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The Avalanche The Ward Family Web Pages

Extractions From the "Avalanche" a Crawford Co., MI Newspaper 1879-1940's

Notes


WESCOTT

The following information extracted from the Grayling, Crawford Co., MI Newspaper Avalanche. NOTE: The date at the end of each extract indicates the date of the publication:
-Mr. WESCOTT of Detroit, father of Mrs. Charles OWEN, has purchased the Archie HOWSE farm in maple Forest township. Mr. and Mrs. OWEN will operate the farm. This is one of the best farms in Crawford county and has always yielded good productions. There are comfortable farm buildings as well as excellent land. Mr. HOWSE came to this region about 40 years ago, most of which time he has spent on this farm. We haven't learned definitely just what he intends to do, since his retirement from agricultural pursuits, but he and his family will bear the best wishes from their many Crawford county friends. We also wich good luck to the new owners. (29 Jul 1926)


Daniel LEE

The following information extracted from the Grayling, Crawford Co., MI Newspaper Avalanche. NOTE: The date at the end of each extract indicates the date of the publication:
-Mrs. Glen OWEN and three children returned Sunday morning from a month's visit in Detroit. They were accompanied home by Mrs. OWEN's sister and husband, Mr. and Mrs. Daniel LEE, of Detroit, who will be guests at the OWEN home for a couple of weeks. Mrs. LEE was formerly Miss Viva LaRUE. (24 Aug 1922)


Viva LARUE

The following information extracted from the Grayling, Crawford Co., MI Newspaper Avalanche. NOTE: The date at the end of each extract indicates the date of the publication:
-LOVELL'S LOCALS - Miss Viva LaRUE spent the past week in Grayling visiting friends and incidentally having some dentistry done. (31 Aug 1911)

-Viva LaRUE, of Grayling, is now assistant to Mrs. MARSH at C. W. WARD's summer home. (21 Sep 1911)

-Mrs. Glen OWEN and three children returned Sunday morning from a month's visit in Detroit. They were accompanied home by Mrs. OWEN's sister and husband, Mr. and Mrs. Daniel LEE, of Detroit, who will be guests at the OWEN home for a couple of weeks. Mrs. LEE was formerly Miss Viva LaRUE. (24 Aug 1922)


Rasmus HANSON

The following information extracted from the Grayling, Crawford Co., MI Newspaper Avalanche. NOTE: The date at the end of each extract indicates the date of the publication:
-COUNTY OFFICIALS
Sheriff - David LONDON
Clerk & Resigter - William R. STECKERT
Treasurer - Rasmus HANSON
Prosecuting Attorney - J. O. HADLEY
Judge of Probate - Dan WALDRON
Circuit Court Com'r - Co. W. WIGHT
Surveyor - Frederick LARKER
Coroners - Samuel REVEL, William H. SHERMAN. (14 May 1879)

-On Wednesday, June 21st, 1882, to Mr. and Mr. R. HANSON, a son. (29 Jun 1882)

-On Tuesday, Aug. 15, 1882 in this village, the infant chld of Mr. and Mrs. R. H. HANSON. (17 Aug 1882).

-BIRTHS - On Monday, Feb. 19, 1883, to Mr. and Mrs. Rasmus HANSON, a daughter. (22 Feb 1883)

-Miss Hannah HANSON, of Manistee, is a guest of Mr. and Mrs. R. HANSON. Miss HANSON is a sister to Mr. HANSON. (12 Jul 1883)

-Mr. and Mrs. R. HANSON desire us to express their thanks to the citizens of Grayling, for the attention, kindness and sympathy shown them in their late bereavement. (14 Aug 1884).

-DIED - On the 7th inst., Charlie C. infant son of Mr. and Mrs. Rasmus HANSON, of this city, aged 5 weeks. (14 Aug 1884).

-BORN-On the 26th inst., in Grayling, Mrs. R. H. HANSON, a son. (28 Aug 1884)

-The infant child of R. H. HANSON, died on Saturday evening, and was buried Sabbath afternoon. (11 Sep 1884)

-SALLING, HANSON & CO.
The most important industry of the place, because the largest, is the establishment of Salling, Hanson & Co., a firm composed of E. N. SALLING, of Manistee, and R. HANSON and N. MICHELSON, resident partners. Their plant at this place consists of a saw mill, of latest style with a capacity of 85,000 feet per day; a first class planing mill, with a large combined Wood planer, a Fay planer and the usual accompaniment of siding saws, rip saws, moulding machinery, etc., and in connection have erected a dry kiln of the J. R. RUNDELL patent, at a cost of $2,000.00, which is a certain guarantee of perfectly dry stock. They also run a shingle mill with a daily capacity of 40 M, and Nov. 1st started a lath mill which has already cut 500,000 feet of lath. the aggregate for the year is over 15,000,000 feet of lumber; 5,000,000 shingles and 500,000 lath. they operate five camps, employing an average of 200 men and cut 25,000,000 feet of logs.
This firm began operations here in 1881 by the purchase of a small mill which had been erected by J. C. GOODALE and have added to and extended their business annually ever since, and as aside from their trade in logs and lumber they conduct the largest general mercantile business between the Saginaw Valley and the Straits. Their first store was 28x80 feet and in 1884 they added on the east 20x80 feet and in the last year have extended the whole 40 feet to the rear. Making their present salesroom and office a double store, 28x120 and 20x120 feet respectively. In addition to accomodate their stock, they have storerooms on railroad as follows: One building 30 1/2 x 162 feet, one 22x 36 1/2 feet and one 22x72 feet and another in the rear of store about 32x40 besides large sheds to cover wagons, sleighs and agricultural implements. their average invoice of their mercantile stock is about 22,000.00 dollars, and sales for 1887 will aggregate over 161,000.00 dollars. Nine clerks are employed and the entire business is as perfectly systematized as tha of any house in the state.
For the protection of their own property they have put in the Holly system of water works at a cost of $5,000.00 and an electric light plant at a cost of $3,000.00. With their public spirit, they did not stop with just what was required for themselves, but added sufficient power, so that both are extended to other parts of the village.
They have added $5,000.000 to their buildings during 1887, and another 5,000.00 dollars to their machinery, and expect to add about the same amount for the ensuring year.
That their residence here is permanent, is established by the fact that Mr. MICHELSON has now the most expensive residence in the place and the plans are perfected and site selected for the residence of Mr. HANSON, which will be built in the early spring, either of which contain too much money to be held as ordinary property for sale. (29 Dec 1887)

-Mr. and Mrs. Rasmus BAY, of Otsego Lake, had the misfortune to lose their child, about one year old by death, last Sunday. The body was brought to Grayling for interment. The funeral services were held at the residence of Mr. R. HANSON, brother of Mrs. Bay. (29 Aug 1889)

-It will be noticed that R. HANSON was elected Alternate delegate at large, at the Republican convention, at Detroit, to attend the National convention at Minneapolis, June 4th. While Mr. HANSON is not a politician in the usual sense of the term, nor seeking political honors, this is, but a fitting recognition of his sterling republicanism, and his reputation as a business man, which his many friends here will be pleased to note. (21 Apr 1892)

-R. HANSON and his mother and Miss Maggie started last Saturday for a three months trip to Denmark and a brief time in the old world. The AVALANCHE wishes them a pleasant journey and safe return. (20 Jun 1895)

-A cablegram from R. HANSON, yesterday announces their safe arrival in the Old World. (27 Jun 1895)

-R. HANSON, with his mother and Miss Maggie are on the ocean to-day, having started for home last Tuesday. They will be celcomed back. (12 Sep 1895)

-R. HANSON and Chief SHOPPENAGANS took in the concatination of the order of Hoo-Hoos, at Detroit, last week. The black cats were numerous, and yowled excessively. (16 Sep 1897)

-R. HANSON was called to Johannesberg, Monday, on account of the death of his brother's wife, Mrs. John HANSON, who moved from here to a farm near that place several years ago. She leaves her husband, one boy four years old, and a pair of twin boys a week old, with many friends to mourn her death. The body will be brought here for burial from the Danish Lutheran Church, at two o'clock, this afternoon. (20 Feb 1902)

-PROBATE NOTICE.
STATE OF MICHIGAN.
THE PROBATE COURT FOR THE COUNTY OF CRAWFORD.
At a session of said court, held at the Probate office, in the village of Grayling, in said county, on the 21st day of March A. D. 1905.
Present: Hon. Wellington BATTERSON
Judge of Probate.
In the matter of the estate of Harvey ANDERSON, a minor.
Rasmus HANSON, guardian of said minor, having filed in said court his final account as guardian of said minor, and his petition praying for the allowance thereof,
It is ordered, that Saturday the 8th day of April A. D. 1905, at ten o'clock in the forenoon, at said probate office be and is hereby appointed for examining and allowing said account.
It is further ordered, that public notice thereof be given by publication of a copy of this order, for three successive weeks previous to said day of hearing, in the Crawford Avalanche a newspaper printed and circulated in said county.
WELLINGTON BATTERSON,
mar23-3w Judge of Probate. (23 Mar 1905)

-Interesting Events in Graylin 23 Years Ago - Thurs. 19 Sep 1907
DIED - Sunday, Sept. 15, in this village, Mrs. Johanna HANSON, aged 86 years. Mrs. HANSON was born in West Kipping, Denmark, in 1821, and came to this country in September, 1880. She leaves two sons, John HANSON and Rasmus HANSON, and three daughters, Mrs. BAY, of Lewiston, Mrs. Anna JOHNSON and Mrs. Mary RASMUSSON, and a host of friends to mourn her loss. Funeral services were held yesterday at the Danish Lutheran Church of which the deceased was an ardent member. (18 Sep 1930)

-Mrs. Ralph E. ROUTIER and son Ralph of Detroit and Mrs. Walter H. WOODSON Jr. of Chapel Hill, North Carolina, were called to Grayling the last of the week by the illness of their grandfather, Rasmus HANSON. (26 May 1927)

-Mr. R. HANSON threw a scare into some of his friends last week when the doctors reported that he was suffering from pneumonia. At the ripe age of 81 years, that disease isn't so easily thrown off, but Mr. HANSON, due to his excellent health, has come through the trouble very nicely and hopes to be able to be out again before very many days. He is able to sit up at this time and is getting along nicely. (26 May 1927)

-R. HANSON and Oscar will sail from New York to Denmark, on the Crown Prince, June 3rd. (29 May 1927)

- R. HANSON PASSED AWAY MONDAY
WAS ONE OF MICHIGAN'S PIONEER LUMBERMEN
FOR HALF A CENTURY DIRECTED GRAYLING'S INDUSTRIES.

Rasmus HANSON, Graylin's best known citizen, passed away peacefully at his home here Monday evening at 9:37 o'clock. He had made a noble fight against an attack of pneumonia, which was the second one this year, but he lacked the strength to recover. He also had been greatly weakened some time ago by a stroke of paralysis. He was 81 years of age.
Although Mr. HANSON's recovery had appeared quite doubtful for several days, still the news of his passing was a very decided shock to the people of this city where he ahd resided for nearly half a century, and it cast a gloom of deep sorrow over its citizens. The news of his passing spread rapidly over the city and messages early announced it to the outside world.
We love to think of Mr. HANSON as we knew him - a keen, intelligent businessman, an indefatigable worker, a loyal citizen and faithful and congenial friend. In early life he had learned the lessons of industry and thrift and by their practice not only built up a very substantial competence but also a large circle of friends among his home citizens, those of his chosen State and country until his acquaintance radiated from his own comfortable domicile to the extreme ends of the earth.
In the obituary of his life that is taken from an autobiographical sketch many things are not mentioned that are of interest and that reflect to his great credit. His love for his chosen country led him to generous acts that are well known to a few of his most intimate friends. And those from among our youths who were privileged to answer the call of patriotism when its country was in need will recall Mr. HANSON's generosity when each and everyone was favored with a check for an amount that might enable him to furnish some of the many personal wants that are known to soldiers and that are not supplied by the Department of war. It made no difference whether a young man answered the draft or if he made voluntary enlistment, he was given a check by Mr. HANSON of $25.00, and if it wasn't given to him before he left he was looked up and the check mailed. This practice was carried out during the war with Spain as well as during the World War.
Mr. HANSON's gift to the State of 15,000 acres at what was then Portage Lake. (now Lake Margrethe) was certainly a crowing event and has proven to be the finest military reservation anywhere in America. This is destined to remain indefinitely a lasting memorial to his philanthrophy. This was followed later by his gift of the officer's beautiful club house which has been used and enjoyed to the fullest by the officers of the guard and others.
During the World War Mr. HANSON not only was generous in his contributions to the war funds of Crawford county but lent his aid to some of the neighboring counties.
And too, those of us upon whom the duties of raising funds for local events and in the making up of just deficits have always found him faithful and ready to respond whenever needed.
While always interested in politics it may truthfully be said of him that he seldom if ever, interferred locally but was willing that the people do the choosing and he was the last to complain should their selections not always have turned out wisely.
In the passing of Mr. HANSON, Grayling is losing one of its most loyal citizens, one who loved his own home city, and a sincere friend.
He was a member of the Danish Lutheran church into which faith he received his baptism early in life. By his wealth he was able to assist his church but his benevolence did not terminate there. All churches in our community profited from his contributions. And Mercy Hospital, one of the finest institutions in Northern Michigan, would never have been instituted except for the financial and moral support he gave it.
OBITUARY
Rasmus HANSON, of the firm of Salling, Hanson & Co., Grayling, Mich., was born at Vester Kipping, Falster, Denmark, Oct. 14, 1846. he attended the common schools until he was 14 years old, and was then confirmed in the Lutheran church. He worked on his father's farm until the fall of 1863, when the war broke out between Denmark and the German confederacy, when, in connection with another party, he started out as an army sutler, but circumstances were unfavorable, and the venture yielded no profits. He returned to his father's farm, but found farm life too slow for his energies, and he finally agreed with his father to imigrate to America. he left his home May 3, 1865, and landed in New York the 15th. He decided to make for th einterior, and located at Racine, Wis., where he hired out on a farm and worked four months. He then went to Manistee, Mich., where he met Mr. B. SWEET on the wharf and hired out at $20.00 per month. In a very short time he worked himself up to the position of foreman for the firm, for whom he continued to work until 1867. Having accumulated a little money, he became associated with Ernest N. SALLING in buying timber and lumbering it and selling the logs, and also getting out logs for other parties. In the fall of 1871 he sold out to ENGLEMAN, BABCOCK & SALLING, and was engaged as woods' manager by this firm, with whom he continued for two years. In the meantime he had associated himself with Nels MICHELSON in jobbing and logging, and after leaving the employ of the former firm he organized the firm of MICHELSON, HANSON & Co., which in 1873 was merged in the new firm of R. HANSON & Co. This firm continued to operate until the spring of 1878, when the name was changed to SALLING, HANSON & Co., Mr. Salling having joined the new firm. This firm began operations at Graying, putting logs into the Manistee river and selling them to parties at Manistee. In 1882 the firm commenced to manufacture lumber of its own, an dbought out a small sawmill, which in 1899, was superseded by a new mill with a capacity of 20,000,000 feet a year. In 1892 a band mill and planing mill were added. The firm owned a large amount of pine, and hardwood timber covering about 60,000 acres. In 1900 the firm began the erection of a hardwood mill at Johannesburg. Mr. HANSON was also a member of the MICHELSON & HANSON Lumber Co., of Lewiston, Mich., having mills at Lewiston and at SALLINGS. He was a director of this company and general manager of his own company. He also helped to organize the Michigan Sugar Company, the first sugar company organized in Michigabn, and also in Bay City Sugar Co., in both of which he was director, and was interested in the Crawford County Exchange Bank and other commercial and financial enterprizes.
Mr. HANSON was a Republican, but disagreed with the party as to the treatment of the new possessions. He was an alternate to the Minneapolis convention in 1892 and a member of the Michigan Electorial College in 1896. He was elected the first county treasurer of Crawford county in 1880 and received the entire vote of his township. He was a member of the local school board for 15 years, was a 32nd degree Mason, and was a member of the National Associations, of the Michigan Club, the Hoo Hoos, etc.
Mr. HANSON was married Sept. 17, 1867, to Miss Margrethe HANSON, and their five children are Matilda, wife of H. A. BAUMAN; Margrethe, wife of J. Sidney GRAHAM; Thorwald W.; Esbern and Oscar.
Mr. HANSON also re-organized the German American Sugar Company and served a President for two years, but on account of his extensive lumbering business, he was unable to continue so he sold part of his stock but continued a director of the company. He aslo organized the Grayling Lumber Company, located at Monroe, Louisiana. He also organized the L. JENSON Lumber Company, doing business at Ewen, Michigan, in the upper peninsula on the South Shore & Atlantic Railroad. He also became a stockholder in the Diamond Lumber Company doing business at Green Bay, Wisconsin. He organized the R. HANSON & Sons Lumber Company, Sept. 16, 1908, and also organized the HANSON Land Company, Sept. 16, 1908. He was managing director and treasurer in both of these last concerns. His stock in the L. JENSON Lumber Company he sold in the spring of 1918. He was also stockholder in a great many other companies: The American Car & Foundry, the N.Y. C. R.R., the Penna R. R., United States Steel and several others.
He was one of the organizers of the Grayling Box Co., that is now successfully operating and also of the Grayling Development Co., that is busy drilling for oil.
A much appreciated gift to the Danish citizens was the erection of beautiful Danebod Hall, where a touch of their native land might be kept sweet in their memories. This charming place has fulfilled many needs both to the Danish societies and to other citizens of Grayling as well. In presenting it to his countrymen Mr. HANSON stated that all he requested in return was that "they use it."
FUNERAL THURSDAY AFTERNOON
The funeral is being held this afternoon. At 2 o'clock services are being held in thge home and conducted by Rev. Peter KJOLHEDE, pastor of the Danish Lutheran church. At 2:30 o'clock services will be held at the Michelson Memorial church and be conducted by Rev. J. W. GREENWOOD, pastor. The remains will be laid to rest in the family burial vault at Elmwood cemetery.
Grayling schools will close this afternoon and the business plances between the hours of 1:30 and 4:30 o'clock as a fitting tribute of the honor in which Mr. HANSON was held at home.
The grandchildren of the family, Mrs. Ralph ROUTIER, Detroit; Mrs. Walter WOODSON, Salisbury, N.C., Junior HANSON, St. Johns Military Academy, Wis., and Misses Margrethe and Ella HANSON, Bennett School, New York City; Virginia HANSON at school in Chicago; are home to attend the funeral. Also Mrs. Rasmus BAY of Montana, sister of Mr. HANSON, has arrived and stockholders of the SALLING, HANSON co. and many friends will no doubt be here for the funeral.
----------------
It is with the deepest sincerity that we extend to Mrs. HANSON and the family our sympathy in this their greatest hour of sorrow, and we are certain that such sentiment is in the hearts of their home friends. (3 Nov 1927)

- R. HANSON, LUMBERMAN, LAID TO REST
Funeral Thursday Lagest In Grayling's History
Inspiring Tribute Paid To Mr. HANSON by Rev. GREENWOOD.

No October son or October day was ever more beautiful than that of last week Thursday, when the remains of our leading and highly revered citizen, Rasmus HANSON, were laid to rest. Only the sadness of the occasion marred the peace of the folk of this community.
Sevices were conducted at the family home by Rev. Peter KJOLHEDE, pastor of the Danish Lutheran church, of which Mr. HANSON was a member. The sermon was preached in the Danish language and was listened to by a large concourse of Danish citizens and a few near friends.
At 2:00 o'clock the funeral cortege moved to the MICHELSON Memorial church, which was filled to overflowing, many being unable to get into the auditorium. Mrs. CLIPPERT presided at the organ and while the people were being seated softly playing "Lead Kindly Light."
The casket was borne by six men, all old employees of the SALLING HANSON Co. Mills - Charles TROMBLE, Lars NELSON, Frank AHMAN, Glaf SORENSON, T. BOESON and Chris JOHNSON.
Mrs. Carl P. MICKELSON of Mason, sang in her own sympathetic manner, "My Task," and was followed by a brief prayer by the pastor.
The casket was covered by a blanket of American Beauty roses and scores of floral wreaths and streamers covered the pulpit platform, and spoke eloquently of the esteem in which Mr. HANSON was held by his immense circle of friends - silent tributes of sympathy and kindliness. And telegrams and letters were received by Mrs. HANSON and her family by the score, assuring the deepest sympathy and tending to alleviate their sorrow.
THE SERMON
Rev. GREENWOOD spoke from the text 1st Corinthians, 16th Chapter, 13th and 14th Verses, and gave one of the finest sermons we have ever listened to. It was in part as follows:
Quit Yourselves Like Men; Be Strong,
1. Cor. XVI. 13-14.
In Alfred TENNYSON's matchless poem entitled "Ode on the Death of the Duke of Wellington," there is an unusual line which not only shows us the muscular faith which was TENNYSON's, but splendidly describes the life of a great and vigorous personality. "He is gone who seemed so great, - Gone! - but nothing can bereave him of the force he mad ehis own, and we belive him something far advanced in state, and that he wears a truer crown, than any crown that man can weave him."
The more I have thought of the lite of our aged patriarchy whose passing leaves a loneness in our community life, and whose years have kept step with Nature's changes, - and at the time when gaunt, grey trees, stand out against an autumn sky, has ripened with thge leaves unto death, the more I have felt the appropriateness of the line - "Nothing can bereave him of th eforce he made his own," as applicable to this great pioneer of our Michigan North-land.
To meet him and to converse with him was to be aware of that ruggedness of manhood and that characteristic challenge to difficulties which had been so frequently eloquent in the lives of the successful lumbermen of Michigan. It may be that our very environment and circumstances, - men who have been mastered by their environment. Whereas, a strong soul, with inherent qualities of character that make for victory, overcome circumstances, and create a new environment. Such was he!
The pioneer conditions which he faced in this North, were his challenge. He had a vision that lured him on. He was determined to make his obstacles, stepping stones. One is reminded of BROWNING's advice when he writes - "Then welcome each rebuff, that turns earth's smoothness rough. Each sting that bids nor sit nor stand, but go! Be our joys three parts pain! Strive and hold cheap the strain! Learn, nor account the pang; dare, never grudge the throe."
And so it seems that his most urgent message to us has been given to us, not in eloquent words, but in a vigorous and victorious life. His message is a message summoning us to a conquering manhood, - calling us to a life that meets and masters difficulties.
Where then can we selcet a message from the book of great men, and great messages, more appropriate in conveying that sentiment to us than the words of St. Paul to the pioneering saints at Corinth - "Quit yourselves like men - be strong!" A timely illustration of the force of this text is to be found in the recent narrative of George CLARK, as he tells of the ays of his youth. He was summoned to his father's private office. "My knock was answered by a 'Come in.' I entered and father drew me towards the window. Silently we stood there, and then, strangest of all strange things, I noticed tears in his eyes. Then, when he put his hands on my shoulders, there was a break in his voice as he uttered the words never to be forgotten: - "Well, my son, you are the first to leave the home nest, and I have been praying God to give me the right words to say to you, and I think He has answered my prayer. God grant that you may always try to be a man." And then - he said no more.
Carlyle has given us the caption - Heroes and Hero-worship. Sometimes, I wonder if we ever get beyond that. How much of our departed brother's courage was due to the Worlds Hero. For before the world there stands in all of his manly vigor, - in all of his triumphant splendor, - the perfect man! Who can estimate how much of our strength is an imparted strength - how much of our courage is an imparted courage? For no one has appeared, doth appear, nor will appear, who reveals to us so splendidly the grandeur of the common life - the urgency of the daily duty done well - as does the conquering Galilean!
Such a manhood is portrayed in that dream of chivalry embodied in that superb personage - King Arthur, and in the gorgeous Knights about the Round Table. TENNYSON has King Arthur say "I made them lay their hands in mine, and swear, to reverence the King as if he were their conscience, and their conscience as their King. To break the heathen and uphold for Christ. To ride abroad redressing human wrongs, to speak no slander, nor to listen to it. To honor his own word as if His God's."
But hyou and I can nver live manly lives unless we discover great principles by which a manly life is steered. To think of Mr. HANSON is to think of that principal of magnanimity which was constantly in evidence. By it, we mean the habit of taking the large-minded view of things. To succeed in business, and kind of constructive task, we must avoid that which tends to contract us - that which dulls our moral sense. Nothing is more important than to have a philosophy of life which sees afaroff that Devine event to which the Whole creation moves. That does not become alarmed over the paltry and the minor things in life. That faith which says, - "My heart if fixed, O God! So often we lose our course because we do not take the long-range view of life. We allow temperament and habit to sway us from our course, forgetting that vision and will, will always open up a new way to the resolute soul.
And then we were led to admire his sincereity of purpose. He may often have been misunderstood. But to know him intimately in private fashion was to be aware of an openness of heart and a singleness of mind. The business world will always find a place in its ranks for a straight forward citizen. The world always pays large dividends to the sincere man - in that inner heart content that makes for an open countenance - in that fellowship of friends, and in the material rewards of life.
But the story of his early life in Michigan, of his long exzhausting marches through this forest primeval on foot, of the hardships, and dangers, is a story that reveals the courage of this dauntless heart. It is the story of how a man can throw his powers up against the rawness of nature, and conquer. It is another story in that long record of achievement when God commanded man to have dominion over all things. 'Twas not a mere physical courage which was his, But rather that moral courage which drives men on and on - even when the body can go no further. To the last he possessed this driving force of an indomitable spirit. The body broken and disease making its desperate ravages, but from that bed, he was determined to be about the task which summoned him. Only those who watched with him could persuade him to rest.
And so in patience he rested and Death was kind in the sleep which preceded his final triumph.
As citizens of Grayling, we owe much to this pioneer. Sometimes thoughtless hands may have taken the gifts of his kindly heart, not fully appreciating the spirit of the giver. But today we pause and remember. And in our remembering, his heart is gladdened. That to him, would be satisfactory compensation.
But we can best show our affection for him by building a greater Grayling upon the foundation which he has laid. He has made his contribution. We, too, must make ours. The torch, from his failing hands has been thrust into our hands. Be ours to hold it high.
To me, his silent voice becomes vocal once more and that courage - our spirit speaks to us in notes of old time challenge.
"Be strong - we are not here to play, to dream, to drift. We have hard work to do, and loads to lift - shun not the struggle, face it, 'Tis God's gift, be strong! Be strong."
Say not the days are evil - who's to blame? And fold thy hands and acquiesce, O shame! Stand up, speak out and bravely, in God's name. Be strong - be strong!
To us is left the Task! To him, the glory of the song!
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At the grave Rev. KJOHEDE conducted the burial service and was assisted by a choir of several voices. The message and songs were given in Danish. The several services were filled with tender sympathy and each was beautiful.
Interment was in the family mosleum at Elmwood cemetery that had been prepared years ago. Although it had been Mr. HANSON's request that there be no flowers, the base of the mosleum was literally covered with beautiful floral pieces and wreaths.
Among those from out of the city present at the funeral were as follows:
O. S. HAWES, Harry KANOUSE, Mr. and Mrs. F. C. BURDEN, Ralph ROUTIER, Mr. and Mrs. A. E. MICHELSON, Mr. and Mrs. F. L. MICHELSON, Mr. and Mrs. J. W. HARTWICK, Mr. and Mrs. George MANTZ, Detroit.
Mr. and Mrs. John YUILL, Vanderbilt
Herman LUNDEN, Gaylord
Mr. and Mrs. Wilhelm RAAE, Mr. and Mrs. Fred LARSON, Guy PETERSON, Johannesburg.
General Guy M. WILSON, Flint.
Col. LeRay PEARSON, Lansing.
Rev. Fr. DUNNIGAN, Flint.
Col. J. S. BERSEY, Lansing.
Major ROSENCRANS, Lansing.
Mr. KELLY, Aide to General WILSON, Flint.
Mr. and Mrs. E. J. CORNWELL, W. H. WALLACE, George B. MORLEY, A. W. SEEly, W. B. MERSHON Sr., W. B. MERSHON Jr., Mr. SHORTS, Siginaw.
Mr. and Mrs. T. H. WALLACE, Cass City.
Mrs. Roy BRICKER, Royal Oak.
Mrs. William J. WOODFIELD, Mrs. Frank BARNARD, Mrs. Edward JONES, Miss Carrie JOHNSON, Carl and Marius HANSON, Flint.
Mr. and Mrs. Thomas WOODFIELD, Harvey WOODFIELD, Jackson.
Mr. and Mrs. C. C. WESCOTT, Ypsilanti.
Mrs. E. E. HARTWICK, Ann Arbor.
Mr. and Mrs. Carl P. MICKELSON, Miss Francis MICKELSON, Mason.
Mr. and Mrs. C. A. CAMPBELL, Indian River.
R. C. MUNDY, Mr. BOYCE, John C. ROSS, Bay City.
Mrs. Rasmus BAY, Corvallis, Mont.
O. B. MARTIN, Cheboygan.
Hon Nelson SHARPE, chief justice Michigan Supreme Court, Lansing.
Amos BUCK, Norman VALLAD, Michelson.
Grant E. SALISZBURY, Gordon C. McDONALD, Bay City.
Herman DUDD, Vanderbilt.
James MULHALL, Owosso. (10 Nov 1927)


Margrethe HANSON

The following information extracted from the Grayling, Crawford Co., MI Newspaper Avalanche. NOTE: The date at the end of each extract indicates the date of the publication:
-Interesting Items of News Gathered From the Files of the Avalanche on 23 Years ago - Thursday, June 3, 1915
Mrs. Henry BAUMAN, Mrs. R. HANSON, Miss Margrethe HANSON and Mrs. O. W. HANSON will leave the last of the week for Boston and Auburndale, Mass., to attend the commencement exercises of Lasell Seminary, when Miss Margrethe BAUMAN will graduate from the institution. Miss Helen BAUMAN is also a student at the seminary. (2 Jun 1938)

-Interesting Items of News Gathered From the Files of the Avalanche on 23 Years ago - Thursday, September 23, 1915
Miss Helen BAUMAN returned to Auberndale, Mass., Monday to resume her studies in the LaSalle seminary. Her mother and Mrs. R. HANSON accompanied her as far as Detroit. (22 Sep 1938)

-T. W. HANSON, accompanied by his mother, Mrs. Rasmus HANSON, left Wednesday for Detroit where they will meet Miss Virginia, who will be leaving that city for Poughkeepsie, New York this week where she will attend Vassar College for her second year. (18 Sep 1930)

-Eighty-Eight Useful Years
Mrs. Rasmus Hanson Celebrates Birthday
To live in one place for fifty-five years and to be held throughout that time in affection and high esteem by an entire community, is a record which few may boast.
Grayling's Grand Old Lady, Mrs. Rasmus HANSON, reached her eighty-eighth birthday September seventh. Friends and relatives gathered at her home both afternoon and evening in celebration of the occasion.
Margrethe HANSON came to America from Denmark when she was nineteen years of age. She married Rasmus HANSON in Manistee where she lived until 1878, coming from there to Grayling.
Her guests last Thursday were much interested in her reminiscences of those early days. Nels MICHELSON described Grayling to her as "A hole in the woods" - as indeed it was, a small clearing in Michigan's magnificent tract of pine. Here she found the HARTWICKS, the ROBINSONS, the BABBITS, SHOPPENAGONS, and a few others. Shortly after came her brother John K. HANSON and her cousin Nels MICHELSON with their families.
The journey that she and her three children made to their new home required three days. The train that bore them into Grayling also carried "Aunt Becky" WIGHT, on her way to pioneer at Frederic.
All of Mrs. HANSON's five children reside in Grayling. she has seven grandchildren and two great-grandchildren. Most of these and her god-child, Frances MICKELSON, were with her on her birthday.
Mrs. HANSON's chief interest outside her home is the Lutheran church. Enjoying good health, she still takes part in its activities.
Kindly and generous deeds have never been events in Mrs. HANSON's life. They are so much a part of her daily living that more often than not, these acts are unheralded. For the many fine things done by herself and her late husband, applause was neither invited nor expected.
Best known of their gifts is that of the michigan National Guard encampment ground, and the beautiful club house for officers. They gave the major portion of the building fund for Mercy Hospital, and their subsequent donations to this institution were many and liberal. They were the donors of Danebod. Many an unfortunate would have found life much more difficult but for the generosity of Mr. and Mrs. HANSON.
Many men now prominent in the lumber business in this and other states received their training under Mr. HANSON; and others were helped by him in acquiring education and in establishing their business.
During the war Mrs. HANSON did far more than her "bit". Her knitting needles were plied incessantly and scores of garments were sent by her to the "boys." And since that time knitting has been more than a pastime for her. Many needy, and occasionally others are made happy by her gifts of these warm things. On his recent visit to Grayling Judge Frank BELL proudly displayed a pair of fine woolen socks - the last pair to come off her needles.
During the depression when so many men have been forced to tramp the country. Mrs. HANSON has turned no one from her door. Extra food is kept in readiness for her kitchen callers. A day rarely passes that several do not ask for it. How splendid to so carry on at eighty-eight.
Many indeed are the friends and acquaintances who think of Mrs. HANSON with gratefulness in their hearts. The community is thankful for the years this good woman has spent in its midst, and all join in wishing her many more happy birthdays.
A PHOTO OF MRS. RASMUS HANSON IS ON THIS PAGE. (14 Sep 1933)


Margrethe HANSON

The following information extracted from the Grayling, Crawford Co., MI Newspaper Avalanche. NOTE: The date at the end of each extract indicates the date of the publication:
-Interesting Items of News Gathered From the Files of the Avalanche on 23 Years ago - Thursday, June 3, 1915
Mrs. Henry BAUMAN, Mrs. R. HANSON, Miss Margrethe HANSON and Mrs. O. W. HANSON will leave the last of the week for Boston and Auburndale, Mass., to attend the commencement exercises of Lasell Seminary, when Miss Margrethe BAUMAN will graduate from the institution. Miss Helen BAUMAN is also a student at the seminary. (2 Jun 1938)

-Mrs. Helen ROUTIER of Detroit spent the week end at the summer home of her mother, Mrs. H. A. BAUMAN. She was accompanied home Monday by her aunt, Mrs. Margrethe GRAHAM. (27 Jul 1933)

-Mrs. Margrethe GRAHAM, and nephews, Esbern HANSON Jr. and Ralph ROUTIER left Wednesday for Chicago to visit the Century of Progress. They will return by boat to Mackinac Island, where they will spend a few days before returning home. (10 Aug 1933)

-Mrs. Margrethe GRAHAM returned home this morning after having spent the winter in West Palm Beach, Florida. Before returning home she visited Mr. and Mrs. Walter WOODSON Jr. at their home in Salisbury, N. C., and Mrs. Helen ROUTIER in Detroit. (5 Apr 1934)


Charlie C. HANSON

The following information extracted from the Grayling, Crawford Co., MI Newspaper Avalanche. NOTE: The date at the end of each extract indicates the date of the publication:
-Mr. and Mrs. R. HANSON desire us to express their thanks to the citizens of Grayling, for the attention, kindness and sympathy shown them in their late bereavement. (14 Aug 1884).

-DIED - On the 7th inst., Charlie C. infant son of Mr. and Mrs. Rasmus HANSON, of this city, aged 5 weeks. (14 Aug 1884).


Johanna

The following information extracted from the Grayling, Crawford Co., MI Newspaper Avalanche. NOTE: The date at the end of each extract indicates the date of the publication:
- Sunday, Sept. 15, in this village, Mrs. Johanna HANSON, aged 86 years. Mrs. HANSON was born in West Kipping, Denmark, in 1821, and came to this country in September, 1880. She leaves two sons, John HANSON and Rasmus HANSON, and three daughters, Mrs. BAY, of Lewiston, Mrs. Anna JOHNSON and Mrs. Mary RASMUSSON, and a host of friends to mourn her loss. Funeral services were held yesterday at the Danish Lutheran Church of which the deceased was an ardent member. The large attendance and profuse floral decorations showed the high esteem of her relatives and friends. She is at rest in Elmwood cemetery. (19 Sep 1907)


HANSON

The following information extracted from the Grayling, Crawford Co., MI Newspaper Avalanche. NOTE: The date at the end of each extract indicates the date of the publication:
-Eighty-Eight Useful Years
Mrs. Rasmus Hanson Celebrates Birthday
To live in one place for fifty-five years and to be held throughout that time in affection and high esteem by an entire community, is a record which few may boast.
Grayling's Grand Old Lady, Mrs. Rasmus HANSON, reached her eighty-eighth birthday September seventh. Friends and relatives gathered at her home both afternoon and evening in celebration of the occasion.
Margrethe HANSON came to America from Denmark when she was nineteen years of age. She married Rasmus HANSON in Manistee where she lived until 1878, coming from there to Grayling.
Her guests last Thursday were much interested in her reminiscences of those early days. Nels MICHELSON described Grayling to her as "A hole in the woods" - as indeed it was, a small clearing in Michigan's magnificent tract of pine. Here she found the HARTWICKS, the ROBINSONS, the BABBITS, SHOPPENAGONS, and a few others. Shortly after came her brother John K. HANSON and her cousin Nels MICHELSON with their families.
The journey that she and her three children made to their new home required three days. The train that bore them into Grayling also carried "Aunt Becky" WIGHT, on her way to pioneer at Frederic.
All of Mrs. HANSON's five children reside in Grayling. she has seven grandchildren and two great-grandchildren. Most of these and her god-child, Frances MICKELSON, were with her on her birthday.
Mrs. HANSON's chief interest outside her home is the Lutheran church. Enjoying good health, she still takes part in its activities.
Kindly and generous deeds have never been events in Mrs. HANSON's life. They are so much a part of her daily living that more often than not, these acts are unheralded. For the many fine things done by herself and her late husband, applause was neither invited nor expected.
Best known of their gifts is that of the michigan National Guard encampment ground, and the beautiful club house for officers. They gave the major portion of the building fund for Mercy Hospital, and their subsequent donations to this institution were many and liberal. They were the donors of Danebod. Many an unfortunate would have found life much more difficult but for the generosity of Mr. and Mrs. HANSON.
Many men now prominent in the lumber business in this and other states received their training under Mr. HANSON; and others were helped by him in acquiring education and in establishing their business.
During the war Mrs. HANSON did far more than her "bit". Her knitting needles were plied incessantly and scores of garments were sent by her to the "boys." And since that time knitting has been more than a pastime for her. Many needy, and occasionally others are made happy by her gifts of these warm things. On his recent visit to Grayling Judge Frank BELL proudly displayed a pair of fine woolen socks - the last pair to come off her needles.
During the depression when so many men have been forced to tramp the country. Mrs. HANSON has turned no one from her door. Extra food is kept in readiness for her kitchen callers. A day rarely passes that several do not ask for it. How splendid to so carry on at eighty-eight.
Many indeed are the friends and acquaintances who think of Mrs. HANSON with gratefulness in their hearts. The community is thankful for the years this good woman has spent in its midst, and all join in wishing her many more happy birthdays.
A PHOTO OF MRS. RASMUS HANSON IS ON THIS PAGE. (14 Sep 1933)


Thorwald Wilhelm HANSON

The following information extracted from the Grayling, Crawford Co., MI Newspaper Avalanche. NOTE: The date at the end of each extract indicates the date of the publication:
-Thorwald HANSON caught a trout in the AuSable, last Thursday, that weighed one pound and twelve ounces. (24 May 1894)

-Word is received from T. W. HANSON who was in San Francisco during the Quake. He escaped uninjured but lost all of his baggage. (3 May 1906)

-T. W. HANSON and H. A. BAUMAN are not twins, but are brothers-in-law born on the same day, June 4, 1875. (9 Jun 1910)

-Interesting Events In Grayling 25 Years Ago
On Saturday last Mr. T. HANSON and his sisters, Mrs. BAUMAN and Miss HANSON, gave a picnic at their new cottage at Portage Lake, for the young ladies. (18 Aug 1927)

-T. W. HANSON, accompanied by his mother, Mrs. Rasmus HANSON, left Wednesday for Detroit where they will meet Miss Virginia, who will be leaving that city for Poughkeepsie, New York this week where she will attend Vassar College for her second year. (18 Sep 1930)

-Mrs. Anna J. MEILSTRUP has issued invitations for the marriage of her daughter, Anna Julia, to Thorwald W. HANSON, at the Danish church Tuesday evening, Feb. 22nd. (17 Feb 1910)

-HANSON-MEILSTRUP.
Washington's birthday will long be remembered as the wedding day of two of Grayling's most popular society young people - when Ann Julia MEILSTRUP, daughter of Mrs. A. J. MEILSTRUP became the happy bride of Mr. Thorwald HANSON, eldest son of Mr. and Mrs. Rasmus HANSON.
Miss MEILSTRUP is one of Grayling's most beautiful and accomplished young ladies, whilst the groom, Mr. HANSON is one of the prominent young business men of Grayling as well as of the state; at present he is manager of the Hanson & Sons lumber industry located at "T" Town one mile north of the village.
The wedding ceremony was performed by Rev. KJOLHEDE, in the Danish church which was filled to overflowing by 6:30 p. m. with friends from Grayling and all parts of the state.
The church had been beautifully decorated for the occasion by Boehringer Bros., florists of Bay City, with southern smilax and flowers. A large bell made of smilax and daffodils was suspended over the bridal party.
Mrs. Fred DAFOE of Bay City presided at the organ. Promptly at 7 p.m. to the strains of Mendelsohn's wedding march, the bridal party entered the church and proceeded to the altar.
This was indeed a pretty scene - two little girls, Grace BAUMAN and Lucile HANSON as ribbon bearers, lead the procession, then the two ushers Mr. Axel MICHELSON and Mr. Holger HANSON, followed by the groom attended by his brother Mr. Espern HANSON as best man and the bride attended by her sister, Miss Eleanor MEILSTRUP as maid of honor, followed by the Misses Helen BAUMAN and Cornelia MEILSTRUP as ribbon bearers.
The bride was daintily gowned in white liberty satin, over messaline, en train, with tulle veil fastened with orange blossoms and carried a large boquet of lillies of the valley. The maid of honor wore a yellow crepe de chine over messaline, and carried a bouquet of yellow roses. The ribbon bearers wore dainty white embroidered ressses and carried broad bands of white ribbon making a passage through the aisle for the bridal party.
While the bridal party were at the altar Mrs. Harry DAFOE sung, "How I shall love thee, my Sweetheart, my Wife."
The ceremony used was that of the Danish Lutheran Church.
Immediately after the ceremony a reception followed at Danebod Hall, the library building recently donated to the Danish citizens of Grayling by the groom's father, Mr. Rasmus HANSON. Danebod Hall was brilliantly illuminated and a veritable bower of southern smilax. The front of the stage was banked with palms, screening the Grayling Independent Orchestra, which dispersed music throughout the entire evening. In front of the palms, Mr. and Mrs. HANSON, assisted by the bridal party received the congratulations and best wishes of their many friends.
Mrs. COULSON, caterer of Bay City had charge of the refreshments.
The bridal party was seated at a large round table and the guests at long tables extending the entire length of the dining hall. The tables were decorated with bouquets of daffodils and white carnations, and strewn with smilax and yellow tulips. The refreshments consisting of creamed chicken, fruit salad, wafers, olives, salted nuts, coffee, ice-cream and cake, were delicious and were very daintily served by the following young ladies, friends of the bride: the Misses Ethel TROMBIE, Ruth BARLOW, Elizabeth LANGEVIN, Laura MUNN, Marion SALLING, Marguerite CHAMBERLIN, Bessie McCOLLOUGH, Cornelia PETERSON, and Lillian BATES.
About 10 o'clock Mr. and Mrs. HANSON quietly left the hall to prepare for the train - many of the friends remained and enjoyed themselves informally untill train time - when the bride and groom again appeared on the scene. The bride, who is a decided blond, was becomingly gowned in a Copenhagen blue traveling suit, with velvet turban to match. They left on the midnight train, amid a shower of rice and confetti, on an extended bridal trip to Washington, D. C. Florida dn Cuba, and will be at home to their friends after April 1st in their cozy home known as the Wescott cottage.
If the beautiful winter's day and the happiness and joy that prevailed have any significance, we bespeak for them a happy married life.
The wedding presents were numerous and exceedingly beautiful and valuable, a partial list includes, a complete dinner set of fine Haviland China, a solid mahogany bedstead, several oriental rugs, several mahogony bedstead, several oriental rugs, several mahogony chairs, two beautiful clocks, two beautiful electric library lamps, two handsome large pictures, a large mirror in gilt frame, several cut glass punch bowls of different sizes, a dozen cut glass berry dishes and besides, cut glass vases, jugs; candlesticks and dishes of all kinds and varieties, a generous supply of solid silver knives, forks and spoons, solid silver trays of all descriptions, a solid silver potatoe dish, several casseroles with silver mounting, hand painted game sets, fruit sets and cake plates, a silver pudding dish, a carving set, a Down comfortable, several sets of hand embroidered bed linen and a grand assortment of fine table linen, and many other handsome and useful things to numerous to mention.
The out of town guests were Mrs. Fred DAFOE and Mrs. Harry DEFOE, Mrs. BERRY, Mr. and Mrs. GARLAND< Mr. and Mrs. JENISON, the Misses Vera BALLARD, Grace CUMMINS, Jennie MERCER and Mr. Fred POWRIE of B ay City. Mr. and Mrs. Carl MICKELSON of Mason, Mr. O. S. HAWES, Mr. E. E. HARTWICK and Mrs. HUGHES of Detroit, Mr. Harry KRAUSE of Flint, Mr. and Mrs. KIEL, Mrs. KERRY of Saginaw. Mr. and Mrs. David TROTTER and Mr. and Mrs. RYAN of Toledo. Mr. Frank MICKELSON and Mr. Axle BECKER of Johannesburg, Mr. and Mrs. Hans BEY and Mr. and Mrs. David KNEELAND of Lewiston, Mr. and Mrs. Douglass of Lovells, Miss Nora BUCHANAN of Harrisville, Mr. James MULHALL of Owosso and Dr. and Mrs. C. C. WESCOTT of Salling. (24 Feb 1910)


Anna Julia MEILSTRUP

The following information extracted from the Grayling, Crawford Co., MI Newspaper Avalanche. NOTE: The date at the end of each extract indicates the date of the publication:
-Mrs. Anna J. MEILSTRUP has issued invitations for the marriage of her daughter, Anna Julia, to Thorwald W. HANSON, at the Danish church Tuesday evening, Feb. 22nd. (17 Feb 1910)

-HANSON-MEILSTRUP.
Washington's birthday will long be remembered as the wedding day of two of Grayling's most popular society young people - when Ann Julia MEILSTRUP, daughter of Mrs. A. J. MEILSTRUP became the happy bride of Mr. Thorwald HANSON, eldest son of Mr. and Mrs. Rasmus HANSON.
Miss MEILSTRUP is one of Grayling's most beautiful and accomplished young ladies, whilst the groom, Mr. HANSON is one of the prominent young business men of Grayling as well as of the state; at present he is manager of the Hnson & Sons lumber industry located at "T" Town one mile north of the village.
The wedding ceremony was performed by Rev. KJOLHEDE, in the Danish church which was filled to overflowing by 6:30 p. m. with friends from Grayling and all parts of the state.
The church had been beautifully decorated for the occasion by Boehringer Bros., florists of Bay City, with southern smilax and flowers. A large bell made of smilax and daffodils was suspended over the bridal party.
Mrs. Fred DAFOE of Bay City presided at the organ. Promptly at 7 p.m. to the strains of Mendelsohn's wedding march, the bridal party entered the church and proceeded to the altar.
This was indeed a pretty scene - two little girls, Grace BAUMAN and Lucile HANSON as ribbon bearers, lead the procession, then the two ushers Mr. Axel MICHELSON and Mr. Holger HANSON, followed by the groom attended by his brother Mr. Espern HANSON as best man and the bride attended by her sister, Miss Eleanor MEILSTRUP as maid of honor, followed by the Misses Helen BAUMAN and Cornelia MEILSTRUP as ribbon bearers.
The bride was daintily gowned in white liberty satin, over messaline, en train, with tulle veil fastened with orange blossoms and carried a large boquet of lillies of the valley. The maid of honor wore a yellow crepe de chine over messaline, and carried a bouquet of yellow roses. The ribbon bearers wore dainty white embroidered ressses and carried broad bands of white ribbon making a passage through the aisle for the bridal party.
While the bridal party were at the altar Mrs. Harry DAFOE sung, "How I shall love thee, my Sweetheart, my Wife."
The ceremony used was that of the Danish Lutheran Church.
Immediately after the ceremony a reception followed at Danebod Hall, the library building recently donated to the Danish citizens of Grayling by the groom's father, Mr. Rasmus HANSON. Danebod Hall was brilliantly illuminated and a veritable bower of southern smilax. The front of the stage was banked with palms, screening the Grayling Independent Orchestra, which dispersed music throughout the entire evening. In front of the palms, Mr. and Mrs. HANSON, assisted by the bridal party received the congratulations and best wishes of their many friends.
Mrs. COULSON, caterer of Bay City had charge of the refreshments.
The bridal party was seated at a large round table and the guests at long tables extending the entire length of the dining hall. The tables were decorated with bouquets of daffodils and white carnations, and strewn with smilax and yellow tulips. The refreshments consisting of creamed chicken, fruit salad, wafers, olives, salted nuts, coffee, ice-cream and cake, were delicious and were very daintily served by the following young ladies, friends of the bride: the Misses Ethel TROMBIE, Ruth BARLOW, Elizabeth LANGEVIN, Laura MUNN, Marion SALLING, Marguerite CHAMBERLIN, Bessie McCOLLOUGH, Cornelia PETERSON, and Lillian BATES.
About 10 o'clock Mr. and Mrs. HANSON quietly left the hall to prepare for the train - many of the friends remained and enjoyed themselves informally untill train time - when the bride and groom again appeared on the scene. The bride, who is a decided blond, was becomingly gowned in a Copenhagen blue traveling suit, with velvet turban to match. They left on the midnight train, amid a shower of rice and confetti, on an extended bridal trip to Washington, D. C. Florida dn Cuba, and will be at home to their friends after April 1st in their cozy home known as the Wescott cottage.
If the beautiful winter's day and the happiness and joy that prevailed have any significance, we bespeak for them a happy married life.
The wedding presents were numerous and exceedingly beautiful and valuable, a partial list includes, a complete dinner set of fine Haviland China, a solid mahogany bedstead, several oriental rugs, several mahogony bedstead, several oriental rugs, several mahogony chairs, two beautiful clocks, two beautiful electric library lamps, two handsome large pictures, a large mirror in gilt frame, several cut glass punch bowls of different sizes, a dozen cut glass berry dishes and besides, cut glass vases, jugs; candlesticks and dishes of all kinds and varieties, a generous supply of solid silver knives, forks and spoons, solid silver trays of all descriptions, a solid silver potatoe dish, several casseroles with silver mounting, hand painted game sets, fruit sets and cake plates, a silver pudding dish, a carving set, a Down comfortable, several sets of hand embroidered bed linen and a grand assortment of fine table linen, and many other handsome and useful things to numerous to mention.
The out of town guests were Mrs. Fred DAFOE and Mrs. Harry DEFOE, Mrs. BERRY, Mr. and Mrs. GARLAND< Mr. and Mrs. JENISON, the Misses Vera BALLARD, Grace CUMMINS, Jennie MERCER and Mr. Fred POWRIE of B ay City. Mr. and Mrs. Carl MICKELSON of Mason, Mr. O. S. HAWES, Mr. E. E. HARTWICK and Mrs. HUGHES of Detroit, Mr. Harry KRAUSE of Flint, Mr. and Mrs. KIEL, Mrs. KERRY of Saginaw. Mr. and Mrs. David TROTTER and Mr. and Mrs. RYAN of Toledo. Mr. Frank MICKELSON and Mr. Axle BECKER of Johannesburg, Mr. and Mrs. Hans BEY and Mr. and Mrs. David KNEELAND of Lewiston, Mr. and Mrs. Douglass of Lovells, Miss Nora BUCHANAN of Harrisville, Mr. James MULHALL of Owosso and Dr. and Mrs. C. C. WESCOTT of Salling. (24 Feb 1910)


Esbern R. HANSON

The following information extracted from the Grayling, Crawford Co., MI Newspaper Avalanche. NOTE: The date at the end of each extract indicates the date of the publication:
-Espern HANSON has returned from Johannasburg, and takes the place of Albert GROULEFF as chief woodsman for Salling, Hanson & Co. Mr. GROULEFF has gone to Indiana. Mrs. GROULEFF left for a visit at Manistee, last week. We are sorry to loose them. (18 Apr 1901)

-Born, Monday, June 26th to Mr. and Mrs. Esbern HANSON a 9 pound boy. (29 Jun 1911)

-Mrs. Louis CLEMENT of Salisbury, N.C., a house guest of Mrs. Walter WOODSON, was guest of honor at a lovely bridge party at the summer home of Mrs. Esbern HANSON on Thursday afternoon. High scores were held by Mrs. Ralph ROUTIER and Miss Margrethe BAUMAN, Mrs. CLEMENT receiving the guest prize. (14 Aug 1930)

-Mrs. H. A. BAUMAN, who has been visiting her daughter and grandson, Mrs. Helen ROUTIER and son Ralph, in Detroit for several weeks arrived home Tuesday to spend this week at home with her daughter Miss Margrethe. Her nephew Esbern HANSON Jr., who is employed there by the American Mat Company accompanied her and is visiting his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Esbern HANSON. (22 Mar 1934).

-Mrs. H. A. BAUMAN entertained the HANSON families Friday afternoon at a luncheon at Shoppenagons Inn. Out-of-town guests included Mrs. Walter WOODSON and daughter, Grace Matilda, of Salisbury, N. C.; Mr. and Mrs. Esbern HANSON Jr., of Alma; Misses Ella and Margrethe HaANSON, Lansing; Mrs. Helen ROUTIER, and son, Ralph, of Detroit, and Dick SCHNIEDER, of Saginaw. (31 Dec 1936)


HANSON

The following information extracted from the Grayling, Crawford Co., MI Newspaper Avalanche. NOTE: The date at the end of each extract indicates the date of the publication:
-Born, Monday, June 26th to Mr. and Mrs. Esbern HANSON a 9 pound boy. (29 Jun 1911)


Oscar W. HANSON

The following information extracted from the Grayling, Crawford Co., MI Newspaper Avalanche. NOTE: The date at the end of each extract indicates the date of the publication:
-HANSON-SMITH.
The marriage of Mr. Oscar HANSON, youngest son of Mr. and Mrs. R. HANSON of this village, and Miss Bertha Howard SMITH occured Jan. 30th at the home of the bride's parents in Chatham, Ont.
Immediately after the wedding the bride and groom left for an extended trip to the Pacific coast, visiting San Francisco, Sacremento and many points of interest in California, as well as stopping off at several interesting places en route.
On Tuesday March 5th, they arrived in Grayling where they are planning to make their future home - and will immediately begin housekeeping in a pleasant cottage on Peninsular Ave., formerly known as the WOODWORTH home.
Mr. HANSON has a lucrative position in the office of the Salling, Hanson Co. Mrs. HANSON is not a stranger in Grayling having visited here more or less during the past five years. Her charming manner and courteous ways won for her a host of friends who gladly welcome her return to Grayling.
Tuesday evening, Mrarch 13th. Mr. and Mrs. R. HANSON, in honor of the young couple, tendered a reception to their friends in their beautifuyl and spacious home. About 200 guests were invited - the rooms were brilliantly lighted, the air was redolent with the perfume of flowers and beautiful music was discoursed throughout the entire evening - the happiness that beamed on the countenances of the receiving party was also in evidence among the guests. There was not a dull moment the whole evening.
A delicious and dainty buffet luncheon was served consisting of coffee, angel cake, fruit cake, ice cream, lady fingers and maccaronis.
After re-freshments the guest wended their way to the large dining room where the bride's wedding gifts were displayed. It was a bewildering collection of cut glass, silver and china gifts useful as well as ornamental. Cut glass in profusion, vases, water bottles, water pitchers, tumblers, berry dishes, salad dishes, cut glass of every king and description. Solid silver forks, spoons of all kinds, sugars, and creamers and a large chest of flat silver beautifully engraved with the bride's initials. Then there was a great variety of French and hand painted china, fruit plates, cake plates, bon-bon dishes, chocolate sets, trays, etc, etc. A handsome gold clock, beautiful fancy work, battenburg center pieces, sofa pillows, pictures, and last but not least a very interesting document, a generous number of shares in the Grayling Lumber Co., valued at $1,000 a gift from the groom's father.
Later the gentlemen withdrew to the RATHS kellar to enjoy a social smoke while the ladies spent a pleasant hour visiting and chatting and incidentially refreshing themselves with orange, pine appleade served in the front hall.
About midnight the company took their departure and if the spirit of the evening is a criterion of what the future has in store for the bride and groom, they are assured of both happiness and prosperity.
The out of town guests were Mr. and Mrs. David KNEELAND, Mr. and Mrs. BEY of Lewiston, Miss Edith POTTER, of Milwaukee, Mrs. Lewis JENSON, of Gaylord, Miss Mary WOODRUFF of Roscommon, and Mr. MEILSTROP of Bay City. (14 Mar 1907)

-Mrs. W. E. SMITH left Tuesday for Marlette where her husband has embarked into the retail lumber business. They will make this their home. Mr. and Mrs. SMITH are the parents of Mrs. Oscar HANSON.

-R. HANSON and Oscar will sail from New York to Denmark, on the Crown Prince, June 3rd. (29 May 1927)

-Mrs. Henry BAUMAN left wednesday night for Salisbury, N.C., to spend Easter with her daughter and husband, Mr. and Mrs. Walter WOODSON (Grace BAUMAN). Enroute to North Carolina, Mrs. BAUMAN was joined at Detroit by her daughter, Mrs. Ralph ROUTIER who accompanied her. Mr. and Mrs. Oscar HANSON are visiting the young couple in Salisbury and will also be their guests over Easter. (17 Apr 1930)

-HANSON-WILCOX
(from Saginaw News)
Marked by its lovely simplicity was the marriage of Miss Ella Louise HANSON, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Oscar W. HANSON of Grayling, to Henry Berst WILCOX, son of Mrs. Harvey C. BEESON, 429 South Weadock avenue, Saginaw, which took place at noon Saturday in the Memorial room of the First Congregational church. Rev. Thornton B. PENFIELD, Jr., officiated in the presence of 33 guests before an altar of palms an dwhite snapdragons.
Miss HANSON chose for her marriage a stunning custume suit of toast colored wool. the finger-tip length jacket was fashioned with a butter-scotch colored fox collar. Brown accessories and a shoulder bouquet of lavender orchids completed her ensemble. Miss Margrethe HANSON, who was her twin sister's only attendant, wore a charming brown and white dress made redingote style and accented with brown accessories. Her flowers were gardenias. Harold L. DORMAN of Saginaw officiated as groomsman.
Shortly after the wedding breakfast, which was served at the Bancfroft, Mr. and Mrs. WILCOX left on a motor trip to North Carolina. On their return trip they will be at home at 802 Court street, Saginaw.
Out-of-town guests at the wedding were Mrs. helen ROUTIER, Ralph H. ROUTIER and Mrs. Walker MUNRO of Detroit, Mr. and Mrs. Esbern R. HANSON, Mrs. Henry A. BAUMAN and Wilhelm RAAE of Grayling, Mr. and Mrs. Esbern R. HANSON, Jr., of Alma, Mr. and Mrs. Ashton J. BERST of Pleasant Ridge and Mr. and Mrs. Ellsworth FORD and Miss Jane FORD of Flint.
The above write-up is of special interest to Grayling people who have known the bride from birth and have watch her grow to womanhood. Ella Louise HANSON and her twin sister Margrethe, were born Sept. 7, 1910, to Mr. and Mrs. Oscar HANSON. Following her graduation from high school she attended The Bennett School for Girls in New York and the University of Michigan, where she became a member of the Alpha Phi sorority.
Grayling folk rarely ever thought of Ella alone as she and her sister Margrethe were seldom apart. Ella's spontaneous nature and keen sense of humor made her popular with both young and old here, who join us in extending to her and the groom congratulations and best wishes.
The bride is the granddaughter of Mrs. Rasmus HANSON. (6 May 1937)


Bertha Howard SMITH

The following information extracted from the Grayling, Crawford Co., MI Newspaper Avalanche. NOTE: The date at the end of each extract indicates the date of the publication:
-Mrs. Oscar HANSON was called to Chatham, Canada on Tuesday, being advised that her brother's condition was considered very critical, with little hope of his recovery. She was accompanied by Mrs. R. HANSON. (5 May 1910)

-Mrs. W. E. SMITH left Tuesday for Marlette where her husband has embarked into the retail lumber business. They will make this their home. Mr. and Mrs. SMITH are the parents of Mrs. Oscar HANSON.

-Mrs. Oscar HANSON is entertaining her cousin, Mrs. Jas. A. RENNIE of Detroit with her two children. (9 Jul 1908)


Margrethe E. HANSON

The following information extracted from the Grayling, Crawford Co., MI Newspaper Avalanche. NOTE: The date at the end of each extract indicates the date of the publication:
-HANSON-WILCOX
(from Saginaw News)
Marked by its lovely simplicity was the marriage of Miss Ella Louise HANSON, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Oscar W. HANSON of Grayling, to Henry Berst WILCOX, son of Mrs. Harvey C. BEESON, 429 South Weadock avenue, Saginaw, which took place at noon Saturday in the Memorial room of the First Congregational church. Rev. Thornton B. PENFIELD, Jr., officiated in the presence of 33 guests before an altar of palms and white snapdragons.
Miss HANSON chose for her marriage a stunning custume suit of toast colored wool. The finger-tip length jacket was fashioned with a butter-scotch colored fox collar. Brown accessories and a shoulder bouquet of lavender orchids completed her ensemble. Miss Margrethe HANSON, who was her twin sister's only attendant, wore a charming brown and white dress made redingote style and accented with brown accessories. Her flowers were gardenias. Harold L. DORMAN of Saginaw officiated as groomsman.
Shortly after the wedding breakfast, which was served at the Bancfroft, Mr. and Mrs. WILCOX left on a motor trip to North Carolina. On their return trip they will be at home at 802 Court street, Saginaw.
Out-of-town guests at the wedding were Mrs. Helen ROUTIER, Ralph H. ROUTIER and Mrs. Walker MUNRO of Detroit, Mr. and Mrs. Esbern R. HANSON, Mrs. Henry A. BAUMAN and Wilhelm RAAE of Grayling, Mr. and Mrs. Esbern R. HANSON, Jr., of Alma, Mr. and Mrs. Ashton J. BERST of Pleasant Ridge and Mr. and Mrs. Ellsworth FORD and Miss Jane FORD of Flint.
The above write-up is of special interest to Grayling people who have known the bride from birth and have watch her grow to womanhood. Ella Louise HANSON and her twin sister Margrethe, were born Sept. 7, 1910, to Mr. and Mrs. Oscar HANSON. Following her graduation from high school she attended The Bennett School for Girls in New York and the University of Michigan, where she became a member of the Alpha Phi sorority.
Grayling folk rarely ever thought of Ella alone as she and her sister Margrethe were seldom apart. Ella's spontaneous nature and keen sense of humor made her popular with both young and old here, who join us in extending to her and the groom congratulations and best wishes.
The bride is the granddaughter of Mrs. Rasmus HANSON. (6 May 1937)


John C. HANSON

The following information extracted from the Grayling, Crawford Co., MI Newspaper Avalanche. NOTE: The date at the end of each extract indicates the date of the publication:
-James L. HANSON, who has been visiting his parents, Mr. and Mrs. J. C. HANSON, for the last three weeks, started for his Indiana home, last Tuesday. (11 Sep 1890)

-At a regular encampment of Marvin Post, No. 240, Grand Army of the Republic, held last Saturday evening, the 13th inst., the following officers were elected:
Commander, - W. S. CHALKER
Sen. Vice Com. - A. C. WILCOX
Jun. Vice Com. - R. McELROY
Quartermaster. - E. AUGUR
Chaplain. - W. WOODBURN
Surgeon. - O. PALMER
Officer of the Day. - O. J. BELL
Del. to Dept. Encamp't - L. St. JOHN
Alternate. - D. S. WALDRON (18 Dec 1890)

-Mrs. J. C. HANSON left on yesterday, for Logansport, Indiana, for a visit and to attend the wedding of J. L. HANSON, (the only), and Miss Blanche BENNETT, of that city. (7 June 1894).

-Republican Causus - Grayling Tp.
Caucus was called to order by the chairman of the township committee, C. T. JEROME, who stated the business for which the caucus was called.
On Motion M. A. BATES was elected chairman, and J. C. HANSON, Secretary.
On motion the chairman appointed three tellers, consisting of J. K. MERZ, A. L. POND and J. J. COLLEN.
O. PALMER, Notary Public, administered the oath of office to the officers of the caucus.
The following persons were then nominated for township officers:
Supervisor - Geo. W. COMER.
Clerk - W. G. MARSH.
Treasurer - John STALEY.
Highway Comm'r - F. R. DECKROW
J. P., full term - R. McELROY.
J. P., to fill vacancy - J. K. BATES.
Member Board of Review - J. K. MERZ.
School Inspector - Wm. WOODFIELD.
School Inspector to fill vacancy - Er BELL.
Constables - Thos. K. CHITAGO, H. POND, Levi CLEMENT, and R. WILCOX.
M. A. BATES, D. McCORMICK and J. J. COLLEN were elected members of the township committee for the ensuing year. (2 Apr 1896)

-J. C. HANSON, Local Editor of the AVALANCHE. (23 Apr 1896)

-Miss Lulu BARLOW, our niece, who has visited here on several occasions, was married at Pittsburg, Pa., the 12th inst. (25 Nov 1897)

-Two score of the members of the W. R. C. and G. A. R. invaded the pleasant home of J. C. HANSON, Monday evening, just as the family were preparing to retire, to call his attention to the fact that he had just passed the 62nd milestone of the journey of his life. The occasion will not be soon forgotten, for it was filled with pleasure. Light refreshments were served, and before leaving the party, by the voice of Rev. H. L. COPE presented Mr. HANSON with a handsome pipe, hoping that as he enjoyed its solace in the future he would remember the time and the donors. (10 Feb 1898)

-Master George C. HANSON, grandson of Mr. and Mrs. J. C. HANSON, has been adjudged to be one of the handsomest boys in the United States, and was awarded a prize of $100.00, which has been paid by the originators of the contest, the New York Journal; Chicago American and the San Francisco Examiner. (19 Dec 1901)

-R. HANSON was called to Johannesberg, Monday, on account of the death of his brother's wife, Mrs. John HANSON, who moved from here to a farm near that place several years ago. She leaves her husband, one boy four years old, and a pair of twin boys a week old, with many friends to mourn her death. The body will be brought here for burial from the Danish Lutheran Church, at two o'clock, this afternoon. (20 Feb 1902)

-One of the twin boys, orphaned by the death of Mrs. John HANSON, at Johannesburg, was buried here, Tuesday, and the other is critically ill. (20 Mar 1902)

-PROBATE NOTICE.
ORDER FOR PUBLICATION.
STATE OF MICHIGAN.
THE PROBATE COURT FOR THE COUNTY OF CRAWFORD.
At a session of said court held at the Probate Office in the village of Grayling, in said county, on the 20th day of March, A. D. 1905,
Present, Hon. Wellington BATTERSON,
Judge of Probate.
In the matter of the estate of John C. HANSON.
Jacob W. HANSON, having filed in said court his petition praying that the administration of said estate be granted to himself or to some other suitable person,
It is ordered that the 28th day of April, A. D. 1905, at ten o'clock in the forenoon, at said Probate Office be and is hereby appointed for hearing said petition.
It is further ordered that public notice thereof be given by publication of a copy of this order for three successive weeks previous to said day of hearing in the Crawford Avalanche, a newspaper published and circulating in said county.
WELLINGTON BATTERSON,
apr 6-4w Judge of Probate. (30 Mar 1905)

-Interesting Events in Graylin 23 Years Ago - Thurs. 19 Sep 1907
DIED - Sunday, Sept. 15, in this village, Mrs. Johanna HANSON, aged 86 years. Mrs. HANSON was born in West Kipping, Denmark, in 1821, and came to this country in September, 1880. She leaves two sons, John HANSON and Rasmus HANSON, and three daughters, Mrs. BAY, of Lewiston, Mrs. Anna JOHNSON and Mrs. Mary RASMUSSON, and a host of friends to mourn her loss. Funeral services were held yesterday at the Danish Lutheran Church of which the deceased was an ardent member. (18 Sep 1930)

-


Mrs. Hanson

The following information extracted from the Grayling, Crawford Co., MI Newspaper Avalanche. NOTE: The date at the end of each extract indicates the date of the publication:
-R. HANSON was called to Johannesberg, Monday, on account of the death of his brother's wife, Mrs. John HANSON, who moved from here to a farm near that place several years ago. She leaves her husband, one boy four years old, and a pair of twin boys a week old, with many friends to mourn her death. The body will be brought here for burial from the Danish Lutheran Church, at two o'clock, this afternoon. (20 Feb 1902)

-One of the twin boys, orphaned by the death of Mrs. John HANSON, at Johannesburg, was buried here, Tuesday, and the other is critically ill. (20 Mar 1902)


H. R. BAY

The following information extracted from the Grayling, Crawford Co., MI Newspaper Avalanche. NOTE: The date at the end of each extract indicates the date of the publication:
-Interesting Events in Graylin 23 Years Ago - Thurs. 19 Sep 1907
DIED - Sunday, Sept. 15, in this village, Mrs. Johanna HANSON, aged 86 years. Mrs. HANSON was born in West Kipping, Denmark, in 1821, and came to this country in September, 1880. She leaves two sons, John HANSON and Rasmus HANSON, and three daughters, Mrs. BAY, of Lewiston, Mrs. Anna JOHNSON and Mrs. Mary RASMUSSON, and a host of friends to mourn her loss. Funeral services were held yesterday at the Danish Lutheran Church of which the deceased was an ardent member. (18 Sep 1930)

-Mrs. Lars RASMUSSON Passed Away
Mrs. Lars RASMUSSON, one of the few remaining pioneers of Crawford County and Northern Michigan, passed away at her home at 2:30 o'clock Friday morning following a lingering illness of several years duration. Having lived in Grayling for over half a century mrs. RASMUSSON had witnessed the progress in the town's growth from almost its beginning and could relate many of the interesting happenings of the days of old.
Mary HANSON was born in Wester of Kippinge, Denmark April 19, 1853. Her brother, the late Rasmus HANSON having come to this section when it was inhabited by the Indians and the country a wilderness, wrote to his family of the opportunities in America and they in turn came here to make their home. It was on Sept. 1, 1882 that she and th eother members of her family arrived in America and directly came to Grayling. A couple of years after coming here were spent in Manistee where on Sept. 29, 1888 she was united in marriage to Lars RASSMUSSON. They returned to Grayling in 1890 where their son Harold was born. Mrs. RASMUSSON was a member of the Danish church and in her younger days took part in all its activities. She was held in high esteem by her hosts of friends and her example and influence will be a cherished memory to her family and friends in years to come.
The funeral was held Monday afternoon with services at the home at 2:00 o'clock followed by services at Danish-Lutheran church. Rev. Hans JUHL officiated and delivered a very impressive sermon. Pallbearers were old friends of the family, and interment was in Elmwood cemetery.
Mrs. H. R. BAY, who was called here owing to her sister's illness arrived Sunday and was in attendance at the last rites together with her son Edwin. they came from Corvallis, Montana. The husband and son Harold and 6 grandchildren and a cousin Peter HANSON of Grayling are the other survivors, and all have the sympathy of many in their sorrow. (15 Mar 1934)


HANSON

The following information extracted from the Grayling, Crawford Co., MI Newspaper Avalanche. NOTE: The date at the end of each extract indicates the date of the publication:
-Mr. and Mrs. Rasmus BAY, of Otsego Lake, had the misfortune to lose their child, about one year old by death, last Sunday. The body was brought to Grayling for interment. The funeral services were held at the residence of Mr. R. HANSON, brother of Mrs. Bay. (29 Aug 1889)

-Interesting Events in Graylin 23 Years Ago - Thurs. 19 Sep 1907
DIED - Sunday, Sept. 15, in this village, Mrs. Johanna HANSON, aged 86 years. Mrs. HANSON was born in West Kipping, Denmark, in 1821, and came to this country in September, 1880. She leaves two sons, John HANSON and Rasmus HANSON, and three daughters, Mrs. BAY, of Lewiston, Mrs. Anna JOHNSON and Mrs. Mary RASMUSSON, and a host of friends to mourn her loss. Funeral services were held yesterday at the Danish Lutheran Church of which the deceased was an ardent member. (18 Sep 1930)


Edwin BAY

The following information extracted from the Grayling, Crawford Co., MI Newspaper Avalanche. NOTE: The date at the end of each extract indicates the date of the publication:
-Mrs. Lars RASMUSSON Passed Away
Mrs. Lars RASMUSSON, one of the few remaining pioneers of Crawford County and Northern Michigan, passed away at her home at 2:30 o'clock Friday morning following a lingering illness of several years duration. Having lived in Grayling for over half a century mrs. RASMUSSON had witnessed the progress in the town's growth from almost its beginning and could relate many of the interesting happenings of the days of old.
Mary HANSON was born in Wester of Kippinge, Denmark April 19, 1853. Her brother, the late Rasmus HANSON having come to this section when it was inhabited by the Indians and the country a wilderness, wrote to his family of the opportunities in America and they in turn came here to make their home. It was on Sept. 1, 1882 that she and the other members of her family arrived in America and directly came to Grayling. A couple of years after coming here were spent in Manistee where on Sept. 29, 1888 she was united in marriage to Lars RASSMUSSON. They returned to Grayling in 1890 where their son Harold was born. Mrs. RASMUSSON was a member of the Danish church and in her younger days took part in all its activities. She was held in high esteem by her hosts of friends and her example and influence will be a cherished memory to her family and friends in years to come.
The funeral was held Monday afternoon with services at the home at 2:00 o'clock followed by services at Danish-Lutheran church. Rev. Hans JUHL officiated and delivered a very impressive sermon. Pallbearers were old friends of the family, and interment was in Elmwood cemetery.
Mrs. H. R. BAY, who was called here owing to her sister's illness arrived Sunday and was in attendance at the last rites together with her son Edwin. they came from Corvallis, Montana. The husband and son Harold and 6 grandchildren and a cousin Peter HANSON of Grayling are the other survivors, and all have the sympathy of many in their sorrow. (15 Mar 1934)


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