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The Avalanche The Ward Family Web Pages

Extractions From the "Avalanche" a Crawford Co., MI Newspaper 1879-1940's

Notes


Joseph LANGSTON

The following information extracted from the Grayling, Crawford Co., MI Newspaper Avalanche. NOTE: The date at the end of each extract indicates the date of the publication:
-The death of Mr. Joseph LANGSTON, an engineer in the employ of the Michigan Central, and well known to many of our readers is reported. (5 Jan 1888)


Daniel F. POND

The following information extracted from the Grayling, Crawford Co., MI Newspaper Avalanche. NOTE: The date at the end of each extract indicates the date of the publication:
-Daniel F. POND, a Michigan Central brakeman living at West Bay City, had his skull crushed between the ends of two logs while coupling cars last Wednesday near Pinconning, dying almost instantly. (12 Jan 1888)


George BURK

The following information extracted from the Grayling, Crawford Co., MI Newspaper Avalanche. NOTE: The date at the end of each extract indicates the date of the publication:
-Last Thursday George BURK, a Finlander in the employment of R. J. BRISCO, at Otsego Lake, dropped dead while ascending the stairway of the Hooker House, where he boarded. The deceased was known in that vicinity as a hardworking and honest man. - Otsego Co. News. (12 Jan 1888)


John REARDON

The following information extracted from the Grayling, Crawford Co., MI Newspaper Avalanche. NOTE: The date at the end of each extract indicates the date of the publication:
-The accident on the Gratwick, Smith & Fryer Lumber Co's., logging road east of Otsego Lake Tuesday was a bad one. John REARDON and Charles HARRIS were killed and five more men were more or less hurt. The men were in a car attached to the engine, which struck a broken rail throwing them off the track. The remains of REARDON wer sent to his home in West Bay City. - Otsego Co. Herald. (2 Feb 1888)


Charles HARRIS

The following information extracted from the Grayling, Crawford Co., MI Newspaper Avalanche. NOTE: The date at the end of each extract indicates the date of the publication:
-The accident on the Gratwick, Smith & Fryer Lumber Co's., logging road east of Otsego Lake Tuesday was a bad one. John REARDON and Charles HARRIS were killed and five more men were more or less hurt. The men were in a car attached to the engine, which struck a broken rail throwing them off the track. The remains of REARDON wer sent to his home in West Bay City. - Otsego Co. Herald. (2 Feb 1888)


Michael ENGLEMAN

The following information extracted from the Grayling, Crawford Co., MI Newspaper Avalanche. NOTE: The date at the end of each extract indicates the date of the publication:
-Michael ENGLEMAN, of Manistee, former partner of Messrs. SALLING, HANSON & C)., died in that city last Sunday night of pneumonia, after a three days' illness. He was one of the best citizens of the place, and his death is universally mourned. He left a large fortune acquired by his own individual efforts, and was buried under the auspices of the Knights Templar. (2 Feb 1888)


John RASMUSSON

The following information extracted from the Grayling, Crawford Co., MI Newspaper Avalanche. NOTE: The date at the end of each extract indicates the date of the publication:
-Mr. John LONDON has disposed of his livery stable to Mr. John RASMUSSON and some other party who will conduct the buiness in partnership. (9 Feb 1888)

-A young child of John RASMUSSON, was buried yesterday. Its death was caused by a combined attack of Diptheria and Mumps. (28 Mar 1889)

-The youngest child of Mr. and Mrs. John RASMUSSON, died this morning. (11 Apr 1889)

-John RASMUSSON was arrested Saturday on the charge of assault and battery, on the person of Nils LARSON. A jury trial, on Tuesday, resulted in his acquittal. (19 Jul 1894)

-John RASMUSSON was arrested on the charge of assault and battery on Adolph DELAIRE, last Friday, arraigned before Justice WOODBURN, plead guilty and paid ten dollars and cost. (19 Jul 1894)

-BORN-On the 19th, inst., to Mr. and Mrs. John RASMUSSON, a son. (25 Jun 1896)

-CIRCUIT COURT.
John RASMUSSON, for violation of the liquor law (keeping saloon open after nine o'clock) plead guilty and paid a fine of $25.00 and $10.00 cost. Mr. RASMUSSON stated that the saloon keepers were given permission to keep open till ten o'clock at night by the Prosecuting Attorney at the time of his election in 1898, which was promptly denied by Mr. PATTERSON. (17 May 1900)


Aldine PRESS

The following information extracted from the Grayling, Crawford Co., MI Newspaper Avalanche. NOTE: The date at the end of each extract indicates the date of the publication:
-Miss Aldine PRESS went down to Grayling Saturday to remain over Sunday visiting her friend Miss OWEN, merchant FINN's book-keeper. - Otsego Co. Herald. (16 Feb 1888)

-Miss Aldine PRESS, of Gaylord, is the guest of Miss Vena JONES. (16 Aug 1888)

-Miss Aldine PRESS begins her school at Frederic, Crawford county, next Monday. - Ot. Co. Herald. (11 Sep 1890)


James MCFADDEN

The following information extracted from the Grayling, Crawford Co., MI Newspaper Avalanche. NOTE: The date at the end of each extract indicates the date of the publication:
-James McFADDEN, barber at Otsego Lake, has fallen heir to $5,000 left him by an uncle in Ireland. McFADDEN's home is in Owen Sound, Ont. - Otsego Co. Herald. (16 Feb 1888)


Rose OWENS

The following information extracted from the Grayling, Crawford Co., MI Newspaper Avalanche. NOTE: The date at the end of each extract indicates the date of the publication:
-Miss Rose OWENS, book-keeper for J. M. FINN, resigned her position last week for the purpose of accepting a more lucrative one in a seminary at Fentonville, and left for that place last Monday. (1 Mar 1888)


John PIERSON

The following information extracted from the Grayling, Crawford Co., MI Newspaper Avalanche. NOTE: The date at the end of each extract indicates the date of the publication:
-BORN-On the 12th inst., to Mr. and Mrs. John PIERSON, two boys weighing 9 and 7 1/2 pounds. All doing finely. (15 Mar 1888)


AVALANCHE

The following information extracted from the Grayling, Crawford Co., MI Newspaper Avalanche. NOTE: The date at the end of each extract indicates the date of the publication:
-THE AVALANCHE.
On the first of May, 1879, the AVALANCHE was launched in the literary world by Messrs. MAUER and BROWN, who are remembered by a few of our older citizens, and who published the first four numbers, when Mr. BROWN was succeeded by W. A. MASTERS, who remains a citizen of our city. Mr. BROWN was retained as local editor until June 25, when he returned to his former home. Nov. 19th Mr. MASTERS retired from the firm and MAURER went it alone for a little more than a year, when Messrs, Sailing, Hanson & Co. took possession of the office, and in February 1881, discharged Mr. MAURER for a personal attack on one of our citizens under the guise of correspondence. H. C. McKINLEY, the present editor and proprietor of the Herald, at Gaylord, was employed by them and under his management the AVALANCHE was improved in many ways, but had never yet been a financial success, the ledger on the first of Feb. 1882 showing a large balance on the wrong side. At that date we purchased the office and in our first issue said "It shall be our aim to advance every legitimate interest of Grayling and of Crawford county in all business, agricultural and educational matters, giving to our foreign readers a full knowledge of the many advantages we possess to induce immigration toward us."
How well we have kept our pledge we leave our readers to decide. Those brethren of the press who have developed an enterprise of this kind in a new country can fully appreciate the trials we have had to undergo, but we are pleased, and somewhat proud to say that the AVALANCHE is to-day on a solid foundation. We ahve added largely to the material of the office, keeping pace with the demand for better work and are willing to compare with any office in the State. But we are not satisfied to stop here and propose to continually add to the equipment, so that nothing required here need be sent to other cities. The present issue is the close of Vol. IX, and we propose to show our appreciation of past support by a new departure in
OUR SUBSCRIPTION PRICE.
Hereafter all subscribers who pay in advance will receive the AVALANCHE for one dollar per year. All advances now paid will be credited forward in proportion. All in arrears will be charged the old price. We trust this may be an incentive that will clear up our subscription list and give us promptly over a thousand dollars now due, which we will add to the office for the benefit of all.
The AVALANCHE will continue to be a republican paper (without wobbling,) but independent and fearless. We shall be our own judge of what is proper to admit to our columns and shall keep them clean and free from all personalities. Whatever criticisms we may make of official or political action shall be for what we consider for the public good and entirely devoid of any shadow of personal spite and we shall continue to labor for the advancement of this section.
We congratulate our citizens on the progress of the place for the past six years which we believe is equal to any in the state, and promises permanency and a continuance of growth.
We acknowledge with thanks the many courtesies that have been extended to us, and the business patronage, for which we believe we have given value received. To our enemies personal or political, we say we have intentionally wronged none, and if unintentional wrong has been done we are ready to be forgiven.

(19 Apr 1888)

-BURNING OF THE AVALANCHE
MONDAY NIGHT, DECEMBER 12, 1904.
(From The Grayling Times.)
The Avalanche is no more. At 12:30 Monday night fire took it. That is, it took the plant and building and material. Dr. PALMER, the heart and brain of the paper, is left and takes the loss severe - irreparable - as it is, with the nerve and manliness that we all knew was in him.
One of the landmarks of the village, the Avalanche building, located on Peninsular avenue, lies a mass of charred and shapeless ruins. In it was between $7,000 and $8,000 worth of presses, printing materials and machinery, paper stock, gasoline engine, agricultural implements, wagons, sleighs, cutters, sewing machines, the doctor's well equipped law library, private papers, insurance stationery and the thousand and one things of value that accumulate in the affairs of a busy man - and especially so with a man like Dr. PALMER, who is editor, doctor, lawyer, court commissioner, implement dealer, insurance agent, prosecuting attorney, land agent and general legal, social and moral adviser and friend to half the people of Crawford county. And it is all in ashes.
Situated as the building was, practically in the center of a rather compactly built up block, it could not have been long after the fire started before it was discovered. Will WALLACE, living almost directly back of the Avalanche building, probably saw the fire first. When he reached the building he says the flames were confined to a rather small space, apparently in and about the woodpile which lay in the corner against the partition between the big wareroom and the composing room. He turned in one of the first alarms.
Soon after he reached the building others came. Of course there is no positive evidence as to the origin of the fire, but those first on the spot all agree in stating that there was a strong odor of kerosene or gasoline. Not over a gallon of either was ever kept in the building at any one time, and both Dr. PALMER and Foreman AEBLI say there was not at the time of the fire more than half a gallon of either in the cans.
The building was a one-story frame, sheated, clapboarded and plastered. It was originally built some 20 years ago for a skating rink, and was originally all in one immense room about 50 feet wide by something over 125 feet long. On the south side a shed about 75 feet long by 14 or 16 feet wide had been added. the front half of the building had been partitioned off into composing room, stock room and two large front offices, all communicating with doors. The rear portion of the structure was used for storing wagons, sleighs, agricultural implements, sewing machines and a lot of miscellaneous goods.
The fire, as stated, started about the cneter of the building. It was some time after the fire was discovered before anything like a stream of water could be had, although both hose companies were promptly on hand, and in the absence of water, began carrying out everything moveable from those portions of the building when the fire permitted.
The doctor saved a major portion of his office furniture and fixtures, insurance and private papers and all but about 300 volumes of his fine law library. The bound files of the paper were saved in good condition, the files of the past two years, not being bound and stored in the stock room, were burned. Parties in the county having files of the paper for 1903 and 1904 - volumes 25 and 26 - are requested to bring them in, as the doctor is anxious to make the files complete.
In the composing room were something near a hundred cases of job type, outside of the newspaper type, with stands, etc., an unusually large collection of cuts and plates, the big imposing stone and the usual composing room furniture.
Adjoining this in the press room were the two-and-one-half horse power gasoline engine, a rebuilt Campbell country press, put in some eighteen months ago, a big Gordon jobber with the necessary shafting, etc. Opening out of this room was the stock room, containing perhaps $150 worth of paper stock. all three of these rooms with their contents were practically a total loss, the big expensive presses being so warped and twisted by the heat as probably to be beyond repair.
In the northwest front office room were the old handpress, the small job presss, paper cutter, smaller imposing stones, tables etc. From this room the small job press, paper cutter and handpress seem to have come out of the ordeal in such shape that it may be possible to use them. In this room were also two or three cupboards, stored full of cataloges, books, papers, etc., all of which are a total loss.
The room in the southwest corner of the building the doctor had recently fitted up handsomely for an office. The safe, three large office desks, tables, etc., besides the shelving stretching half along the south side of the large room on which were the doctor's law, medical and a large collection of miscellaneous books. Most of the contents of this room were saved in more or less damaged condition. The safe is badly cracked, and has not been opened, but it is probable the contents - mostly notes, mortgages, contracts, insurance policies, ledgers, etc., are probably all right. Immediately back of this room was a smaller consultation office, seldom used except for storage purposes, but full of miscellaneous articles, principally shelving and cabinets full of various documents of value, books, etc. this was also practically a total loss.
The big wareroom in the rear of the building, and also the shed mentioned above, were used for the storage of wagons, etc. In the item of wagons alone the loss will reach over $4,600. the doctor finds it more or less difficult to estimate the total loss of the farming implements, sewing machines, etc. Fortunately at this season the stock of implements was low.
"Ther's one thing I am thankful for - very," said the doctor Tuesday morning, "and that is the more remarkable portion of my law library was saved, together with most of my private papers and those left with me for safe keeping. Really, it might have been sorse," he added cheerfully.
"Except some of the implement and wagon stock, I am also thankful, it was all mine and all paid for.
"Insurance? Yes - $1,000. That was all. The rest I lose.
"What shall I do? I shall get out the Avalanche as usual. Perhaps not exactly on time, but it will come out regularly, just the same. It will probably be impossible to rebuild before spring, but I'll do it then. Meantime, Mr. SPENCER of THE TIMES has extended me the courtesy of his office and until I can make other arrangements I shall avail myself of his kind offer.
"Of course the incidental loss in the way of the regular job printing business of the office, a large part of the stationery, etc., will add considerably to the total. I figure roughly that my loss above my insurance will be about $6,000 or $6,500."
And the doctor, with Foreman AEBLI went cheerfully to work sorting out and arranging the miscellaneous collection of stuff piled into the store room of the new MICHELSON store, where the doctor will make temporary headquarters.
Many a man makes more fuss over loosing his jack-knife than does the doctor over this loss of the accumulation of a long and busy career.
And the loss to the community is great. It is extremely fortunate that the bound files of the paper were rescued. In them are particularly the only record of the growth and progress of the village and the county and their loss would have been indeed irreparable.
For years - something like twenty-five - for the most of that time the only paper published in the county - the Avalanche files contain the records of births and deaths, of legal advertisements, of the progress of business affairs and the material growth of the village and county - and about the only record. And all the social doings and the personal comings and going. After a time when these things are wanted for local history and biographical matter, the files will be appreciated. Therefore, it is good they escaped - good beyond the satisfaction they afford the doctor - for they are in a sense the monument to his life work in this community.
Across the alley north from the burned building, distant perhaps 13 or 14 feet, is the residence of Dr. S. N. INSLEY. Broken windows and scorched cornices, a charred strip of the high board fence and badly blistered paint are about the only evidences of the proximity of the fire. Here was where the fire laddies and workers did some excellent work in saving the doctor's house. "I didn't need the heat from my new furnace for a while, I can tell you," said Dr. INSLEY, "and I am very thankful to have been let off so easily."
On the other side, probably distant a few feet further, the house of J. P. JENSON was even more severely scorched and the windows broken practically all over the house. Not much serious damage was done here either, and Mr. JENSON said he certainly felt in luck. "That woodpile is a solid chunk of ice," said he, pointing to a pile between his house and the burned building, "but I guess next July will thaw it out."
"There was hardly a breath of wind stirring at the time of the fire," said Postmaster BATES, "which of course accounts for the salvation of the buildings in the block. Had the wind been up even a little bit there is no telling what the losses might have been. "There is one lesson of the fire worth calling attention to, in my judgement, and that is the necessity for more practical fire protection. I guess the village system is all right, but there was certainly something amiss in its application this time - and it ought not to occur again."
In a hurried round among the leading business men of the village THE TIMES man found the most hearty expressions of sincere sympathy for the doctor and the loss of the Avalanche. The doctor's loss in dollars is a severe one - in something that is better than dollars, associations, mementoes, keepsakes, and a hundred nameless little things, it is severer - but with every loss there is some measure of compensation and the fire has assuredly brought this in the universal expressions of personal esteem and friendship and sympathy from his fellow townsmen and business associates.
THE TIMES can give room in its meager columns to but few of these, but they were all heartfelt and genuine.
R. HANSON -
"I was out of the village at the time of the fire and I think nothing could have grieved me more than to hear that the Avalanche had burned. It seems almost like a personal loss. Dr. PALMER certainly has my sincerest sympathy. I understand he will replace the plant as quickly as possible and I am glad of it."

M. A. BATES -
"I do not think any fire that ever occurred in the village - even when the money loss was greater - called out so many expressions of genuine sympathy."

N. P. OLSON -
"The loss is a very unfortunate one, not only for the doctor, but for the town. I am heartily sorry.

A. KRAUS -
"I am very, very sorry for the doctor's loss. It is bad every way."

R. D. CONNINE -
"It was a bad fire - burning up the accumulation of many years. The doctor has my sincere sympathy."

N. MICHELSON -
"It was one of the worst fires that could possibly have occurred in the town. The doctor has the sympathy of everybody.

DR. S. N. INSLEY -
"I can't find words to express my feelings in the matter. Say the very strongest thing that language will express. And the doctor stands up under it like a man, too, don't he?"

H. A. BAUMAN -
"I was out of town at the time and could hardly have felt worse if it had been my own loss. And the lesson of it is that Grayling must reorganize on her fire protection and get and keep things in readiness to meet such issues more effectively. The doctor has my sincere sympathy.

DR. W. M. WOODWORTH -
"Too bad - too bad. The work of half a lifetime gone in an hour. It is too bad."

J. M. JONES -
"Everybody is sorry. I have heard more expressions of sympathy that I ever heard about a fire before."

W. JORGENSON -
"Having had so recent an experience myself I can feel for the doctor. It was a bad fire for the town as well as the doctor. We ought to have a more efficient fire protection."

FRED NARRIN -
"It couldn't have been much worse. I am sorry for the doctor's loss. It was bad all around."

MRS. J. WOODWORTH -
"I feel the deepest sympathy for the doctor. The money loss is bad enough, but he was always so willing to give the use of his columns for the good of the village and so kindly and generous, that someway I feel there sould be something more substantial than expressions of sympathy. It is a real loss to all of us."

L. FOURNIER -
"It is hard to realize that the old Avalanche building - so long a landmark - is not here anymore. It was a bad fire and I sympathize with the doctor."

J. w. SORENSON -
"I'm awful sorry for the doctor and I guess everybody else is. I hear nothing but sympathy for him."

H. JOSEPH -
"I'm awful sorry for the doctor and I guess everybody else is. I hear nothing but sympathy for him."

H. JOSEPH -
"It's bad for the doctor and I am very sorry about it. It was a bad fire."

J. A. EVERETT -
"Sympathy is all right, but I feel that something else ought to be done by the business men of Grayling. I am ready at any time to do my share."

George L. ALEXANDER -
"The loss is certainly a very severe blow and the doctor has the sincere sympathy of the whole community."

George LANGEVIN -
"I feel like every one else - very sorry for the doctor. It is too bad."

C. O. McCULLOUGH -
"I am sure the doctor has and certainly deserves the sympathy of every man, woman and child in the county."

A. B. FAILING -
"I am very sorry for the doctor. the loss is a heavy one."

Rolla BRINK -
"Everybody smypathizes with the doctor. We all known how hard he has worked to build up the paper and it's a shame to have it all go up in smoke."

J. J. COLLEN -
"The doctor has by heartiest sympathy in his loss."

P. M. HOYT -
"I felt almost as bad about the fire as if it had been my own. It was certainly very unfortunate."

M. HANSON -
"I went up to Lovells Tuesday morning after the fire and without going down town, so I first heard of it when I got there. I could not believe it was true. I am very sorry for the doctor, indeed."

In conclusion THE TIMES wants publicly to extend its heartfelt fraternal sympathy to the Avalanche and express the hope that it will come phoenix-like from the ashes of the old building, with new plumage and tail-feathers spread - with beak and talons (does an Avalanche have such things?) all ready to do battle for its principles and help on the good cause of the development of Grayling and Crawford county in the future as in the past. (15 Dec 1904)

-Tuesday morning, as soon as Mr. J. SPENCER learned of the fire in the AVALANCHE office, he tendered the use of his office and material to enable us to get out this week's issue, which we were glad to accept and assure him of our fullest appreciation of his courtesy. He could sympathize with reason as he suffered a similar experience a few years ago in Gladwin. (15 Dec 1904)

MIDNIGHT FIRE.
Sunday morning between twelve and one o'clock, our village - or the most of it, was awakened by the alarm of fire. We were sleeping the sweet sleep of "Youth and innocence" when disturbed by a terrible thumping on the door by night watchman NOLAN, who tipped his hat and advised us that this office was burning.
We came down to see, and found the wood house nearly consumed, and the adjoining store room going fast, while the south end of the office was a perfect sheet of flame, which quickly ate its way through doors and windows into the press room.
The "boys with the machine" were on their muscle and fought the fire inch by inch, until they conquered. No flame passed the center of the building, but the smoke was intolorable and the deluge of water did considerable damage. The water pressure was all that could be wished and there was never two lines of hose handled more perfectly.
While they were fighting the fire scores of our citizens had moved our law office, books, papers and furniture across the street and large quantities of stock and pringint material, though the latter was badly damaged by smoke and some by water.
At this writing the loss has not been invoiced but is estimated at from $1,200.00 to $1,500.00, insured in the North River, of New York on the building, and the German, of Pittsburg, on the printing outfit.
The fire was undoubtedly incendiary as there was never any fire in the building where it started. We fear there may be a fire-bug in our midst. (21 Nov 1907)

-We are especially indebted to A. KRAUS for the storage of our goods taken from the office, during the fire, Sunday morning, and to G. L. ALEXANDER, for caring for papers, and offering us the use of his office for storing, as we might wish, and the same offer from Dr. H. H. MERRIMAN. All of which is appreciated. (21 Nov 1907)

-We are glad to be alive, and glad that we live in Grayling. The prompt work of citizens during our fire, and the words of sympathy and good cheer since, are better than gold. (21 Nov 1907)

-All our readers are respectfully asked to look clear down in the bottom of their pocket, and if they find a dollar or more that ought to be in mine, send it in or bring it, for I could use it all just now in my business, covering up the office ashes. (21 Nov 1907)

-We are under obligation to the Roscommon News, for the privilege of using their office and press for this issue. Our forms and paper were taken there yesterday noon and returned at 8:30 in the evening, so that we are out practically on time. We have never missed an issue since 1881, and felt it was too late to begin. (21 Nov 1907)


Ernest STRICKLAND

The following information extracted from the Grayling, Crawford Co., MI Newspaper Avalanche. NOTE: The date at the end of each extract indicates the date of the publication:
-BORN-Tuesday, April 10th, to Mr. and Mrs. Ernest STRICKLAND, of Blaine, a daughter, nine pounds and one half. (26 Apr 1888)

-Died-At his home in Blaine Township, Sunday, Dec. 21. Major Ernest STRICKLAND, age 29 years. (25 Dec 1890)

-Mrs. STRICKLAND arrived from Owosso, Tuesday evening, too late to attend the funeral of her son. (25 Dec 1890)


John D. WRIGHT

The following information extracted from the Grayling, Crawford Co., MI Newspaper Avalanche. NOTE: The date at the end of each extract indicates the date of the publication:
-John D. WRIGHT has gone to Grayling, where he will hold the position of millwright for Salling, Hanson & Co. - Ogemaw Co. Herald. (3 May 1888)


Geo. KNIGHT

The following information extracted from the Grayling, Crawford Co., MI Newspaper Avalanche. NOTE: The date at the end of each extract indicates the date of the publication:
-DIED.
In this village, Friday, May 4th, Geo. KNIGHT, aged 20 years.
Deceased had resided here for about six years, with his parents, growing from youth to manhood. He was ill but four days, and his sudden death was a severe shock to his family and friends. the funeral services, at the M. E. Church, Sunday morning was largely attended. (10 May 1888)


Treffle LATOUR

The following information extracted from the Grayling, Crawford Co., MI Newspaper Avalanche. NOTE: The date at the end of each extract indicates the date of the publication:
-Treffle LATOUR was killed by a log dropping from a skidway and crushing his skull last Thursday at the Portage Lake camp of Salling, Hanson & Co. The body was sent to Montreal for burial. (17 May 1888)


Henry FITTINGER

The following information extracted from the Grayling, Crawford Co., MI Newspaper Avalanche. NOTE: The date at the end of each extract indicates the date of the publication:
-A fatal accident occurred on the Hauptman branch railroad, two miles south of West Branch, Wednesday night at 8 o'clock. While coupling cars, a brakeman named Henry FITTINGER of Unionville was almost instantly killed by being crushed in the body between a car and log. (17 May 1888)


E. RICHARDSON

The following information extracted from the Grayling, Crawford Co., MI Newspaper Avalanche. NOTE: The date at the end of each extract indicates the date of the publication:
-E. RICHARDSON, a deputy sheriff of South Branch, was arrested last week on complaint of J. R. CASTENHOLZ for assault and battery, and tried in Justice McELROY's court by a jury, who found him guilty of assault. The court imposed a fine of five dollars and let the county pay the costs. the whole matter grew out of the differences arising over the election in that township. (10 Aug 1899)


George CHEESBROUGH

The following information extracted from the Grayling, Crawford Co., MI Newspaper Avalanche. NOTE: The date at the end of each extract indicates the date of the publication:
-DIED.
At Grayling, Thursday, May 10th, George CHEESBROUGH.
the deceased has been suffering for years from Lithiasis, which became complicated so that surgical aid had to be invoked. Dr. C. T. NEWKIRK, of Bay City was called in counsel and all that science and skill could command was done without avail.
Mr. CHEESBROUGH had been in the employ of Salling, Hanson & Co. for about three years as lumber inspector, and was very popular with the firm and in the community.
The body was taken to Greenville for interment. (17 May 1888)


Frank FLARRITY

The following information extracted from the Grayling, Crawford Co., MI Newspaper Avalanche. NOTE: The date at the end of each extract indicates the date of the publication:
-BORN-In Grayling, May 23, to Mr. and Mrs. Frank FLARRITY, a son. (24 May 1888)


Tor BURNSON

The following information extracted from the Grayling, Crawford Co., MI Newspaper Avalanche. NOTE: The date at the end of each extract indicates the date of the publication:
-BORN-In Grayling, May 23, to Mr. and Mrs. Tor BURNSON, a daughter. (24 May 1888)


Jacob FILLEY

The following information extracted from the Grayling, Crawford Co., MI Newspaper Avalanche. NOTE: The date at the end of each extract indicates the date of the publication:
-Mr. and Mrs. Jacob FILLEY lost a young child by death last Monday. Funeral services at the M. E. church on Tuesday. (31 May 1888)

-Mr. and Mrs. J. FILLEY have the sympathy of the community for the loss of their little one, who died yesterday. (15 Aug 1889)


H. G. STEVENS

The following information extracted from the Grayling, Crawford Co., MI Newspaper Avalanche. NOTE: The date at the end of each extract indicates the date of the publication:
-BORN-Wednesday, May 30th, to Mr. and Mrs. H. G. STEVENS, a son, weight 10 3/4 pounds. (7 Jun 1888)


Joseph HUGHES

The following information extracted from the Grayling, Crawford Co., MI Newspaper Avalanche. NOTE: The date at the end of each extract indicates the date of the publication:
-BEAVER CREEK ITEMS.
A daughter arrived at the home of Mr. and Mrs. Joseph HUGHES the first of the month. All are doing well. (14 Jun 1888)


Frank TRUMBLY

The following information extracted from the Grayling, Crawford Co., MI Newspaper Avalanche. NOTE: The date at the end of each extract indicates the date of the publication:
-BORN-On June 11th, to Mr. and Mrs. Frank TRUMBLY, a son. (14 Jun 1888)


Garret MEAD

The following information extracted from the Grayling, Crawford Co., MI Newspaper Avalanche. NOTE: The date at the end of each extract indicates the date of the publication:
-Garret MEAD started for a visit to the "ould sod," (Ireland) last Saturday. He will be gone about three months. (14 Jun 1888)


James BALL

The following information extracted from the Grayling, Crawford Co., MI Newspaper Avalanche. NOTE: The date at the end of each extract indicates the date of the publication:
-James BALL, father of Conductor BALL, former resident of Grayling, was found dead in bed, last Friday morning, in West Bay City. (14 Jun 1888)


Albert H. GRUND

The following information extracted from the Grayling, Crawford Co., MI Newspaper Avalanche. NOTE: The date at the end of each extract indicates the date of the publication:
-CIRCUIT COURT.
Trial of Dan MAHONEY for the murder of Albert H. GRUND, at Sand's camp, on the 6th of March.
The adjourned term of Circuit Court was opened last week Tuesday, for the first murder trial in Crawford county. The people were represented by Pros. Att'y. J. O. HADLEY assisted by Geo. L. ALEXANDER and J. Maurice FINN. The prisoner was defended by J. K. WRIGHT.
Great interest was taken by our citizens and the courtroom was filled with spectators. The prisoner appeared as little excited as any one present. The panel of the jury was exhausted without a selection and an order issued by the court for the drawing of fifty additional jurymen to be present at nine o'clock Wednesday morning. The time till Wednesday noon was used in examination of jurors and the following were selected, at that time, Wm. H. SHERMAN, H. DAVENPORT, C. F. KELLEY, Elias DECK, Wm. PEACOCK, H. T. SHAFER, M. DYER, C. Z. HORTON, A. S. BUCK, L. E. OSTRANDER, Chas. BARBER and J. A. BREAKY. At this point the defendants attorney moved to quash the information for the reason that it was not verified by the Pros. Att'y. or any other party. The motion was denied on the ground, that the error, if it be one, is merely a clerical omission, and further that the objection was made too late.
The defendant excused another juryman and after several challenges, Neil PATTON and Jno. J. COVENTRY were selected in place of M. DYER and Elias DECK, and the jury were sworn.
Geo. L. ALEXANDER opened the case for the people by a brief statement of the facts in the case as they expected to show.
The first witness called was O. PALMER, who testified to the condition of the body at post mortem examination.
Dr. F. F. THATCHER testified to the condition of the patient from the time of his first visit, immediately following the assault to the time of his death, and detailed his treatment. Dr. Haynes THATCHER corroborated the statements of his brother, being with him in the treatment of the case.
Dr. N. H. TRAVER testified to the facts connected with the post mortem examination, minutely describing the fracture of the skull, and the condition of the brain beneath the wound.
Dr. Geo. M. F. DAVIS was called in the same connection and testified to the same facts.
John KERRY was the next witness. He was present at the time of the affray. The testimony showed that the fight began in the house, where MAHONEY struck the first blow. It was continued out doors where MAHONEY seized a lumbering whiffltree and struck GRUND on the head, and struck at him again after he had fallen. He expressed a wish that the S.... of a B..... would die, after GRUND had been carried from the ground.
Ed. .......... was called, but his evidence was only corroborative of the beginning of the trouble.
James COLLINS' testimony exactly corroborated that of KERRY, as to the assault with the whiffletree, which was produced in court. It is a murderous weapon about three feet long and nearly three inches in diameter and heavily ironed.
Christ. LARSON was the next witness, and his testimony exactly corroborated that of the others, as did also.
Geo. OLESON and Olvin OLESON, the latter of whom had to be examined through a Swedish interpreter.
Sheriff McCULLOUGH was the last witness called for the people, who testified merely as to the arrest. The people rested their case reserving the right to introduce two farther witnesses if the officer returned with them.
The defence was opened by Mr. WRIGHT and Edward BROWN called to the witness stand. His evidence did not differ from that of the former witnesses, except that he did not see MAHONEY strike the first blow in the shanty, and his manner, more than his words favored MAHONEY.
He was followed by MAHONEY in his own behalf. He claimed that GRUND was the aggressor, and that what was done was in the heat of passion, and from personal fear of GRUND's continuing the assault. He admitted on cross examination that he had been convicted of Highway Robbery and served two years in the states prison at Ionia. His appearance throughout the trial was that of a disinterested spectator, except while in the witness chair he exhibited some heat under the searching cross examination.
J. Maurice FINN occupied forty minutes in the opening speech for the people and his friends were well pleased with his maiden effort in an important case. He was followed by Messrs. FITCH and WRIGHT for the defence, and the closing argument by Geo. L. ALEXANDER.
The Judge's charge was plain and unprejudiced and fair, and the jury retired. At midnight they had not reached a verdict and the Judge instructed the sheriff to receive their verdict, sealed, when they should agree, and file with the clerk, and the court adjourned to 9 A. M. It was four o'clock before the jury agree., only differing in the degree of the crime.
At nine o'clock the verdict of man-slaughter was rendered, and the sentence of thirteen years at hard labor in the states prison at Jackson, prnounced. The prisoner received it with stoical indifference, and at noon started in the charge of Sheriff McCULLOUGH for his prison home. The trial was ably and fairly conducted and the result receives general approval. (5 Jul 1888)


Dan MAHONEY

The following information extracted from the Grayling, Crawford Co., MI Newspaper Avalanche. NOTE: The date at the end of each extract indicates the date of the publication:
-CIRCUIT COURT.
Trial of Dan MAHONEY for the murder of Albert H. GRUND, at Sand's camp, on the 6th of March.
The adjourned term of Circuit Court was opened last week Tuesday, for the first murder trial in Crawford county. The people were represented by Pros. Att'y. J. O. HADLEY assisted by Geo. L. ALEXANDER and J. Maurice FINN. The prisoner was defended by J. K. WRIGHT.
Great interest was taken by our citizens and the courtroom was filled with spectators. The prisoner appeared as little excited as any one present. The panel of the jury was exhausted without a selection and an order issued by the court for the drawing of fifty additional jurymen to be present at nine o'clock Wednesday morning. The time till Wednesday noon was used in examination of jurors and the following were selected, at that time, Wm. H. SHERMAN, H. DAVENPORT, C. F. KELLEY, Elias DECK, Wm. PEACOCK, H. T. SHAFER, M. DYER, C. Z. HORTON, A. S. BUCK, L. E. OSTRANDER, Chas. BARBER and J. A. BREAKY. At this point the defendants attorney moved to quash the information for the reason that it was not verified by the Pros. Att'y. or any other party. The motion was denied on the ground, that the error, if it be one, is merely a clerical omission, and further that the objection was made too late.
The defendant excused another juryman and after several challenges, Neil PATTON and Jno. J. COVENTRY were selected in place of M. DYER and Elias DECK, and the jury were sworn.
Geo. L. ALEXANDER opened the case for the people by a brief statement of the facts in the case as they expected to show.
The first witness called was O. PALMER, who testified to the condition of the body at post mortem examination.
Dr. F. F. THATCHER testified to the condition of the patient from the time of his first visit, immediately following the assault to the time of his death, and detailed his treatment. Dr. Haynes THATCHER corroborated the statements of his brother, being with him in the treatment of the case.
Dr. N. H. TRAVER testified to the facts connected with the post mortem examination, minutely describing the fracture of the skull, and the condition of the brain beneath the wound.
Dr. Geo. M. F. DAVIS was called in the same connection and testified to the same facts.
John KERRY was the next witness. He was present at the time of the affray. The testimony showed that the fight began in the house, where MAHONEY struck the first blow. It was continued out doors where MAHONEY seized a lumbering whiffltree and struck GRUND on the head, and struck at him again after he had fallen. He expressed a wish that the S.... of a B..... would die, after GRUND had been carried from the ground.
Ed. .......... was called, but his evidence was only corroborative of the beginning of the trouble.
James COLLINS' testimony exactly corroborated that of KERRY, as to the assault with the whiffletree, which was produced in court. It is a murderous weapon about three feet long and nearly three inches in diameter and heavily ironed.
Christ. LARSON was the next witness, and his testimony exactly corroborated that of the others, as did also.
Geo. OLESON and Olvin OLESON, the latter of whom had to be examined through a Swedish interpreter.
Sheriff McCULLOUGH was the last witness called for the people, who testified merely as to the arrest. The people rested their case reserving the right to introduce two farther witnesses if the officer returned with them.
The defence was opened by Mr. WRIGHT and Edward BROWN called to the witness stand. His evidence did not differ from that of the former witnesses, except that he did not see MAHONEY strike the first blow in the shanty, and his manner, more than his words favored MAHONEY.
He was followed by MAHONEY in his own behalf. He claimed that GRUND was the aggressor, and that what was done was in the heat of passion, and from personal fear of GRUND's continuing the assault. He admitted on cross examination that he had been convicted of Highway Robbery and served two years in the states prison at Ionia. His appearance throughout the trial was that of a disinterested spectator, except while in the witness chair he exhibited some heat under the searching cross examination.
J. Maurice FINN occupied forty minutes in the opening speech for the people and his friends were well pleased with his maiden effort in an important case. He was followed by Messrs. FITCH and WRIGHT for the defence, and the closing argument by Geo. L. ALEXANDER.
The Judge's charge was plain and unprejudiced and fair, and the jury retired. At midnight they had not reached a verdict and the Judge instructed the sheriff to receive their verdict, sealed, when they should agree, and file with the clerk, and the court adjourned to 9 A. M. It was four o'clock before the jury agree., only differing in the degree of the crime.
At nine o'clock the verdict of man-slaughter was rendered, and the sentence of thirteen years at hard labor in the states prison at Jackson, prnounced. The prisoner received it with stoical indifference, and at noon started in the charge of Sheriff McCULLOUGH for his prison home. The trial was ably and fairly conducted and the result receives general approval. (5 Jul 1888)


J. HERRON

The following information extracted from the Grayling, Crawford Co., MI Newspaper Avalanche. NOTE: The date at the end of each extract indicates the date of the publication:
-BORN-On yesterday morning, July 3d to Mr. and Mrs. J. HERRON a daughter. They celebrate. (5 Jul 1888)


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