Make your own free website on Tripod.com
The Avalanche The Ward Family Web Pages

Extractions From the "Avalanche" a Crawford Co., MI Newspaper 1879-1940's

Notes


Game Warden MCALROY

The following information extracted from the Grayling, Crawford Co., MI Newspaper Avalanche. NOTE: The date at the end of each extract indicates the date of the publication:
-HARDGROVE HAPPENINGS.
Game Warden McALROY, of Lovell took supper with H. S. BUCK Saturday. (15 Jul 1909)


Bert WILCOX

The following information extracted from the Grayling, Crawford Co., MI Newspaper Avalanche. NOTE: The date at the end of each extract indicates the date of the publication:
-MAPLE FOREST BRIEFS.
The stork made a visit to Mr. and Mrs. Bert WILCOX last Wednesday, leaving a 7 pound girl. All is doing well. Bert Wears a big smile now. (15 Jul 1909)


HYATT

The following information extracted from the Grayling, Crawford Co., MI Newspaper Avalanche. NOTE: The date at the end of each extract indicates the date of the publication:
-HARDGROVE HAPPENINGS.
Born-To Mr. and Mrs. HYATT, a son. (29 Jul 1909)


B. H. HELLEN

The following information extracted from the Grayling, Crawford Co., MI Newspaper Avalanche. NOTE: The date at the end of each extract indicates the date of the publication:
-B. H. HELLEN who is spending the summer at his cottage at Higgins lake left Wednesday afternoon for Chicago in response to a telegran stating that his home there had been ransacked by robbers sometime Sunday night. - Roscommon Herald. (12 Aug 1909)


John PATTERSON

The following information extracted from the Grayling, Crawford Co., MI Newspaper Avalanche. NOTE: The date at the end of each extract indicates the date of the publication:
-John PATTERSON, a former resident of Frederic, is now foreman on the big farm of Mr. GARDNER, just across the town line from Beaver Crekk, south. They have 120 acres cleared this year, an entire section nearly fenced with woven wire and crops looking fine. A four acre field was sown to alfalfa alone last month, and is as fine a catch as needs to be seen. They propose to make it a "Garden Farm." Fine buildings are being erected. We shall keep an eye on it.(12 Aug 1909)


Ray AMIDON

The following information extracted from the Grayling, Crawford Co., MI Newspaper Avalanche. NOTE: The date at the end of each extract indicates the date of the publication:
-Ray AMIDON has taken a position in Hathaway's jewelry store, where he will have an opportunity of displaying his ability as an engraver, for which he fitted himself by a full course in the Detroit Institute. (19 Aug 1909)


Alvin LACHAPELLE

The following information extracted from the Grayling, Crawford Co., MI Newspaper Avalanche. NOTE: The date at the end of each extract indicates the date of the publication:
-Alvin LaCHAPELLE has served his connection with the AVALANCHE office, after nearly a year and half start in learning the "Art Preservative of all Art." He is now engaged as one of the night freight wrestlers at the depot. (26 Aug 1909)


William St. JOHN

The following information extracted from the Grayling, Crawford Co., MI Newspaper Avalanche. NOTE: The date at the end of each extract indicates the date of the publication:
-A FATAL ACCIDENT.
Last Saturday night there occured, on the railroad about a mile south of the village, a fatal accident which should have a sufficient object lesson to the community to control for all time the use of intoxicating liquors as a beverage. During the afternoon, and till after midnight, William St. JOHN with two of his fellow laborers were drinking at different saloons, so that they were intoxicated, and all judgement blotted from their mind and brain. During the afternoon Mrs. St. JOHN had gone to her father's at Horrigan, four miles south. Her husband agreed to go there in the evening, but in his drunken condition put it off until time for the midnight express South, which he boarded as blind baggage, evidently intending to beat his way, and alight at the top of the hill, where the speed of the train is always slow, as he had done several times before.
It is apparent that he mistook the south semiphore light for the Horrigan switch and attempted to alight there, or that he fell from the train, where he was dragged for about forty feet. One leg was broken and one arm crushed by being run over, and his skull crushed in at the back of the head making death instantaneous.
The switch engine had taken a train of logs over the hill in advance of the express and waited there for them to pass, and on their return discovered the body. Arriving here they called the sheriff, and with a flat car ran back to where the body was found, and brought it to the undertakers, where Coronor INSLEY and the sheriff decided no inquest was required.
The deceased was 26 years of age and leaves a mother and sister, with his wife and child to mourn his going. A man just entering on the prime of life, a good citizen, an industrious and an honest man, with bright prospect for a happy home and life, but for the blighting curse of strong drink, is stricken down, leaving a ruined home with a crushed and bleeding heart of his young wife, and a sad story to be learned by his infant child as years may bring intelligence to understand why there is no father in the home. Will the lesson be learned?
The funeral service was held at the M. E. church and the body interred in Elmwood cemetery. The attendance at the funeral proves the deepest sympathy of our people for the stricken ones. (26 Aug 1909)


Robert POPENFOS

The following information extracted from the Grayling, Crawford Co., MI Newspaper Avalanche. NOTE: The date at the end of each extract indicates the date of the publication:
-LOVELLS LOCALS.
Robert POPENFOS was hapily surprised Wednesday morning by the arrival of his father and mother from Ohio. (26 Aug 1909)


Bernhard CHRISTENSON

The following information extracted from the Grayling, Crawford Co., MI Newspaper Avalanche. NOTE: The date at the end of each extract indicates the date of the publication:
-Bernhard CHRISTENSON of Beaver Creek has gone to Flint, to accept a position at the Buick Auto Factory. (2 Sep 1909)


Gusta MCGONIGAL

The following information extracted from the Grayling, Crawford Co., MI Newspaper Avalanche. NOTE: The date at the end of each extract indicates the date of the publication:
-LOVELLS LOCALS.
School commenced Tuesday the 7th. Miss Gusta McGONIGAL is the teacher. (16 Sep 1909)


J. BLAINE

The following information extracted from the Grayling, Crawford Co., MI Newspaper Avalanche. NOTE: The date at the end of each extract indicates the date of the publication:
-FREDERIC FREAKS.
J. BLAINE and wife are proud over the arrival of a bouncing baby girl Aug. 28. (9 Sep 1909)


Verne MCDUNNEL

The following information extracted from the Grayling, Crawford Co., MI Newspaper Avalanche. NOTE: The date at the end of each extract indicates the date of the publication:
-FREDERIC FREAKS.
Born to Mr. and Mrs. Verne McDUNNEL a girl, Aug. 29. All doing well. (9 Sep 1909)


Joseph FOOT

The following information extracted from the Grayling, Crawford Co., MI Newspaper Avalanche. NOTE: The date at the end of each extract indicates the date of the publication:
-LOVELLS LOCALS.
Joseph FOOT died Tuesday of dropsy and old age, interment Wednesday in Lovells cemetery. (9 Sep 1909)


Rev. P. KJOHLDE

The following information extracted from the Grayling, Crawford Co., MI Newspaper Avalanche. NOTE: The date at the end of each extract indicates the date of the publication:
-Rev. P. KJOHLDE and wife are expected home today from their visit in Denmark since June. He will resume the regular service in the Danish church next Sunday. (9 Sep 1909)


Sam WHITE

The following information extracted from the Grayling, Crawford Co., MI Newspaper Avalanche. NOTE: The date at the end of each extract indicates the date of the publication:
-TERRIBLE ACCIDENT,
SAM WHITE MEETS DEATH BY WELL CAVING.
While working in a well on his farm three miles northeast of the village, Friday afternoon, Sam WHITE met with an accident which resulted in his death.
It seems that WHITE had a well driven using two inch casing. After getting this down a distance, they were unable to drive it further. they then placed an inch and a quarter casing inside of the two inch and drove to a depth of some sixty-three feet and got some seven feet of water. this of course was beyond the depth which it could be pumped. WHITE and John CHERNISH then attempted to dig down and place a cylinder deep enough to permit the well to be pumped.
They had dug down some twenty-three feet and had curbed it with poor quality of lumber. Realizing that this would not stand, WHITE ordered a load of two inch plank to be sent out Friday evening. They then attempted to pull the inch curbing, and as WHITE was down in the well tying the rope to the last peice of the curbing, a large amount of earth caved from the top of the well. WHITE was buried to a depth of between two and three feet over his head.
CHERNISH did not seem to realize that he could do anything alone and ran to the nearest neighbor for help. This neighbor refused to go, claiming to be afraid of further caving. CHERNISH then ran to the home of Frank BURKE but Mr. BURK and his son Harry were working at the farm of Mr. MARSHALL about a mile away. As soon as CHERNISH reached them, they drove to the WHITE farm and understanding from CHERNISH that a much larger amount of earth covered WHITE, Harry BURKE ran his team to town for help. At once on his arrival, teams and auto's were rushed to the scene loaded with willing workers and the work of digging WHITE out was begun at once. On account of the size of the well at the bottom but two men could work, the dirt being shoveled into pails and hauled up by ropes. After uncovering his head it was found that WHITE's feet were tangled with the rope and curbing at the bottom and they were compelled to dig down below his knees before he could be pulled out. Dr. C. C. PROBERT was on the scene and made every possible effort to resuscitate him but with no success. Mr. WHITE was a new comer, this being his first season here. He had made many friends during his stay here and the accident cast a gloom over the entire community. His funeral will be held at the Congregational church on Sunday. He is survived by his widow.
Too much credit can not be given all the willing workers, who went to the scene, but especial credit must be given to Archie PHILLIP and Norman M. MARSH who went down into the well and at the risk of their own safety worked with shovels while they could be used and then with their hands in the futile effort to reach WHITE in time to save him. - Roscommon News. (23 Sep 1909)


Archie PHILLIP

The following information extracted from the Grayling, Crawford Co., MI Newspaper Avalanche. NOTE: The date at the end of each extract indicates the date of the publication:
-TERRIBLE ACCIDENT,
SAM WHITE MEETS DEATH BY WELL CAVING.
While working in a well on his farm three miles northeast of the village, Friday afternoon, Sam WHITE met with an accident which resulted in his death.
It seems that WHITE had a well driven using two inch casing. After getting this down a distance, they were unable to drive it further. they then placed an inch and a quarter casing inside of the two inch and drove to a depth of some sixty-three feet and got some seven feet of water. this of course was beyond the depth which it could be pumped. WHITE and John CHERNISH then attempted to dig down and place a cylinder deep enough to permit the well to be pumped.
They had dug down some twenty-three feet and had curbed it with poor quality of lumber. Realizing that this would not stand, WHITE ordered a load of two inch plank to be sent out Friday evening. They then attempted to pull the inch curbing, and as WHITE was down in the well tying the rope to the last peice of the curbing, a large amount of earth caved from the top of the well. WHITE was buried to a depth of between two and three feet over his head.
CHERNISH did not seem to realize that he could do anything alone and ran to the nearest neighbor for help. This neighbor refused to go, claiming to be afraid of further caving. CHERNISH then ran to the home of Frank BURKE but Mr. BURK and his son Harry were working at the farm of Mr. MARSHALL about a mile away. As soon as CHERNISH reached them, they drove to the WHITE farm and understanding from CHERNISH that a much larger amount of earth covered WHITE, Harry BURKE ran his team to town for help. At once on his arrival, teams and auto's were rushed to the scene loaded with willing workers and the work of digging WHITE out was begun at once. On account of the size of the well at the bottom but two men could work, the dirt being shoveled into pails and hauled up by ropes. After uncovering his head it was found that WHITE's feet were tangled with the rope and curbing at the bottom and they were compelled to dig down below his knees before he could be pulled out. Dr. C. C. PROBERT was on the scene and made every possible effort to resuscitate him but with no success. Mr. WHITE was a new comer, this being his first season here. He had made many friends during his stay here and the accident cast a gloom over the entire community. His funeral will be held at the Congregational church on Sunday. He is survived by his widow.
Too much credit can not be given all the willing workers, who went to the scene, but especial credit must be given to Archie PHILLIP and Norman M. MARSH who went down into the well and at the risk of their own safety worked with shovels while they could be used and then with their hands in the futile effort to reach WHITE in time to save him. - Roscommon News. (23 Sep 1909)


Norman M. MARSH

The following information extracted from the Grayling, Crawford Co., MI Newspaper Avalanche. NOTE: The date at the end of each extract indicates the date of the publication:
-TERRIBLE ACCIDENT,
SAM WHITE MEETS DEATH BY WELL CAVING.
While working in a well on his farm three miles northeast of the village, Friday afternoon, Sam WHITE met with an accident which resulted in his death.
It seems that WHITE had a well driven using two inch casing. After getting this down a distance, they were unable to drive it further. they then placed an inch and a quarter casing inside of the two inch and drove to a depth of some sixty-three feet and got some seven feet of water. this of course was beyond the depth which it could be pumped. WHITE and John CHERNISH then attempted to dig down and place a cylinder deep enough to permit the well to be pumped.
They had dug down some twenty-three feet and had curbed it with poor quality of lumber. Realizing that this would not stand, WHITE ordered a load of two inch plank to be sent out Friday evening. They then attempted to pull the inch curbing, and as WHITE was down in the well tying the rope to the last peice of the curbing, a large amount of earth caved from the top of the well. WHITE was buried to a depth of between two and three feet over his head.
CHERNISH did not seem to realize that he could do anything alone and ran to the nearest neighbor for help. This neighbor refused to go, claiming to be afraid of further caving. CHERNISH then ran to the home of Frank BURKE but Mr. BURK and his son Harry were working at the farm of Mr. MARSHALL about a mile away. As soon as CHERNISH reached them, they drove to the WHITE farm and understanding from CHERNISH that a much larger amount of earth covered WHITE, Harry BURKE ran his team to town for help. At once on his arrival, teams and auto's were rushed to the scene loaded with willing workers and the work of digging WHITE out was begun at once. On account of the size of the well at the bottom but two men could work, the dirt being shoveled into pails and hauled up by ropes. After uncovering his head it was found that WHITE's feet were tangled with the rope and curbing at the bottom and they were compelled to dig down below his knees before he could be pulled out. Dr. C. C. PROBERT was on the scene and made every possible effort to resuscitate him but with no success. Mr. WHITE was a new comer, this being his first season here. He had made many friends during his stay here and the accident cast a gloom over the entire community. His funeral will be held at the Congregational church on Sunday. He is survived by his widow.
Too much credit can not be given all the willing workers, who went to the scene, but especial credit must be given to Archie PHILLIP and Norman M. MARSH who went down into the well and at the risk of their own safety worked with shovels while they could be used and then with their hands in the futile effort to reach WHITE in time to save him. - Roscommon News. (23 Sep 1909)


John CHERNISH

The following information extracted from the Grayling, Crawford Co., MI Newspaper Avalanche. NOTE: The date at the end of each extract indicates the date of the publication:
-TERRIBLE ACCIDENT,
SAM WHITE MEETS DEATH BY WELL CAVING.
While working in a well on his farm three miles northeast of the village, Friday afternoon, Sam WHITE met with an accident which resulted in his death.
It seems that WHITE had a well driven using two inch casing. After getting this down a distance, they were unable to drive it further. they then placed an inch and a quarter casing inside of the two inch and drove to a depth of some sixty-three feet and got some seven feet of water. this of course was beyond the depth which it could be pumped. WHITE and John CHERNISH then attempted to dig down and place a cylinder deep enough to permit the well to be pumped.
They had dug down some twenty-three feet and had curbed it with poor quality of lumber. Realizing that this would not stand, WHITE ordered a load of two inch plank to be sent out Friday evening. They then attempted to pull the inch curbing, and as WHITE was down in the well tying the rope to the last peice of the curbing, a large amount of earth caved from the top of the well. WHITE was buried to a depth of between two and three feet over his head.
CHERNISH did not seem to realize that he could do anything alone and ran to the nearest neighbor for help. This neighbor refused to go, claiming to be afraid of further caving. CHERNISH then ran to the home of Frank BURKE but Mr. BURK and his son Harry were working at the farm of Mr. MARSHALL about a mile away. As soon as CHERNISH reached them, they drove to the WHITE farm and understanding from CHERNISH that a much larger amount of earth covered WHITE, Harry BURKE ran his team to town for help. At once on his arrival, teams and auto's were rushed to the scene loaded with willing workers and the work of digging WHITE out was begun at once. On account of the size of the well at the bottom but two men could work, the dirt being shoveled into pails and hauled up by ropes. After uncovering his head it was found that WHITE's feet were tangled with the rope and curbing at the bottom and they were compelled to dig down below his knees before he could be pulled out. Dr. C. C. PROBERT was on the scene and made every possible effort to resuscitate him but with no success. Mr. WHITE was a new comer, this being his first season here. He had made many friends during his stay here and the accident cast a gloom over the entire community. His funeral will be held at the Congregational church on Sunday. He is survived by his widow.
Too much credit can not be given all the willing workers, who went to the scene, but especial credit must be given to Archie PHILLIP and Norman M. MARSH who went down into the well and at the risk of their own safety worked with shovels while they could be used and then with their hands in the futile effort to reach WHITE in time to save him. - Roscommon News. (23 Sep 1909)


Rev. HUSTON

The following information extracted from the Grayling, Crawford Co., MI Newspaper Avalanche. NOTE: The date at the end of each extract indicates the date of the publication:
-Rev. E. G. JOHNSON former pastor of the M. E. church here, is assigned to Lexington, in Sanilac county, for the ensuing year. Rev. James IVER is assigned to Grayling, Rev. Mr. HUSTON who has been here having declined further appointment in this conference district. Our citizens will regret that Mr. HUSTON does not return, as he and his family have made many friends during their stay. (23 Sep 1909)


Tom ROLAND

The following information extracted from the Grayling, Crawford Co., MI Newspaper Avalanche. NOTE: The date at the end of each extract indicates the date of the publication:
-SOUTH BRANCH NOTES.
We have hard of the tent dwellers of old but all may not know that we have a couple of them in our midst. Tom ROLAND and wife last spring purchased ten acres in the middle of section 33, away from roads, towns and neighbors. Since that time they have lived practically out of doors, part of their household goods being sheltered by a tent, while they worked a small portion of their farm and at odd times worked on the log house which will soon be ready for occupation. the farming was not a great success as the first frost destroyed nearly all the crops, but they are still hopeful and look forward to better things. (30 Sep 1909)


Frank GOLNAC

The following information extracted from the Grayling, Crawford Co., MI Newspaper Avalanche. NOTE: The date at the end of each extract indicates the date of the publication:
-SOUTH BRANCH NOTES.
Mr. and Mrs. Frank GOLNAC are the proud parents of a little son who was born Monday, Sept. 27th. But their joy is as nothing compared to that of Grandpa Jake, for he is the happiest man in Crawford county. (7 Oct 1909)


Charles KISSAM

The following information extracted from the Grayling, Crawford Co., MI Newspaper Avalanche. NOTE: The date at the end of each extract indicates the date of the publication:
-LOVELLS LOCALS.
Charles KISSAM, who has been in the employment of the Forest Farm Co., the past few months handed in his resignation Wednesday, it was accepted, and he departed the same day for Bay City. (7 Oct 1909)


David AUSTIN

The following information extracted from the Grayling, Crawford Co., MI Newspaper Avalanche. NOTE: The date at the end of each extract indicates the date of the publication:
-Born to Mr. and Mrs. David AUSTIN, October 1st, a nine pound girl. (7 Oct 1909)


Carl KREIPKE

The following information extracted from the Grayling, Crawford Co., MI Newspaper Avalanche. NOTE: The date at the end of each extract indicates the date of the publication:
-Efner MATSON and family have returned to "the only town on the map" for a permanent home, where they are welcomed by old friends. He has bought the barber business of Carl KREIPKE who will go to Los Angeles, California, while glad for their coming we regret KREIPKE's going. (7 Oct 1909)

-Mrs. Karl KREIPKE left Tuesday for Detroit to join her husband. He did not like the west and has come back to Michigan to stay. (13 Jan 1910)


Samuel DEAN

The following information extracted from the Grayling, Crawford Co., MI Newspaper Avalanche. NOTE: The date at the end of each extract indicates the date of the publication:
-Samuel DEAN has sold his cottages and grounds on the west side of Higgins Lake, in the Michigan Central Park Company's third addition, to Louis F. HOPKINS, a Chicago banker, who also has purchased an entire block of lots of the Michigan Central Park Co. Mr. HOPKINS will remodel the DEAN Cottages, and build a couple of new French Cottages on these beautiful grounds. DEAN was one of the first settlers on the west side of the lake, and has now purchased a valuable fruit farm of Mr. HATCH, up in the hardwood settlement, in Crawford county. We wish him success in his new venture. (7 Oct 1909)


Algot JOHNSON

The following information extracted from the Grayling, Crawford Co., MI Newspaper Avalanche. NOTE: The date at the end of each extract indicates the date of the publication:
-CARD OF THANKS.
Mr. and Mrs. algot JOHNSON desire to express their thanks to neighbors and friends, who extended to them their aid and sympathy during the sickness and at the final obsequies of their little daughter. Such kindness can never be forgotten or repaid. (27 Oct 1909)


Oliver ROBESHAW

The following information extracted from the Grayling, Crawford Co., MI Newspaper Avalanche. NOTE: The date at the end of each extract indicates the date of the publication:
-A daughter was born to Mr. and Mrs. Oliver ROBESHAW of South Branch last Sunday morning, and seemed bright and well, and was sleeping quietly by the side of its mother at 5 o'clock Monday morning. Mrs. ROBESHAW went to sleep after that time and wakened a little after six to find the little one dead by her side. (18 Nov 1909)


W. S. WILLIS

The following information extracted from the Grayling, Crawford Co., MI Newspaper Avalanche. NOTE: The date at the end of each extract indicates the date of the publication:
-W. S. WILLIS, aged 80 years, died at the county infirmary Friday, Nov. 12. He had worked at Deward as long as he was able to do anything previous to being brought here over a year ago. Henry STOPEL, 26 years of age, who has been a county charge for over two years, suffering intensely from a complication of diseases, was also relieved by death. Nothing is known here of their anicedents. (18 Nov 1909)


Henry STOPEL

The following information extracted from the Grayling, Crawford Co., MI Newspaper Avalanche. NOTE: The date at the end of each extract indicates the date of the publication:
-W. S. WILLIS, aged 80 years, died at the county infirmary Friday, Nov. 12. He had worked at Deward as long as he was able to do anything previous to being brought here over a year ago. Henry STOPEL, 26 years of age, who has been a county charge for over two years, suffering intensely from a complication of diseases, was also relieved by death. Nothing is known here of their anicedents. (18 Nov 1909)


Return to The Ward Family Web Page