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Extractions From the "Avalanche" a Crawford Co., MI Newspaper 1879-1940's

Notes


R. P. FORBES

The following information extracted from the Grayling, Crawford Co., MI Newspaper Avalanche. NOTE: The date at the end of each extract indicates the date of the publication:
-A big day's work was done in the line of well digging on Monday on the farm of R. P. FORBES, by W. H. SHERMAN, who dug and curbed a 20 feet well 3 1/2 feet square, in nine hours. (28 May 1879)

-Mrs. STEWART, of Oakland county, visited a few days in the city last week guest of Mr. and Mrs. R. P. FORBES. Mrs. STEWART is a sister to Mr. FORBES. (21 Jun 1883)

-MARVIN POST G. A. R.
As per announcement in the AVALANCHE, the old soldiers of the county met at the court house last Friday for the formation of a Post of the Grand Army of the Republic. The name selected, as indicated above, was in honor of the only comrade who had dided in this county, to the knowledge of any who were present, Comrade Harry MARVIN, of Beaver Creek township, who was mustered into the grand army above.
As will be seen by the roster published below, there are over 40 charter members, and if the enthusiasm manifested by those present at the organization continues, the post will flourish. the date of muster is not decided, but will be some time this month, and then the veterans can gather around their camp fire and live over again the life of field, and march, and battle.
The following officers were elected:
Commander - O. J. BELL.
Senior Vice-Commander - O. PALMER.
Jun. Vice Com. - Thos. LOUND.
Quartermaster - J. G. MARSH.
Chaplain - O. G. ANDREWS.
Surgeon - Alex. ODELL.
Officer of the Day - A. E. NEWMAN.
Officer of the Guard - G. BOSOM.
Adjutant - J. J. COVENTRY.
Sergeant - Major - C. W. WIGHT.
Quar. - Sergt. - A. C. WILSON.
Sentry - C. A. INGERSON.
We give the complete roster of charter members, and hope during the season to add the name of every soldier in the county:
O. J. BELL, I, 6th Mich H. A.
Samuel CASSIMER, K, 30th Wis V I.
Oscar PALMER, C, 1st U S S S.
W. BATTERSON, I, 1st N Y Dragoons.
A. TAYLOR, B, 22d N Y Cav.
I. J. CURRAN.
S. M. MILES, B. 101st Pa Inf.
A. D. COLESTOCK, E, 7th Mich Cav.
J. J. COVENTRY, K, 11th N. J. Inf.
G. H. THAYER, E, 2d Mich Cav.
Aaron ATEN, A, 21st O V I.
F. M. FORBES, I, 145th P V I.
R. P. FORBES, I, 5th Mich Cav.
S. HEMPSTED, B, 4th Mich Cav.
A. C. WILSON, B, 17th N Y B.
E. WYCKOFF.
Wm. WOODBURN, D, 5th Mich Cav.
O. G. ANDREWS, E, 8th Mich Inf.
C. A. INGERSON, E, 50th N Y Eng.
C. W. WIGHT, B, 2d N H H A.
J. W. WALLACE, F, 1st Mich Inf.
H. DAVENPORT, D. 105th N Y V I.
D. WILLETT, M, 7th Mich Cav.
W. HAYNES, A, 122d N Y V I.
A. ODELL, K, 8th N Y H A.
A. J. ROSE, F. 126th N Y V I.
J. G. MARSH, E, 9th Mich Cav.
C. E. STRUNK, A, 4th Mich V I.
Thos LOUND, G, 3d Mich Cav.
G. BOSOM, I, 1th Mich Inf.
L. BOSOM, L, 1st Mich Eng.
Geo. FAUBLE, I, 85th? Ill V I.
A. H. ALLEN, D, 151st N Y V I.
M. PACKARD, F, 152d Ind V I.
N. BARNEY.
Wm. H. ROE, F, 16th Mich V I.
A. C. WILCOX, I, 5th Mich V I.
A. MOSHER, K, 3d Mich Cav.
L. StJOHN, I, 12th Mich V I.
Wm WILCOX, H, 2d Mich Cav.
W. HAVENS,
S. H. JOHNSON, E. 1st Mo Eng.
A. E. NEWMAN, F, 15th. (13 Mar 1884)

-Mr. and Mrs. FORBES wish to return many thanks to the friends and neighbors for their kindness and attention in their late berevement. (25 Dec 1884).

-R. P. FORBES returned from Flint Tuesday, accompanied by his brother J. C. FORBES, of that city. (1 Oct 1885)

-R. P. FORBES and family left for Fentonville, their new home, on last Friday morning. Mr. FORBES will devote his time to farming hereafter. ()27 May 1886)

-Sixty years of storm and sunshine have succeeded each other since R. P. FORBES entered this "Vale of Tears," and on Tuesday evening about sixty of his friends took possession of his home to help him celebrate the anniversary of his coming. It was one of those happy gatherings of friends that helps to make life worth living, and will be long remembered by those present. After the social hours, and bounteous refreshment, Rev. COPE presented Mr. FORBES with an elegant G. A. R. pin, a gift from his comrades here, acting with his speech a fine charade, which however was easily guessed. (11 Mar 1897)

-R. P. FORBES and family are made glad by a visit from his sisters, Mrs. STEWART, of Flint and Mrs. NORTHWAY, of Owosso. (28 Dec 1899)

-R. P. FORBES was agreeable surprised, Saturday, by a visit from his brother, from Lamar, Iowa, whom he had not met for 30 years. Their sister from Bay City came up with him. (23 Aug 1900)

-Last Monday, R. P. FORBES passed the 71st milestone of life, and in the evening forty-five of their friends dropped into their home and made all feel young again, leaving at a late hour with good wishes for continual health and happiness, after presenting him with a souvenir for remembrance of the time. (12 Mar 1908)

-R. P. FORBES and wife were called to Durand last week by the death of his sister Mrs. NORTHWAY, who spent most of the summer here. She had been an invalid for a long time, and her going, though a shock to family and friends was but a relief from suffering. (4 Feb 1909)


Rose E.

The following information extracted from the Grayling, Crawford Co., MI Newspaper Avalanche. NOTE: The date at the end of each extract indicates the date of the publication:
-DIED - At Grayling, Dec. 20th, 1884, Lottie FORBES, daughter of R. P. and Rose E. FORBES, aged one year, eleven months and nine days. (25 Dec 1884).

-Mr. and Mrs. FORBES wish to return many thanks to the friends and neighbors for their kindness and attention in their late berevement. (25 Dec 1884).

-Mrs. R. P. FORBES is enjoying a visit from her sister, Mrs. HATHAWAY, of Corrunna. (28 Aug 1890)

-Miss Minnie FORBES, who came from her home in Indiana four weeks ago, to help care for her Grandmother, Mrs. R. P. FORBES, returned last Friday. Mrs. FORBES is convalescing from her serious illness, and her friends confidently expect her restoration to normal health. (8 Mar 1906)


Lottie FORBES

The following information extracted from the Grayling, Crawford Co., MI Newspaper Avalanche. NOTE: The date at the end of each extract indicates the date of the publication:
-DIED - At Grayling, Dec. 20th, 1884, Lottie FORBES, daughter of R. P. and Rose E. FORBES, aged one year, eleven months and nine days. (25 Dec 1884).

-Mr. and Mrs. FORBES wish to return many thanks to the friends and neighbors for their kindness and attention in their late berevement. (25 Dec 1884).


FORBES

The following information extracted from the Grayling, Crawford Co., MI Newspaper Avalanche. NOTE: The date at the end of each extract indicates the date of the publication:
-R. P. FORBES and family are made glad by a visit from his sisters, Mrs. STEWART, of Flint and Mrs. NORTHWAY, of Owosso. (28 Dec 1899)


J. C. FORBES

The following information extracted from the Grayling, Crawford Co., MI Newspaper Avalanche. NOTE: The date at the end of each extract indicates the date of the publication:
-R. P. FORBES returned from Flint Tuesday, accompanied by his brother J. C. FORBES, of that city. (1 Oct 1885)


James C. GOODALE

The following information extracted from the Grayling, Crawford Co., MI Newspaper Avalanche. NOTE: The date at the end of each extract indicates the date of the publication:
-Mr. J. C. GOODALE informs us that he will run a planer and re-sawer in connection with his saw mill, and will soon be ready to accomodate all parties who may want any work done in that line. (28 May 1879)

-Fifty Village Lots
In The Village
of
GRAYLING
For Sale Cheap
Lots Will Only Be
Sold To Persons
Intending to Build
Thereon.
Inquire of or Address
Jas. C. GOODALE,
Grayling, Mich. (28 May 1879)

-On the evening of the 22d, a social "hop" was given at the Hall, in this village, in which about 30 couple participated. It was given by Mr. J. C. GOODALE, as a farewell benefit, prior to his anticipated removal to the great West. Good music was one of the features of the occasion, as was also the oyster supper at Mr. Fred SORENSON's. The oyster is not a handsome bird, and he fles by-valves. (24 Feb 1881)

-Mrs. J. C. GOODALE, accompanied by her childrenn, left for Owosso one day last week, to visit friends and relatives, previous to her expected departure for Oregon soon with her husband. (21 Apr 1881)

-Mr. J. C. GOODALE bid adieu to Grayling and departed for Chesaning, Monday last. (28 Apr 1881)

-A letter was received on Tuesday of this week by a gentleman in this village from J. C. GOODALE, who writes from Kansas City, who, it will be seen is on his way to Oregon, with his family. He states that they crossed the mad Missouri in safety, although it was 18 feet higher than common, but before they got across the family were all taken * *, from an over indulgence of river water. (28 Apr 1881)

-Mr. J. O. HADLEY is just in receipt of a letter from J. C. GOODALE post-marked SanFrancisco, but who is now probably in Portland, Oregon, with his family, as he intended to resume his journey on the following day. ( 19 May 1881)

-We acknowledge the receipt of a lengthy and somewhat interesting letter in the nature of a communication from Mr. J. C. GOODALE, from Portland Oregon, but we cannot give it space, much as we would like to. (2 Jun 1881)

-CORRESPONDENCE.
PORTLAND, OREGON, MAY, 16TH, 1881.
EDITOR AVALANCHE:-Agreeable to promise, I will now endeavor to send you a few items of interest in connection with my journey from Crawford county to this place. We arrived in Portland the 14th inst., all OK. We left earth the 26th of April, arrived at Chicago in due time and proceeded on our journey through to Omaha, where the high water obliged us to go to Quincy, thence to Kansas City, thence to Denver and Cheyenne, 516 miles west of Omaha. Here we found Bro. O. R. GOODALE and a brother to Jas. BALL, and Lant THAYER, known to Chesaning folks. We staid there two days. Cheyenne is a fine city in Wyoming Territory, containing some 5,000 souls. Two companies of soldiers are stationed here to keep the noble red man quiet. At this point we start up hill, and the train that carries us is propelled by two powerful engines, (as it does all trains of 20 coaches or less). We found sheep, cattle and horses scattered all over the Rockey Mountains; plenty of living streams even at the very top, 8,226 feet above the sea, and where it is as warm as Summer; but the air is rather light or thin. At Ogden the weather was as warm as I ever saw it at Grayling. Here we changed cars and took the Central Pacific R. R. The accommodations were better on this road. We were provided with sleeping coaches to San Francisco. We had previously been through some extensive snow-sheds, but on this road we found the grand father of all sheds, being 12 (or 42) miles in length and of sufficient width for trains to pass and repass. Here the snow is perpetual, never leaving even in the hottest season. After leaving this place we beheld some of the grandest scenery I ever saw in my short life. We commenced to descend through canyons, and around mountains of 7,200 feet in elevation. We rounded Cape Horn, where the track is cut around a mountain in the very sides; you look up 2,000 feet, almost straight, while on the other side you look, yes, you do look, (and you will hold your breath for just 30 - almost straight down, so straight you cannot see the mountain under you until your eyes reach the bottom. Just beyond this we cross the narrow-gauge R. R. 500 feet below, coming out of a canyon, or from some mines in the mountains - 'tis grand in the extreme, and so on down, down, down.
We finally reached Sacramento, a lively city of 30000 inhabitants. here we pass into the great California Valley where you see farms as far as the eye can reach, with about 200 wind mills for each farm, which are necessary for the purpose of irregation; it looks like a city of mills, and we only tire of looking at the varied and beautiful scenery along the route only when night shuts in our sleepy vision, and we go to bed to wake up in Oakland, across the bay from San Francisco, where we are ferried across to Frisco, and breakfast at the American Exchange. We came here on Monday and leave Wednesday at 10:00, on the Steamship Oregon, the finest vessel I ever saw. We got to sea and the vessel began to roll, and Mrs. G. rolled into bed, as also Jim and Charlie, and they staid there until we reached the Columbia river. Here is the grandest sight I ever witnessed on water; mountains on one side on which stands a fort, while to the southward the breakers dash for miles. A crooked narrow schannel is here encountered and it requires a pilot that knows his business to get through. We had a good one and did not ground, but were 67 hours in running the channel. On one side the channel are huge rocks, and on the other we witnessed the breaking up and total destruction of an immense steamer, and the drowning of 67 of her crew.
Now comes hundreds of boats catching salmon trout; the fishermen seem perfectly crazy, and not a day passes but some poor fellow is drowned. We soon reached Portland, and were surprised at the magnitude of this city. It contains ten banks, and other branches of business represented here are immense. Found some old friends here, but do not find Mr. PRATT, nor hear of him. I had a short visit with Judge WALDRON's wife's brother, Mr. BAILEY. He seems to be doing well; runs a 1st class grocery, and employs 3 clerks. Well, this as far as I have got. More anon. J. C. GOODALE.(9 Jun 1881)

-Through recent correspondence from J. C. GOODALE, we learn that he has purchased a section of choice pine land in Oregon, which is estimated to contain 25,000,000 of standing pine, and which he is soon to commence lumbering. (18 Aug 1881)

-A SOUND FROM AN OLD GRAYLINGITE.
FROM OREGON;
EDITOR AVALANCHE; - As many of my old friends and neighbors of Grayling and therebouts, have been looking for my return to visit them and as Christmas prevented me coming this fall, I thought I might write a few words in your valuable paper. With my family I left Grayling Apr. 26th, 1880. Bound for Oregon or bust. I am here but not busted. The Willamite valley is in my opinion, the finest country on earth; I have traveled in twenty-four of the states and am able to form an opinion. this valley is about 80 miles wide and 150 miles long, this is a State almost. When I say the finest country I wish it understood for agriculture, climate and health. We are sure of a good crop every year, no failure, only one year the spring wheat rusted, but no other. The climate is very even, the Thermometer stands 52 degrees and this is about as it has been so far this winter, I can look off on to Mt. Hood, 14675ft above the ocean and see snow any day in the year, also Mt. StHelens and Mt. Rayner. I can ride on my harvester and see these three Mts. at once any clear day. Hood is 90 miles, StHelens 100 miles, and Rayner 110 miles, yet you can see them plainly. I do not know of but one sick person any where, the poorest place for Doctors on earth. Lumbering here yet is just in its infancy. The demand is far greater then the supply, and must be for a long time. We shall next summer have three R. R's. running into the State and they must use an enormus amount of lumber. lumber is not graded here as it is there, common is worth $12, flooring $25, Rustic $25, we call all better than common here clear. We get mostly fir, some very nice pine and cedar. this is worth about double price from fir. There is a large amount of capital seeking investments here in Portand, a town of 30,000 inhabitants. there are 8 banks, they ship directly to the old country and do their importing. We have a better school system here then there, it suits me better. This State pays about 5 mills per head, this brings it about $8.00 per head the balance is paid by rate bill. there your school tax is full one half of your taxes, here it is a small rate bill, say for 3 months $2.00 per head is about the average. Of crops here, wheat and oats are the principle. Barley, wheet, peas, beans and potatoes do well. Of fruit this country beats any place I ever saw. All kinds of apple, peaches, pears, prunes, plums, cherries, quinces and small fruit without end and yet they all bring a paying price. Property here in the valley is advancing in price fast enough to be healthy, tradesman well, farmers better, plenty of gold to pay with. The rainy season is now upon us but we pay but little attention to it, it rains so easy, not hard, no wind to speak of in the winter, light winds in the summer, called, and is the sea breeze.
Lest I tire you out I will add my finale.
Respectfully yours, J. C. GOODALE. (28 Dec 1882)

-J. C. GOODALE, Esq., one of Grayling's pioneers, is here on a visit from his new home in Oregon. We wonder if he notes any changes? (31 Jan 1884)

-JAMES C. GOODALE DEAD
PROMINENT LUMBERMAN OF WILLIAMETTE
VALLEY FOR MANY YEARS.
SANTA MONICA, CAL., April 1.-(Special.)-James C. GOODALE, a retired lumberman dealer and sawmill man of Salem, Or., dropped dead at Sawtelle this afternoon. He was there on a visit with his wife. They had arranged to leave for their home in the north tomorrow night. Heart trouble was his ailment. Mr. GOODALE was 75 years old. The body will leave for Salem tomorrow night.

SALEM, Or., April 1-(Special)-J. C. GOODALE Sr. was for many years a resident of Salem and was well known as a lumberman in the Willamette Valley. He was born in New York 75 years ago. While a young man he went to Michigan and there engaged in lumbering, which occupation he resumed at Hubbard, Or., upon coming to this state in 1882. Later he removed to Coburg, Lane county, where he operated a sawmill for 20 years. During the last 15 years he has conducted a lumber yard in this city.
Mr. GOODALE was a veteran of the Civil War, having served in a Michigan regiment which participated in the battle of Shiloh and other engagements. He was a member of the Masonic fraternity and of the order of Oddfellows. He leaves a widow, three sons and one daughter. The latter are J. C. GOODALE Jr., and C. C. GOODALE, Salem; W. D. GOODALE, Ballard, Wash., and Mrs. Ida STEVENS, Eugene.
Funeral arrangements have not been made.
The above notice was received by R. HANSON in a letter from Mr. GOODALE's son. The deceased will be remembered by our older pioneers, as he was the first lumber manufacturer here, and sold his mill and interests to Salling, Hanson & Co. in 1880. A number of our citizens came here with him from Chesaning, of whom Chas. P. ROBINSON and family alone remain. (23 Apr 1908)


Ida

The following information extracted from the Grayling, Crawford Co., MI Newspaper Avalanche. NOTE: The date at the end of each extract indicates the date of the publication:
-Mrs. Ida GOODALE, wife of J. C. GOODALE, died at her home at the corner of 12th and Oak streets last night at 8:15 o'clock. Mrs. GOODALE has been in failing health for the past two months and an attack of typhoid-malaria about a week ago, was more than her weakened constitution could bear. The deceased lady was about 50 years old and, besides her husband, J. C. GOODALE, the Salem and Coburg lumber dealer, she leaves three sons and one daughter to mourn her demise. The sons are Charles GOODALE, of Pendleton; Wm. GOODALE, of Tacoma, and James GOODALE, of this city. The daughter is Mrs. Ida STEVENS, of Eugene, who has been here for the week at the bedside of her mother. Mrs. GOODALE moved to Salem about 2 years ago, from Eugene, where the family had resided for many years. She was a member of the Presbyterian church of this city, and a consistent Christian. Her neighbors and friends hold her in highest esteem for the many kind acts and generous deeds which she has shown during her life. No arrangements have as yet been made for the funeral and it is not known whether the interment will take place here or at the old home in Eugene. [The above notice was clipped from an Oregon paper.] Mrs. GOODALE will be remembered by our old settlers as the wife of the pioneer lumberman of Grayling. (21 Feb 1901)


Charles C. GOODALE

The following information extracted from the Grayling, Crawford Co., MI Newspaper Avalanche. NOTE: The date at the end of each extract indicates the date of the publication:
-Mrs. Ida GOODALE, wife of J. C. GOODALE, died at her home at the corner of 12th and Oak streets last night at 8:15 o'clock. Mrs. GOODALE has been in failing health for the past two months and an attack of typhoid-malaria about a week ago, was more than her weakened constitution could bear. The deceased lady was about 50 years old and, besides her husband, J. C. GOODALE, the Salem and Coburg lumber dealer, she leaves three sons and one daughter to mourn her demise. The sons are Charles GOODALE, of Pendleton; Wm. GOODALE, of Tacoma, and James GOODALE, of this city. The daughter is Mrs. Ida STEVENS, of Eugene, who has been here for the week at the bedside of her mother. Mrs. GOODALE moved to Salem about 2 years ago, from Eugene, where the family had resided for many years. She was a member of the Presbyterian church of this city, and a consistent Christian. Her neighbors and friends hold her in highest esteem for the many kind acts and generous deeds which she has shown during her life. No arrangements have as yet been made for the funeral and it is not known whether the interment will take place here or at the old home in Eugene. [The above notice was clipped from an Oregon paper.] Mrs. GOODALE will be remembered by our old settlers as the wife of the pioneer lumberman of Grayling. (21 Feb 1901)

-JAMES C. GOODALE DEAD
PROMINENT LUMBERMAN OF WILLIAMETTE
VALLEY FOR MANY YEARS.
SANTA MONICA, CAL., April 1.-(Special.)-James C. GOODALE, a retired lumberman dealer and sawmill man of Salem, Or., dropped dead at Sawtelle this afternoon. He was there on a visit with his wife. They had arranged to leave for their home in the north tomorrow night. Heart trouble was his ailment. Mr. GOODALE was 75 years old. The body will leave for Salem tomorrow night.

SALEM, Or., April 1-(Special)-J. C. GOODALE Sr. was for many years a resident of Salem and was well known as a lumberman in the Willamette Valley. He was born in New York 75 years ago. While a young man he went to Michigan and there engaged in lumbering, which occupation he resumed at Hubbard, Or., upon coming to this state in 1882. Later he removed to Coburg, Lane county, where he operated a sawmill for 20 years. During the last 15 years he has conducted a lumber yard in this city.
Mr. GOODALE was a veteran of the Civil War, having served in a Michigan regiment which participated in the battle of Shiloh and other engagements. He was a member of the Masonic fraternity and of the order of Oddfellows. He leaves a widow, three sons and one daughter. The latter are J. C. GOODALE Jr., and C. C. GOODALE, Salem; W. D. GOODALE, Ballard, Wash., and Mrs. Ida STEVENS, Eugene.
Funeral arrangements have not been made.
The above notice was received by R. HANSON in a letter from Mr. GOODALE's son. The deceased will be remembered by our older pioneers, as he was the first lumber manufacturer here, and sold his mill and interests to Salling, Hanson & Co. in 1880. A number of our citizens came here with him from Chesaning, of whom Chas. P. ROBINSON and family alone remain. (23 Apr 1908)


Wm. D. GOODALE

The following information extracted from the Grayling, Crawford Co., MI Newspaper Avalanche. NOTE: The date at the end of each extract indicates the date of the publication:
-Mrs. Ida GOODALE, wife of J. C. GOODALE, died at her home at the corner of 12th and Oak streets last night at 8:15 o'clock. Mrs. GOODALE has been in failing health for the past two months and an attack of typhoid-malaria about a week ago, was more than her weakened constitution could bear. The deceased lady was about 50 years old and, besides her husband, J. C. GOODALE, the Salem and Coburg lumber dealer, she leaves three sons and one daughter to mourn her demise. The sons are Charles GOODALE, of Pendleton; Wm. GOODALE, of Tacoma, and James GOODALE, of this city. The daughter is Mrs. Ida STEVENS, of Eugene, who has been here for the week at the bedside of her mother. Mrs. GOODALE moved to Salem about 2 years ago, from Eugene, where the family had resided for many years. She was a member of the Presbyterian church of this city, and a consistent Christian. Her neighbors and friends hold her in highest esteem for the many kind acts and generous deeds which she has shown during her life. No arrangements have as yet been made for the funeral and it is not known whether the interment will take place here or at the old home in Eugene. [The above notice was clipped from an Oregon paper.] Mrs. GOODALE will be remembered by our old settlers as the wife of the pioneer lumberman of Grayling. (21 Feb 1901)

-JAMES C. GOODALE DEAD
PROMINENT LUMBERMAN OF WILLIAMETTE
VALLEY FOR MANY YEARS.
SANTA MONICA, CAL., April 1.-(Special.)-James C. GOODALE, a retired lumberman dealer and sawmill man of Salem, Or., dropped dead at Sawtelle this afternoon. He was there on a visit with his wife. They had arranged to leave for their home in the north tomorrow night. Heart trouble was his ailment. Mr. GOODALE was 75 years old. The body will leave for Salem tomorrow night.

SALEM, Or., April 1-(Special)-J. C. GOODALE Sr. was for many years a resident of Salem and was well known as a lumberman in the Willamette Valley. He was born in New York 75 years ago. While a young man he went to Michigan and there engaged in lumbering, which occupation he resumed at Hubbard, Or., upon coming to this state in 1882. Later he removed to Coburg, Lane county, where he operated a sawmill for 20 years. During the last 15 years he has conducted a lumber yard in this city.
Mr. GOODALE was a veteran of the Civil War, having served in a Michigan regiment which participated in the battle of Shiloh and other engagements. He was a member of the Masonic fraternity and of the order of Oddfellows. He leaves a widow, three sons and one daughter. The latter are J. C. GOODALE Jr., and C. C. GOODALE, Salem; W. D. GOODALE, Ballard, Wash., and Mrs. Ida STEVENS, Eugene.
Funeral arrangements have not been made.
The above notice was received by R. HANSON in a letter from Mr. GOODALE's son. The deceased will be remembered by our older pioneers, as he was the first lumber manufacturer here, and sold his mill and interests to Salling, Hanson & Co. in 1880. A number of our citizens came here with him from Chesaning, of whom Chas. P. ROBINSON and family alone remain. (23 Apr 1908)


James C. GOODALE Jr.

The following information extracted from the Grayling, Crawford Co., MI Newspaper Avalanche. NOTE: The date at the end of each extract indicates the date of the publication:
-Mrs. Ida GOODALE, wife of J. C. GOODALE, died at her home at the corner of 12th and Oak streets last night at 8:15 o'clock. Mrs. GOODALE has been in failing health for the past two months and an attack of typhoid-malaria about a week ago, was more than her weakened constitution could bear. The deceased lady was about 50 years old and, besides her husband, J. C. GOODALE, the Salem and Coburg lumber dealer, she leaves three sons and one daughter to mourn her demise. The sons are Charles GOODALE, of Pendleton; Wm. GOODALE, of Tacoma, and James GOODALE, of this city. The daughter is Mrs. Ida STEVENS, of Eugene, who has been here for the week at the bedside of her mother. Mrs. GOODALE moved to Salem about 2 years ago, from Eugene, where the family had resided for many years. She was a member of the Presbyterian church of this city, and a consistent Christian. Her neighbors and friends hold her in highest esteem for the many kind acts and generous deeds which she has shown during her life. No arrangements have as yet been made for the funeral and it is not known whether the interment will take place here or at the old home in Eugene. [The above notice was clipped from an Oregon paper.] Mrs. GOODALE will be remembered by our old settlers as the wife of the pioneer lumberman of Grayling. (21 Feb 1901)

-JAMES C. GOODALE DEAD
PROMINENT LUMBERMAN OF WILLIAMETTE
VALLEY FOR MANY YEARS.
SANTA MONICA, CAL., April 1.-(Special.)-James C. GOODALE, a retired lumberman dealer and sawmill man of Salem, Or., dropped dead at Sawtelle this afternoon. He was there on a visit with his wife. They had arranged to leave for their home in the north tomorrow night. Heart trouble was his ailment. Mr. GOODALE was 75 years old. The body will leave for Salem tomorrow night.

SALEM, Or., April 1-(Special)-J. C. GOODALE Sr. was for many years a resident of Salem and was well known as a lumberman in the Willamette Valley. He was born in New York 75 years ago. While a young man he went to Michigan and there engaged in lumbering, which occupation he resumed at Hubbard, Or., upon coming to this state in 1882. Later he removed to Coburg, Lane county, where he operated a sawmill for 20 years. During the last 15 years he has conducted a lumber yard in this city.
Mr. GOODALE was a veteran of the Civil War, having served in a Michigan regiment which participated in the battle of Shiloh and other engagements. He was a member of the Masonic fraternity and of the order of Oddfellows. He leaves a widow, three sons and one daughter. The latter are J. C. GOODALE Jr., and C. C. GOODALE, Salem; W. D. GOODALE, Ballard, Wash., and Mrs. Ida STEVENS, Eugene.
Funeral arrangements have not been made.
The above notice was received by R. HANSON in a letter from Mr. GOODALE's son. The deceased will be remembered by our older pioneers, as he was the first lumber manufacturer here, and sold his mill and interests to Salling, Hanson & Co. in 1880. A number of our citizens came here with him from Chesaning, of whom Chas. P. ROBINSON and family alone remain. (23 Apr 1908)


Solomon C. GOODALE

The following information extracted from the Grayling, Crawford Co., MI Newspaper Avalanche. NOTE: The date at the end of each extract indicates the date of the publication:
-DIED.
In Chesaning, Wednesday, May 3d, Solomon C. GOODALE, aged 53 years.
The deceased was a brother of J. C. GOODALE, formerly a resident of this city. (18 May 1882)


Burt J. LEWIS

The following information extracted from the Grayling, Crawford Co., MI Newspaper Avalanche. NOTE: The date at the end of each extract indicates the date of the publication:
-MARRIED-In Ionia, by Rev. Levi MASTER, Aug. 21, '87, Burt J. LEWIS, of Grayling and Miss Artiemissia A. H. LATTER, of Ionia, Mich. (25 Aug 1887)

-DIED.
At Ionia, Mich., Friday October 19th, Burt J. LEWIS, aged 20 years, of Consumption.
Deceased was a son of J. A. LEWIS of this place, and was well known by our people, having resided here for five years previous to his removal to Ionia last Spring. His mother and brother were buried within the past year. (25 Oct 1888)


Artiemissia "Artie" A. H. LATTER

The following information extracted from the Grayling, Crawford Co., MI Newspaper Avalanche. NOTE: The date at the end of each extract indicates the date of the publication:
-The 15th birthday of Miss Artie LATTER was celebrated at the residence of her father, Mr. John LATTER, in this township, on last Saturday. There were about twenty of their neighbors present, and had a pleasant time which was wound up by the erection of an addition to the residence of Mr. LATTER. (7 Aug 1884)

-MARRIED-In Ionia, by Rev. Levi MASTER, Aug. 21, '87, Burt J. LEWIS, of Grayling and Miss Artiemissia A. H. LATTER, of Ionia, Mich. (25 Aug 1887)


John A. LEWIS

The following information extracted from the Grayling, Crawford Co., MI Newspaper Avalanche. NOTE: The date at the end of each extract indicates the date of the publication:
-BORN-On the 4th inst, to Mr. and Mrs. J. A. LEWIS, of Grayling township, a son. (13 May 1886)

-MARRIED-On Saturday evening, Sept. 22, by Rev, J. W. TAYLOR, Mr. John A. LEWIS and Mrs. Mary BEARY. All of Grayling. (27 Sep 1888)

-DIED.
At Ionia, Mich., Friday October 19th, Burt J. LEWIS, aged 20 years, of Consumption.
Deceased was a son of J. A. LEWIS of this place, and was well known by our people, having resided here for five years previous to his removal to Ionia last Spring. His mother and brother were buried within the past year. (25 Oct 1888)

-CARD OF THANKS.
I wish, with my children to convey our thanks through the columns of the AVALANCHE, to our many friends who so kindly through the sickness of our loved parent, and who assisted us in burying her. Hoping that they may long be spared the affliction and that all along the journey of life they may have many friends to lean upon.
J. A. LEWIS,
and family (18 Feb 1892)

-BORN-On the 2d inst., to Mr. and Mrs. J. A. LEWIS, a son, weight fourteen pounds. (10 Oct 1895)


Ervin L. LEWIS

The following information extracted from the Grayling, Crawford Co., MI Newspaper Avalanche. NOTE: The date at the end of each extract indicates the date of the publication:
-OBITUARY.
Died at the residence of his father, in this village, Oct. 26, Ervin L. LEWIS, aged 18 years.
Deceased met with an accident in the mill, Oct. 8, by which he lost two fingers from his left hand. The wounds seemed to be healing kindly, but an attack of Pleurisy, followed by accute Pneumonia, proved fatal after ten days illness. (3 Nov 1887)


Mrs. O. P. SMITH LEWIS

The following information extracted from the Grayling, Crawford Co., MI Newspaper Avalanche. NOTE: The date at the end of each extract indicates the date of the publication:
-Mrs. O. P. SMITH, of Standish, formerly of Grayling, is making her father, J. A. LEWIS, and sister, Mrs. A. J. BENNETT, a visit. She says, Grayling seems most like home, after all. (3 Sep 1896)


S. BRITT

The following information extracted from the Grayling, Crawford Co., MI Newspaper Avalanche. NOTE: The date at the end of each extract indicates the date of the publication:
-Mr. S. BRITT, of Orleans county, N. Y., agreeable surprised his son, N. E. BRITT, Esq., one day last week by putting in an unannounced appearance. (31 Aug 1882)

-County surveyor N. E. BRITT has the pleasure of entertaining his parents at his pleasant home this summer. They are from Orleans county, N. Y., and were accompanied here by a son, who returned yesterday. ( 2 Aug 1883)


N. E. BRITT

The following information extracted from the Grayling, Crawford Co., MI Newspaper Avalanche. NOTE: The date at the end of each extract indicates the date of the publication:
-Mr. N. E. BRITT, of Medina, N. Y. has located in our village. Mr. BRITT comes to us well recommended as a practical surveyor. We understand he contemplates erecting a dwelling house soon. (20 Aug 1879)

-Mr. BROOKS, a brother-in-law to our Surveyor, N. E. BRITT, is making a short sojourn in our village. ( 13 Oct 1881)

-County surveyor N. E. BRITT has the pleasure of entertaining his parents at his pleasant home this summer. They are from Orleans county, N. Y., and were accompanied here by a son, who returned yesterday. ( 2 Aug 1883)

-We regret to announce that Mr. N. E. BRITT has sold his property here and will remove to the far west next month. Portland, Oregon, will be his first stopping place, though he anticipates making his home at some point in Washington Territory. Mr. BRITT and his family will be greatly missed by our people and may well know that they leave here a host of friends who will unite in wishing them happiness and prosperity wherever their lot may be cast. (9 Aug 1883)

-FROM OREGON.
We are permitted to give our readers the following extract from a letter written by N. E. BRITT to J. M. JONES, dated Riddles, Oregon, Dec. 16, 1883:
"When Mrs. B. wrote we had not then settled, but expected at that time to take our chances some where in Jackson county, but after looking around pretty thoroughly thought we would prospect this locality before purchasing, and accordingly did so, which resulted in our locating here. Found two farms here for sale, one of 170 acres at $17 per acre and another of 75 acres at $12. My brother bought the one of 170 acres and I bargained for the other, but found the title defective, so I rented it for one year, at the expiration of which time the place will have been held in peaceable possession under the present title for 20 years, which gives a perfect title. I have a contract for a deed for this place at the expiration of the lease.
Now, in regard to the country. So far we are all very much pleased. We are about 200 miles south of Portland, in what is known as the Umpqua Valley; we are also on the line of the O. & C. R. R., about one miile from and in sight of a station called Riddles, which was laid out last winter and now consists of about a half-dozen houses, with store, post office, etc. We are also about 30 miles south of Roseburg, the county seat of this Douglass county. So far this season I have not seen a bit of ice and but little rain and mud; have not had a mitten on my hand this season. Weather so far since we have been here is very much like Indian summer in Michigan, except that we have damp, foggy weather in the morning until near noon, when the sun comes out clear and bright. Vegetation here is still green, and summer birds are still here. We are close to neighbors and only about three-fourths of a mile from a school house. Old settlers here (none of them have lived here 30 years) tell me they have never known a failure of crops or fruit here. They were alarmed the fore part of this season on account of the cold weather last winter and the absence of rain this summer, but all crops were good. My neighbor told me yesterday he had 40 acres of wheat which yielded between 42 and 43 bushels per acre. All kinds of grain, including corn, grow finely; also all kinds of fruits, including grapes and peaches. There are lots of apples still in the orchards uninjured by freezing; have eaten lots of apples since coming here and have not seen a wormy one yet. The best fruit regions of Michigan cannot compare with this locality for fruit; neither can Michigan grow as nice vegetables; saw a cabbage grown in this valley which weighed 40 pounds. One of my neighbors has just set out 1,000 prune trees. Many have been put out in what is known as the Missouri Bottoms, another portion of this valley, which do splendidly and are said to surpass the California prunes. I will not weary your patience longer by telling you of all the good things that grow in abundance here, but will say I think we are in the best portion of Oregon.
Have not been hunting since I came here. My brother went out one day and killed a deer. They are very plentiful in the mountains. (17 Jan 1884)

-N. E. BRITT, who is favorably remembered by our early pioneers, as county surveyor, an ex-soldier, a sterling republican, a jolly good fellow and an all around man, came in on Monday's train, looking as hearty as when he left here in '83 for the far west. He is surprised at our growth, and pleased with our prosperity. If he had brought his family, and come to stay, we would have been better satisfied. (21 Jan 1892)


John LEECE

The following information extracted from the 1880 Census of Grove, Crawford, MI:
name - John LEECE
a.45
b.England
occupation - Farmer
married to Mary
f.b.England
m.b.England

The following information extracted from the Grayling, Crawford Co., MI Newspaper Avalanche. NOTE: The date at the end of each extract indicates the date of the publication:
-On Tuesday, August 12th, a very young lady came to the residence of John LEECE, of Center Plains, and proposed to make her home with the family. John and Mary are supremely happy, as all former descendants are plowholders and wood choppers.
Neighbor LEECE, may you live to a good old age, and in your declining years be comforted by an ever grateful daughter. (20 Aug 1879)

-Mrs. J. LEECE presented her husband with another voter last Monday evening. (13 Oct 1892)

-Saturday, March 11th, the home of Mr. and Mrs. John LEECE was entered by the "Angel of Death," who bore from them their infant son. (16 Mar 1893)

-Mr. and Mrs. John LEECE were called to Jackson County, last week, by the death of his brother Thomas LEECE, of Munith, who came from his birthplace in England in 1854, and has lived in the township of Henrietta for 43 years, an honored and respected citizen. Mrs. LEECE will remain for some time, visiting old friends. John returned Saturday to look after matters in the home here. (30 Jan 1902)

-Mr. Burton ASCHENFELTER and Miss Angie LEECE were united in marriage Wednesday evening, June 24th., at 8 o'clock, at the home of the bride's parents, Mr. and Mrs. John LEECE. Only a few of the immediate friends were present. The ceremony was performed by Rev. E. W. FRAZEE, of Gaylord, formerly pastor of the M. E. Church of this city. Mrs. FRAZEE was the only guest from out of town. The bride was attired in white faille. Miss HADLEY acted as bridesmaid, and Mr. Harry LEECE as best man. Miss Winifred BAKER played the wedding march. The house was prettily decorated with pansies, daisies and ferns. Following the ceremony, a two-course wedding supper was served. The young couple left on the morning train for the Soo, where they spend a week or two, and on their return will be at home to their friends at their residence on East Penninsular Ave. Both of the contracting parties are among the best known and highly esteemed young people in Grayling and their many friends extend congratulations. (2 Jul 1908)


Mary

The following information extracted from the 1880 Census of Grove, Crawford, MI:
name - Mary LEECE
a.28
b.MI
married to John LEECE
f.b.CT
m.b.CT

The following information extracted from the Grayling, Crawford Co., MI Newspaper Avalanche. NOTE: The date at the end of each extract indicates the date of the publication:
-On Tuesday, August 12th, a very young lady came to the residence of John LEECE, of Center Plains, and proposed to make her home with the family. John and Mary are supremely happy, as all former descendants are plowholders and wood choppers.
Neighbor LEECE, may you live to a good old age, and in your declining years be comforted by an ever grateful daughter. (20 Aug 1879)

-GROVE.
CORRESPONDENCE OF THE AVALANCHE.
Mrs. GONNIER, of Monroe, Mich., is visiting her sister, Mrs. John LEECE. ( 9 Mar 1882)

-Mr. and Mrs. GANFIELD, of Jackson, have been visiting her sister Mrs. John LEECE, of Grove. (10 Feb 1887)


Albert LEECE

The following information extracted from the Grayling, Crawford Co., MI Newspaper Avalanche. NOTE: The date at the end of each extract indicates the date of the publication:
-DIED-In Grove township, Feb. 1st, Albert, son of John and Mary LEECE, aged five years and five months. (10 Feb 1887)


Harry LEECE

The following information extracted from the Grayling, Crawford Co., MI Newspaper Avalanche. NOTE: The date at the end of each extract indicates the date of the publication:
-Miss Angie LEECE went to Detroit yesterday, taking her brother Harry to consult an occulist. (2 Oct 1902)


LEECE

The following information extracted from the Grayling, Crawford Co., MI Newspaper Avalanche. NOTE: The date at the end of each extract indicates the date of the publication:
-Mr. and Mrs. John LEECE were called to Jackson County, last week, by the death of his brother Thomas LEECE, of Munith, who came from his birthplace in England in 1854, and has lived in the township of Henrietta for 43 years, an honored and respected citizen. Mrs. LEECE will remain for some time, visiting old friends. John returned Saturday to look after matters in the home here. (30 Jan 1902)


Thomas LEECE

The following information extracted from the Grayling, Crawford Co., MI Newspaper Avalanche. NOTE: The date at the end of each extract indicates the date of the publication:
-Mr. and Mrs. John LEECE were called to Jackson County, last week, by the death of his brother Thomas LEECE, of Munith, who came from his birthplace in England in 1854, and has lived in the township of Henrietta for 43 years, an honored and respected citizen. Mrs. LEECE will remain for some time, visiting old friends. John returned Saturday to look after matters in the home here. (30 Jan 1902)


A. C. MERRILL

The following information extracted from the Grayling, Crawford Co., MI Newspaper Avalanche. NOTE: The date at the end of each extract indicates the date of the publication:
-A CARD,
To those who so kindly extended favors to us during the illness and after the death of our little Austin, and to Dr. N. H. TRAVER, for so kindly acting in the capacity he did, also to those who so kindly assisted at the grave, we return our most heartfelt thanks.
We are your most grateful Servants,
A. C. MERRILL,
Emma MERRILL (20 Aug 1879)


Emma

The following information extracted from the Grayling, Crawford Co., MI Newspaper Avalanche. NOTE: The date at the end of each extract indicates the date of the publication:
-A CARD,
To those who so kindly extended favors to us during the illness and after the death of our little Austin, and to Dr. N. H. TRAVER, for so kindly acting in the capacity he did, also to those who so kindly assisted at the grave, we return our most heartfelt thanks.
We are your most grateful Servants,
A. C. MERRILL,
Emma MERRILL (20 Aug 1879)


Austin MERRILL

The following information extracted from the Grayling, Crawford Co., MI Newspaper Avalanche. NOTE: The date at the end of each extract indicates the date of the publication:
-A CARD,
To those who so kindly extended favors to us during the illness and after the death of our little Austin, and to Dr. N. H. TRAVER, for so kindly acting in the capacity he did, also to those who so kindly assisted at the grave, we return our most heartfelt thanks.
We are your most grateful Servants,
A. C. MERRILL,
Emma MERRILL (20 Aug 1879)

-A FADED FLOWER.
On Friday last we were called out on the sad occasion of paying the last tribute to Austin C., infant son of A. C. and Emma MERRILL of this place, aged one year, eight months and twelve days. The little one had been very low for some three weeks when it pleased Him, who does all things well to end its sufferings and call him to a brighter world than this. Dr. N. H. TRAVER presided over the services at the school house and at the grave in a very touching manner. The afflicted parents of the little boy who has gone to a happy home beyond the grave, have the heartfelt sympathy of our entire community, in this, their deepest sorrow. The brightest hopes of loving parents are wiped away by the death of this dear one. No more will its sweet voice make happy the parents' hearts. No more will its tiny white hand pat its fathers face and pull its mothers curls, for his hands are at rest, leaving the heartbroken parents with the hope of meeting him in the sweet by and by, where friends will never part and sorrow and pain is not known.
He has called him away from this world of ours...the rest is not legible.


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