ALGER and his mother drove down from Lewiston Monday, for a visit with his brother Ed. "Wash" has changed his ebon beard to a light silver gray. (24 May 1900)

-Washington ALGER, of Lewiston, a former resident here, was a guest of his brother, E. ALGER, during the session of court, he being called as a witness in one of the causes pending. (23 May 1901)

-W. ALGER, of Lewiston, was the guest of his brother Edwin, last week, and had time to meet many of his old friends here. (7 Nov 1901)

-DIED - At the home of her son Washington ALGER, at Lewiston, Thursday, January 30, Marilla ALGER, aged 97 years. She leaves three sons Edwin D. ALGER of this place, Lewis Alger and Delos of Oakland County, and Washington of Lewiston. The funeral was held at Lewiston Sunday and the body buried at that place. Her death came peacefully and painless, and without sickness. The failing from age. (6 Feb 1908)

-W. ALGER of Lewiston is visiting at G. F. OWENS, a few days. (20 Apr 1916)

-Miss Esther MOORE and Mr. Washington ALGER both of Lewiston were united in marriage on Wednesday of last week at Gaylord the Rev. Sanford MacDONALD of the M. E. Church officiating, Mr. ALGER was a resident of Grayling for some years, and both have hosts of friends here and in Montmorency county, where they have resided for more than twenty years. (7 Dec 1916)

- Mr. and Mrs. Washington ALGER of Gaylord were in the city on business the latter part of the week and remained over Sunday visiting Mrs. Mary TURNER. (22 Nov 1917)


Esther MOORE

The following information extracted from the Grayling, Crawford Co., MI Newspaper Avalanche. NOTE: The date at the end of each extract indicates the date of the publication:
-Miss Esther MOORE and Mr. Washington ALGER both of Lewiston were united in marriage on Wednesday of last week at Gaylord the Rev. Sanford MacDONALD of the M. E. Church officiating, Mr. ALGER was a resident of Grayling for some years, and both have hosts of friends here and in Montmorency county, where they have resided for more than twenty years. (7 Dec 1916)


Glen F. OWEN

The following information extracted from the Grayling, Crawford Co., MI Newspaper Avalanche. NOTE: The date at the end of each extract indicates the date of the publication:
-Married in St. Mary's rectory, July 1, Mr. Glenn OWEN and Maudie LaRUE, both of Grayling. Rev. J. J. RIESS officiating. (4 Jul 1912)

-Mr. and Mrs. Glen OWEN are the proud parents of an eight pound baby boy, born on Thursday June 25th. (3 Jul 1913)

-Ray OWEN, who has been in the west for the past four years, has returned and expects to remain here for a time. He is very enthusiastic over the west and expects to go back in the fall. He left Lovells this morning to visit his father, Geo. F. OWENS, after spending days with his sister, Mrs. H. C. SCHMIDT and and brother, Glen OWEN and families. He has been located at Smartsville, California. His friends are glad to welcome him back. (22 Apr 1915)

-Mrs. Glen OWENS and children left last Friday afternoon for Bay City to visit relatives and friends for several days. (10 Jun 1915)

-Glen OWEN brought in a fine deer Sunday, which he shot near HARTWICK's hill, just a few miles east of town. (18 Nov 1915)

-Mr. and Mrs. Glenn OWENS are entertaining the latter's sister, Miss Cecil LaRUE of Detroit, for several weeks. (12 Oct 1916)

-A baby son Glenn, Jr. was born to Mr. and Mrs. OWENS this morning. (17 Oct 1918)

-Glenn, Jr., the month-old babe of Mr. and Mrs. OWENS passed away eaarly yesterday morning after an attack of bronchial pneumonia, resulting from whooping cough. (14 Nov 1918)

-Mrs. LaRUE of Bay City came yesterday on account of the death of her little grandchild, little son of Mr. and Mrs. Glenn OWEN. (14 Nov 1918)

-Mr. and Mrs. Glen OWEN and two sons left Saturday night for Detroit to visit Mrs. OWEN's parents. Mr. OWEN will return soon after Xman, while the remainder of the family will stay for a longer visit. (25 Dec 1919)

-Mr. and Mrs. Glen OWENS are happy over the arrival of a daughter at their home Saturday evening, June 3. Mother and babe are doing nicely. (8 Jun 1922)

-Glen OWEN went out hunting for a short time Tuesday and returned home with a fine buck. (23 Nov 1922)

-Mr. and Mrs. Glen OWEN are grief-stricken over the death of their eight months old daughter, Cacel Glendolyn, who passed away at their home at six o'clock yesterday morning after a brief illness. Besides the parents the little girl is mourned by two brothers Russell and Nyland. The family have the sympathy of many friends in their sorrow. (1 Feb 1923)

-Glen OWENS expects to leave tonight for Detroit, where he will be employed. His family will follow him as soon as school is out for the summer. (5 Apr 1923)

-Mrs. Glen OWEN and sons, Russell and Nyland left Saturday for Detroit, joining Mr. OWEN, who has been employed in that city for the past couple of months. They disposed of most of their household goods and have rented their home on Ionia Street. Mr. and Mrs. OWEN have many friends, who wish them success in their new home. (21 Jun 1923)

-The home of Glen OWEN and family on Ionia Street, near the Danish gymnasium, was totally distroyed by fire Sunday night. Also a quanity of the furnature was burned.
The family has been in Detroit since school closed in June and just how, the fire originated is a mystery to the firemen. It was discovered at about 11:30 p.m. in the woodshed which is part of the building where it had a fair chance to start.
The building was insured for $1,000. Also there was $1,000 insurance on the household goods. The piano, phonograph and considerable of the other furnature was saved. (12 Jul 1923)

-Glen OWEN arrived from Detroit yesterday morning owing to his home being destroyed by fire Sunday night. (12 Jul 1923)

-Glen OWEN, who has been seriously ill with pneumonia in Detroit, is reported to be on the road to recovery. (21 Jan 1924)

-Mr. and Mrs. Glen OWEN and three children of Detroit are visiting at the home of the foermer's sister, Mrs. H. C. SCHMIDT this week, coming in time for the Forth of July celebration. (8 Jul 1928)

-Mrs. Glen OWENS and little son of Detroit are visiting at the home of Mr. and Mrs. Holger SCHMIDT. The OWENS family were former residents of Grayling. leaving here five years ago. (11 Jul 1929)

-Remains of Mrs. Lottie WARNER Brot Here for Interment.
Passed Away Friday in Bay City after Short Illness.
Mrs. Lottie WARNER, sister of Mrs. Holger SCHMIDT passed away at Mercy Hospital in Bay City Friday night after a short illness. Mrs. WARNER was stricken with illness at her home Wednesday and lapsed into a coma and never regained consciousness. Mrs. SCHMIDT was called to her bedside and was with her when she passed away.
The funeral was held Sunday with services at the WARNER home and Monday the remains were brought to Grayling and interred in Elmwood cemetery beside the remains of the desceased's parents, the late Mr. and Mrs. George F. OWEN.
Mrs. WARNER was formerly Lottie OWEN and was born in Ortonville, and her girlhood was spent in Lovells and Grayling. Surviving are two children, Edwina, age 13 Ray, 11, also three brothers and one sister, Ray and Glen OWEN, Detroit, Charles of Maple Forest and Mrs. Holger SCHMIDT of Grayling, all of whom have the sympathy of many friends in their sorrow. (23 Jul 1931)

-Mr. and Mrs. Howard SCHMIDT, Mr. and Mrs. Glen OWENS and Ray WARNER, of Detroit, and A. H. MAXSON of Flint were week end guests of Mr. and Mrs. H. C. SCHMIDT. Miss Marie SCHMIDT, of Detroit, who accompanied them, is remaining for a few weeks visit. (17 Jun 1937)

-Jack OWEN returned Saturday to his home in Lincoln Park Mich., after spending two weeks vacation at the farm home of his uncle Charles OWEN. The young man is the son of Glen OWEN who formerly resided in Grayling. (29 Jul 1937)


Maudie LARUE

The following information extracted from the Grayling, Crawford Co., MI Newspaper Avalanche. NOTE: The date at the end of each extract indicates the date of the publication:
-Married in St. Mary's rectory, July 1, Mr. Glenn OWEN and Maudie LaRUE, both of Grayling. Rev. J. J. RIESS officiating. (4 Jul 1912)

-Mrs. Glen OWENS and children left last Friday afternoon for Bay City to visit relatives and friends for several days. (10 Jun 1915)

-Mr. and Mrs. Glenn OWENS are entertaining the latter's sister, Miss Cecil LaRUE of Detroit, for several weeks. (12 Oct 1916)

-Miss Lucy LaRUE of Bay City is visiting her sister Mrs. Glenn OWENS foa week. (29 Aug 1918)

-Miss Cecil LaRUE of Bay City is visiting her sister Mrs. Glenn OWENS for a few days. (28 Nov 1918)

-Miss Cecil LaRUE returned Saturday to her home in Bay City after an extended visit with her sister Mrs. Glenn OWEN. (12 Dec 1918)

-Miss Cecil LaRUE returned here Friday to care for the Glenn OWEN's family, who are ill with the influenza. Miss LaRUE is a trained nurse and has been here on a visit to her sister returning to her home the fore part of this week, only to have to come back to care for the sick. The family are getting along nicely. (19 Dec 1918)

-Mrs. LaRUE of Bay City is here caring for the Glenn OWENS family, Miss Cecil LaRUE of the A.R.C. having been called to duty in a hospital in Idaho. The latter left the latter part of the week. (26 Dec 1918)

-Mr. and Mrs. Glen OWENS are happy over the arrival of a daughter at their home Saturday evening, June 3. Mother and babe are doing nicely. (8 Jun 1922)

-Mrs. Glen OWEN and three children returned Sunday morning from a month's visit in Detroit. They were accompanied home by Mrs. OWEN's sister and husband, Mr. and Mrs. Daniel LEE, of Detroit, who will be guests at the OWEN home for a couple of weeks. Mrs. LEE was formerly Miss Viva LaRUE. (24 Aug 1922)

-Mrs. Glen OWENS was called to Detroit Tuesday by the death of a brother. (11 Jan 1923)

-Mrs. Glen OWENS was tendered a pleasant surprise party by her neighbors and friends Sunday evening. While she was calling on a friend, the crowd gathered at her home and on her return she was given the surprise. A social evening was spent visiting, and a pot luck lunch was served. It was the birthday anniversary of the guest of honor, and she was presented with a beautiful ivory clock as a rememberance of the occasion. The evening was much enjoyed by all present. (26 Apr 1923)

-Mrs. Glen OWEN and sons, Russell and Nyland left Saturday for Detroit, joining Mr. OWEN, who has been employed in that city for the past couple of months. They disposed of most of their household goods and have rented their home on Ionia Street. Mr. and Mrs. OWEN have many friends, who wish them success in their new home. (21 Jun 1923)


Russell L. OWEN

The following information extracted from the Grayling, Crawford Co., MI Newspaper Avalanche. NOTE: The date at the end of each extract indicates the date of the publication:
-Mr. and Mrs. Glen OWEN are grief-stricken over the death of their eight months old daughter, Cacel Glendolyn, who passed away at their home at six o'clock yesterday morning after a brief illness. Besides the parents the little girl is mourned by two brothers Russell and Nyland. The family have the sympathy of many friends in their sorrow. (1 Feb 1923)

-Mrs. Glen OWEN and sons, Russell and Nyland left Saturday for Detroit, joining Mr. OWEN, who has been employed in that city for the past couple of months. They disposed of most of their household goods and have rented their home on Ionia Street. Mr. and Mrs. OWEN have many friends, who wish them success in their new home. (21 Jun 1923)


Nyland F. OWEN

The following information extracted from the Grayling, Crawford Co., MI Newspaper Avalanche. NOTE: The date at the end of each extract indicates the date of the publication:
-Mr. and Mrs. Glen OWEN are grief-stricken over the death of their eight months old daughter, Cacel Glendolyn, who passed away at their home at six o'clock yesterday morning after a brief illness. Besides the parents the little girl is mourned by two brothers Russell and Nyland. The family have the sympathy of many friends in their sorrow. (1 Feb 1923)

-Mrs. Glen OWEN and sons, Russell and Nyland left Saturday for Detroit, joining Mr. OWEN, who has been employed in that city for the past couple of months. They disposed of most of their household goods and have rented their home on Ionia Street. Mr. and Mrs. OWEN have many friends, who wish them success in their new home. (21 Jun 1923)


Glen OWEN Jr.

The following information extracted from the Grayling, Crawford Co., MI Newspaper Avalanche. NOTE: The date at the end of each extract indicates the date of the publication:
-A baby son Glenn, Jr. was born to Mr. and Mrs. OWENS this morning. (17 Oct 1918)

-Glenn, Jr., the month-old babe of Mr. and Mrs. OWENS passed away early yesterday morning after an attack of bronchial pneumonia, resulting from whooping cough. (14 Nov 1918)

-Mrs. LaRUE of Bay City came yesterday on account of the death of her little grandchild, little son of Mr. and Mrs. Glenn OWEN. (14 Nov 1918)


Cacel Glendolyn OWEN

The following information extracted from the Grayling, Crawford Co., MI Newspaper Avalanche. NOTE: The date at the end of each extract indicates the date of the publication:
-Mr. and Mrs. Glen OWENS are happy over the arrival of a daughter at their home Saturday evening, June 3. Mother and babe are doing nicely. (8 Jun 1922)

-Mr. and Mrs. Glen OWEN are grief-stricken over the death of their eight months old daughter, Cacel Glendolyn, who passed away at their home at six o'clock yesterday morning after a brief illness. Besides the parents the little girl is mourned by two brothers Russell and Nyland. The family have the sympathy of many friends in their sorrow. (1 Feb 1923)


Jack OWEN

The following information extracted from the Grayling, Crawford Co., MI Newspaper Avalanche. NOTE: The date at the end of each extract indicates the date of the publication:
-Jack OWEN returned Saturday to his home in Lincoln Park Mich., after spending two weeks vacation at the farm home of his uncle Charles OWEN. The young man is the son of Glen OWEN who formerly resided in Grayling. (29 Jul 1937)

-Mrs. Holger SCHMIDT left for Detroit Wednesday night to attend the funeral of her nephew Jack OWEN, age 13 years, and youngest son of Mr. and Mrs. Glenn OWEN. The boy passed away Tuesday following a lingering illness. The family formerly resided in Grayling and have tghe sympathy of friends in their bereavement. (8 Jun 1939)


Mrs. Regula HOESLI

The following information extracted from the Grayling, Crawford Co., MI Newspaper Avalanche. NOTE: The date at the end of each extract indicates the date of the publication:
-P. AEBLI received the sad new from Switzerland of the death of his mother-in-law, Mrs. Regula HOESLI, aged 81 years. The old lady was the last one of the family. Her husband and children preceeding her in death. (3 May 1906)


Mrs. Cletus St. Pierre

The following information extracted from the Grayling, Crawford Co., MI Newspaper Avalanche. NOTE: The date at the end of each extract indicates the date of the publication:
-Fred AEBLI, Jr. and sister Beatrice of Bay City are visiting their aunt Mrs. Cletus St. PIERRE for a few weeks. (14 Aug 1924)


Nancy SHOPPENAGONS

The following information extracted from the Grayling, Crawford Co., MI Newspaper Avalanche. NOTE: The date at the end of each extract indicates the date of the publication:
-THE REUNION
Otsego and Crawford Counties Soldiers' and Sailors' Reunion was held at Grayling on Tuesday and Wednesday of this week, and was largely attended.
The fine day was filled up in getting together from various parts of the two counties, taking a late dinner on the camp ground, and in a body marching to the Hall and attending the funeral services of Nancy SHOPPENNEGONS, a native Indian of this place, and daughter of David SHOPPENNEGONS, well known in this part of the state. (8 Sep 1881)

- OBITUARY
Early Tuesday morning, after a lingering illness, Nancy, eldest daughter of David SHOPPENNEGONS (Indian) passed into eternity. Consumption in its most dreaded form claims another victim. For two years this dread disease had been at work. It practiced its usual deception, making her friends think at times that long life was in store for her; but their hopes were built on the sand. About two weeks ago she began to fail rapidly, when Dr. DAVIS was called in, but skill was of no avail, death was too near. Still she clung to the fond hope that she might be spared. On Saturday last her hopes vanished; she saw she must die. In the evening at her own request several kind ladies came and sung to her, and she listened with manifest pleasure to words from the "Good Book." For the next two days the fight went on - life, and death struggling for supremacy. Her strength ended on Tuesday morning. She was conscious to the very last, talking as much as her feebleness would allow to all who came to see her. Death had no terrors for her, for as she passed "through the valley" her Saviour was with her, the "sting of death" she felt not. Her life was short, only 23 years, yet short as it was, 'twas' not a failure. For seven years she strived to live a Christian life, and the life of a Christian is never a failure. She died trusting in Jesus; for her heavy cross of suffering she has received the crown of Righteousness. "Her end was pease."
"How blest the righteous when he dies;
How sinks the weary soul to rest:
So fades a summer cloud away;
So sinks the gale when storms are o'er'
So gently shuts the eye of day;
So dies a wave along the shore."

The following are her last words, as penned by her younger sister, Hattie:
"These words are beautiful in the way to Heaven are going, and it is good to give your heart to Jesus. His blessing is brighter than a fire, and I see how God bless the people. I am sorrow. I wish I seen Mrs. L. J. TRYON, but my talking was gone. May God bless all the people, and I wish they would kneel down a ask Jesus to save them. I am not sorrow to go, because there is plenty of ministers let God word be all over. Whoever does what God says shall see me in Heaven, my happy home, where no more sorrow and suffering, no more crying tears shall be wiped forever." (8 Sep 1881)


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